Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 30, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm GMT

12:00 pm
this is bbc news — the headlines: the british socialite ghislaine maxwell is found guilty by a jury in new york on five counts of grooming and trafficking teenage girls for abuse. maxwell procured the girls for the financier and convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein — she faces the rest of her life behind bars. no matter who you are, no matter what kinds of circles you've travelled in, no matter how much money you have, no matter how many years have passed since the sexual abuse, justice is still possible. a coroner rules 32—year—old emad al swealmeen died from an explosion and fire caused by a device he made with murderous intent when it went off outside liverpool women's hospital. nhs england is to set up new nightingale hubs to combat a potential wave of covid admissions due to omicron.
12:01 pm
an extra 4,000 emergency hospital beds are to be deployed. around eight million lateral flow covid test kits will be sent to pharmacies before new year's eve. there are still shortages of the rapid tests and pcr slots in many parts of the uk. and new rules for home and motor insurance come into effect injanuary — which could save customers more than £4 billion in the coming decade. the british socialite ghislaine maxwell, daughter of the late and disgraced media mogul robert maxwell, has been found guilty of having helped her lover, the financierjeffrey epstein sexually abuse teenage girls. the 60—year—old was found guilty on five of the six counts she faced — including the most serious charge,
12:02 pm
of sex trafficking a minor. it means maxwell could spend the rest of her life behind bars. her legal team say they are working on an appeal. 0ur north america correspondent aleem maqbool reports. court sketches show the moment ghislaine maxwell's victims have waited decades for. after five days of deliberation, jurors decided she was guilty on five counts linked to the sexual abuse of teenagers. and it was four of her victims who helped put her behind bars. the court heard how ghislaine maxwell gained their trust. during their emotional testimony, they told the jury how she instructed them to give the late jeffrey epstein massages that turned sexual. all but one testified anonymously, using a pseudonym or just their first name. jane said maxwell participated in her encounters with epstein.
12:03 pm
kate said, after meeting epstein, maxwell asked her if she had fun, saying she was such a good girl and one of his favourites. and annie farmer, the only victim who publicly identified herself, said ghislaine maxwell gave her an unsolicited massage. she's now said she's relieved at the verdict and that it shows even those with great power and privilege will be held accountable when they sexually abuse the young. defence lawyers attacked the accusers�* memories and motives, but that ultimately didn't help ghislaine maxwell. we firmly believe in ghislaine's innocence. obviously, we are very disappointed with the verdict. we have already started working on the appeal and we are confident that she will be vindicated. police raids of epstein�*s homes showed the duo's jet—setting luxurious lifestyle. in this photo, the pair are seen
12:04 pm
relaxing at the queen's balmoral residence when prince andrew reportedly invited the couple to the estate. the staggering wealth on display from their opulent properties only highlighted how they used their power together over the years to lure, intimidate and silence everyone around them. house rules, including this manual, told staff to be deaf, dumb and blind, forbidding them from making eye contact with epstein. one of my clients said to me she has been living in a metaphorical prison all of these years with the psychological fallout of the sexual abuse, the deep shame and embarrassment and trauma that she has experienced and now, ghislaine maxwell is going to experience a real prison where she will have a lot of time to think about the profound damage she has caused to so many girls and young women. ghislaine maxwell will be sentenced at a later date but it seems extremely likely she will spend the rest of her life behind bars, a final fall from grace for the british former socialite
12:05 pm
who a jury here has decided wasn't just a bystander to the crimes ofjeffrey epstein but was herself a predator and an active participant in the sexual abuse of teenagers. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in new york. in a statement posted to twitter early on thursday morning, maxwell's family said they were "very disappointed" with the verdict and had already begun the appeal process. 0ur correspondent nomia iqbal has also been following the trial for us in new york. after six days of deliberations the jury returned their verdict. we were in and out of the courthouse behind me where the trial took place and sawjust how engaged the jury was throughout. even before the verdict was released, they had asked the judge if they could re—examine some of the testimonies, in fact, they asked to look at the testimonies of all of the four women at the heart of the prosecution case again. at the start of the week they had
12:06 pm
asked for office supplies which was something they needed to try and arrive at their verdict. one of the concerns that the judge had in all of this is the rising cases of 0micron in the city, they have been skyrocketing and she was worried that the longer the deliberations went on for, the more chance there was of someone getting the virus and that would have of course hugely impacted the proceedings but she stressed to them to take their time, however long it took. they had gone home for christmas and returned and they were potentially facing working throughout the new year period and the weekend to arrive to their verdict. but this isn't over yet for ghislaine maxwell, she is facing another trial here in new york next year. this is a perjury trial, she is accused of lying under oath in a deposition relating to jeffrey epstein a few years ago and those are charges she also denies. 0ne ofjeffrey epstein�*s accusers, virginia giuffre released a statement in reaction
12:07 pm
to the verdicts. in the statement she says: former detective mark williams—thomas is an investigative journalist — as a child—protection specialist he is best known for hisjimmy savile expose the other side ofjimmy savile and joins me now. how strong did the prosecution case make their case, by choosing the
12:08 pm
witnesses that they did and leaving out those that did not appear? it’s out those that did not appear? it's alwa s a out those that did not appear? it�*s always a careful consideration of any prosecution case to put forward your strongest evidence, and if there are people you would put forward that perhaps would cast doubt on some of that, and clearly they took the decision to put the people forward, and they felt that was a strong enough case, and clearly it was. it's now been shown the true jury that they came back and ultimately, although there were six charges, five of those have now been proven. i think what is very clear is that there's an awful lot made of virginia giuffre's evidence, and also the former lawyer of eckstein. the issue is he has come out very clearly now and he was on your programme last night, he has come out and said that the evidence
12:09 pm
the prosecution used, because they did not use giuffre, the evidence was very bleak. that is not your toe. the prosecution took the decision to put forward the evidence it was the strongest evidence on ghislaine maxwell. giuffre's evidence does not necessarily relate to ghislaine maxwell, and anyone who says that maxwell was not as much an instigator of this, she knew exactly what she was doing, and it is right now that she will spend the rest of her life injail. we now that she will spend the rest of her life in jail.— her life in “ail. we are waiting to hit the her life in jail. we are waiting to hit the sentencing, _ her life in jail. we are waiting to hit the sentencing, aren't - her life in jail. we are waiting to hit the sentencing, aren't we? l her life in jail. we are waiting to - hit the sentencing, aren't we? they do say they are going to appeal. let's just make it clear, the man you are referring
12:10 pm
to is alan dershowitz, and they deny wrongdoing and are appealing. do you think that things will change as the years roll by?— years roll by? maxwell is a very interesting _ years roll by? maxwell is a very interesting character, _ years roll by? maxwell is a very interesting character, her - years roll by? maxwell is a very| interesting character, her father interesting character, herfather was a socialite, an incredible bully, also very influential, and when he died she had to replace up with somebody, and i think she naturally replaced that with epstein. the difference between epstein. the difference between epstein and maxwell is very clear. he was very reclusive, he didn't follow the social circles maxwell day, he didn't really like to mix, whereas maxwell had all the contacts, and it is through her contacts, and it is through her contacts that she managed to introduce epstein to the people he had contact with. this is a man who spent time in the company with two former presidents, trump and also clinton, a man who had had
12:11 pm
relationships and friends with some of the worlds richest man. what is in question now is whether or not there will be further allegations in relation to other parties, because maxwell will start speaking. i do not think that is going to happen. maxwell, i think, not think that is going to happen. maxwell, ithink, will not think that is going to happen. maxwell, i think, will remain silent and she will keep your mouth shut in relation to other people, but there are other people very influential, senior people who are very high standing, both past and present, who have undoubtedly been caught up in epstein�*s offending. whether they will now be brought to justice remains the question, and sadly i think it's unlikely. you remains the question, and sadly i think it's unlikely.— think it's unlikely. you say you do not think that _ think it's unlikely. you say you do not think that ghislaine _ think it's unlikely. you say you do not think that ghislaine maxwell. not think that ghislaine maxwell will try to do a deal. if she did, that could potentially reduce her sentence, if she were to name other people who are implicated. why are are convinced that she will not? 50.
12:12 pm
are convinced that she will not? so, the criminal— are convinced that she will not? if, the criminaljustice system are convinced that she will not? sr, the criminaljustice system in america is very different to the british criminaljustice system in terms of plea bargaining. so, if you are a defendant facing a lengthy custodial sentence in you enter into a plea deal with the prosecution, that can significantly reduce your sentence. she has not done that, and i think that it is now a position where she would have done that if she had wanted to enter that road, whereas in the uk, you can put forward your cooperation with the police in respect of an investigation, but the judges very rarely are minded to give a reduction as a result of the cooperation in respect of other people. so, there is a very big difference in america. i think that is a card the prosecution, sorry, the defence team, max will pose �*s defence team would have played by now, they have not done, netting us because maxwell will keep quiet, and
12:13 pm
i'm sure they will be worried to some degree of the power and influence of other people that will silence. in influence of other people that will silence. , ., , ., , silence. in terms of the survivors, let's finish — silence. in terms of the survivors, let's finish with _ silence. in terms of the survivors, let's finish with them. _ silence. in terms of the survivors, let's finish with them. this - silence. in terms of the survivors, let's finish with them. this was i silence. in terms of the survivors, let's finish with them. this was a l let's finish with them. this was a long time coming, it has all been played out immensely publicly, it is online. how much relief, really, is there in this for them? the victims ofthe there in this for them? the victims of the reason _ there in this for them? the victims of the reason that _ there in this for them? the victims of the reason that this _ there in this for them? the victims of the reason that this has - there in this for them? the victims of the reason that this has been i of the reason that this has been successfully ended as a result of the conviction. they had the power and the strength to go forward with this, and i think we all have to take our hats off in relation to them, but any victim of sexual abuse, of course, go through incredible torment by reporting it. then by going to court. what has happened to the girls in relation to this case is that they have become worldwide known, but also their life has been pulled apart. there are individuals that are out there, but it did the defence, but also people
12:14 pm
have been in support of epstein and maxwell, who have been very unfair, political, and have put their lives apart, and you have to remember these people have families, they have children, and what has been said about them because of the way the internet now works will stay in perpetuity forever, so we have to remember that notjust perpetuity forever, so we have to remember that not just strong perpetuity forever, so we have to remember that notjust strong enough to come forward and make the allegation was strong enough to have their life pulled apart, and i think we all know a debt of gratitude to those victims who have stayed strong to stay with this to finally see justice. to stay with this to finally see 'ustice. ., ~' , ., , to stay with this to finally see 'ustice. ., ~ , ., , . ., justice. thank you very much for 'oinin: justice. thank you very much for joining us- _ a coroner has given a verdict at the inquest into the death of the liverpool women's hospital bomber, emad al swealmeen. a narrative conclusion was reached that al swealmeen died in a taxi in front of the hospital, from an explosion and subsequent fire caused by an improvised explosive device which he had carried into the vehicle. it said that he'd manufactured the device with murderous intent.
12:15 pm
sport now, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. chelsea manager thomas tuchel says they'd be "stupid" to think they can win the premier league title while they have so many players out injured or ill. they're eight points behind leaders manchester city, after a draw at brighton last night. romalu lukaku put them ahead in the first half, but in stoppage time, substitute danny welbeck found the equaliser. tuchel was exasperated, explaining that they'd had seven covid cases, and the players were bound to be tired. sure they are tired, if you have been in bed for ten days and then you played a premier league match after that, you would look pretty tired after that. will you be speaking to the authorities about it again? no, no. in contrast, manchester city manager
12:16 pm
pep guardiola says the title race is farfrom over, despite that healthy lead at the top of the table. phil foden gave them a 1—0 win at brentford last night and guardiola was very happy with his side's performance. the way we played, the game we should play, that's why it was a perfect performance for us because i know how the other teams come here, they suffer, how many chances they create, so we did not concede once in the second half, and that is because the team played perfectly, the way we should play. there's just one game tonight, with manchester united hosting struggling burnley. united are unbeaten since interim boss ralf rangnick took over at the start of the month but they've scored just once in each of their three league games against crystal palace, norwich and newcastle on tuesday night. so is this a good time for sean dyche to be taking his side to old trafford? they have found ways of finding
12:17 pm
moments that counts, even if they maybe are not purring, but we cannot be naive enough, and we would not be, to think there is to a perfect time to play them, you can only say that after the time. they had a quite small, partly it was that we had a better game, sometimes you need to against the superpowers. england's cricketers will fly to sydney for the fourth ashes test without head coach chris silverwood. he's in isolation after one of his family tested positive for covid — they'll have to stay in melbourne for 10 days. that's the seventh positive test in the touring party — three support staff and four family members have all contracted the virus. the match is due to start next wednesday. clearly, it is very disruptive for the players, who, as yet, none of them has tested positive, but they are being tested daily. we should not forget that the coach was in contact with some of them yesterday during net practice. so it will be an anxious wait for the next few days to see if any of the england players actually test positive for themselves.
12:18 pm
they fly to sydney on a charter plane tomorrow. as they are trying to keep them separate from everybody else, they and the australians are flying together. but there is no doubt it will be an anxious weekend ahead for the england players. match referee david boon has also tested positive, so he won't make it to sydney — that was confirmed just as a big bash league match in melbourne was called off following a covid case. covid news too from the pdc world darts championship at alexandra palace, as a third high—profile player has been forced to withdraw. dave chisnall has joined three—time winner michael van gerwen and vincent van der voort in pulling out after a positive test. we were treated to one of the matches of the tournament so far last night — michael smith beating jonny clayton, who took a two set lead before falling 3—2 behind, and needing a bullseye to level . and the deciding set went to a tie—break, smith eventually winning it
12:19 pm
at around 11 o'clock, to set up a meeting with the defending champion gerwyn price. that's all the sport for now. there were 33 fewer deaths with coronavirus in england and wales in the latest recorded week, according to the the office for national statistics. it's the lowest number of deaths since the middle of october. the number of deaths involving covid—i9 has now been falling since the mid—november. however the 0ns says the number of deaths in total in the uk was 14% above the five—year average. three quarters of people with new cold—like symptoms are likely to have covid but exponential case growth seems to have stopped, according to the zoe covid study app. this is up from around 50% last week. with me now is dr claire steves, she is a scientist on the zoe covid study app and reader at king's college london.
12:20 pm
thank you very much forjoining us. what strikes you, then, about these latest figures, the things that you were hopeful about and maybe a little more pessimistic? i think it's really good _ little more pessimistic? i think it's really good news _ little more pessimistic? i think it's really good news and - little more pessimistic? i think it's really good news and the i little more pessimistic? i think. it's really good news and the early data, the cases seem to have slowed, it's much more linear in most age groups, in the school—age children the rates are starting to reduce again, but the slightly worrying thing is that in the over 55 is the rates are still on the incline, and that means we are promised or not at the end of it in terms of hospitalisations.- the end of it in terms of hospitalisations. the end of it in terms of hositalisations. , ., hospitalisations. so, there is often a delay between — hospitalisations. so, there is often a delay between seeing _ hospitalisations. so, there is often a delay between seeing a - hospitalisations. so, there is often a delay between seeing a certain l a delay between seeing a certain number of cases, maybe they are growing, and whether there is going to be a commensurate number of deaths that we would expect from that sort of cohort. just deaths that we would expect from that sort of cohort.— that sort of cohort. just explain how it all works. _ that sort of cohort. just explain how it all works. i _ that sort of cohort. just explain how it all works. ithink- that sort of cohort. just explain how it all works. i think if- that sort of cohort. just explain how it all works. i think if we i
12:21 pm
how it all works. i think if we think back to this time last year, we had much fewer numbers of cases of covid, but we've had far higher deaths in far higher hospitalisations, and really the big change that we have made is vaccination, which is massively reduce the chances of hospitalisation and sadly death, but now with 0micron what has happened is we have got a massive increase in the number of cases, and whilst vaccination and boosting, in particular is to hold that at bay, that still means the number of cases is translating them into quite a significant number of hospitalisations, and i think it will translate, sadly, into the number of deaths, especially as it starts to affect older age groups. purely because the numbers are so enormous?— purely because the numbers are so enormous? , , , ., enormous? exactly, their numbers are a- roachin: enormous? exactly, their numbers are approaching 200,000 _ enormous? exactly, their numbers are approaching 200,000 around - enormous? exactly, their numbers are approaching 200,000 around later - enormous? exactly, their numbers are approaching 200,000 around later in l approaching 200,000 around later in the whole of the uk, which is more than two times higher than it has ever been before.— than two times higher than it has ever been before. when we started three cases — ever been before. when we started three cases of _ ever been before. when we started three cases of covid, _ ever been before. when we started
12:22 pm
three cases of covid, people - ever been before. when we started three cases of covid, people were i three cases of covid, people were told to look out for a high temperature and the cough. we now know there are far more symptoms that can be associated with coronavirus, don't we? what are the new symptoms you would like to see added to the list? you new symptoms you would like to see added to the list?— added to the list? you are right, the cough. _ added to the list? you are right, the cough, fever _ added to the list? you are right, the cough, fever and _ added to the list? you are right, the cough, fever and anosmia, l added to the list? you are right, i the cough, fever and anosmia, loss of smell, with the first things we put down. interestingly, those are not the key symptoms now. partly because of vaccination, and maybe because of vaccination, and maybe because of vaccination, and maybe because of changes new variance, what most people are presenting with a headache and fatigue, things like sore throat, things like a runny nose, even, and sneezing. people have been vaccinated, the really important thing for everyone to realise is if you have a sore throat and you don't have a no smear, or don't have as fever, it could still be a crime. it's only to get a test. if you can find one. we know some
12:23 pm
more being released before new year. thank you so much forjoining us. the bbc understands that no further changes will be made to northern ireland's covid restrictions when stormont ministers meet today. they will meet virtually to review the latest data and fresh restrictions which came into effect on monday. ministers are expected to discuss whether the current 10—day period of self—isolation for confirmed cases should be reduced to seven days. from new year's day, insurers will be banned from quoting higher renewal prices for home and motor cover than they would for new customers. the financial conduct authority believes it'll save those staying loyal to companies around £4.2 billion over 10 years. but it could mean people who regularly switch providers will pay more. joining me now is charlotte clark, who is the director of regulation at the association of british insurers. thank you very much forjoining us. why has this happened in the past, that you try and stay loyal, and actually you get stung? i
12:24 pm
that you try and stay loyal, and actually you get stung? i suppose it ha--ens actually you get stung? i suppose it ha ens in actually you get stung? i suppose it happens in quite — actually you get stung? i suppose it happens in quite a _ actually you get stung? i suppose it happens in quite a few— actually you get stung? i suppose it happens in quite a few markets, i happens in quite a few markets, doesn't it? where you get really good introductory offers, it happens very competitive markets, but then when you stay with an insurer or a tv company or a mobile phone company, the prices start to go up. so the rumours coming in are basically saying that the people who stay with insurers, they cannot be charged more than new customers. hosp charged more than new customers. how su ortive charged more than new customers. how supportive are you of this? this - charged more than new customers. how supportive are you of this? this is i supportive are you of this? this is something — supportive are you of this? this is something we _ supportive are you of this? this is something we have _ supportive are you of this? this is something we have been - supportive are you of this? this is something we have been asking l supportive are you of this? this is i something we have been asking for, and it realise it sounds like a strange, we are aware that long—standing customers kind of feel that they are disadvantaged. that said, the people have been shopping around, they've been getting some really great deals, but what this does is it allows there to be a level playing field between existing customers and new customers, and we think that is probably the right thing in the long term. haifa think that is probably the right thing in the long term. how likely is it that new—
12:25 pm
thing in the long term. how likely is it that new customers - thing in the long term. how likely is it that new customers might i thing in the long term. how likely l is it that new customers might find they cannot get those really cut—price deals because insurance providers that want to pass them onto their current customers? people at the moment. _ onto their current customers? people at the moment, when _ onto their current customers? people at the moment, when they _ onto their current customers? people at the moment, when they are - at the moment, when they are shopping around, frequently get below cost price deals. that is not really sustainable offer below cost price to all of your customers, so, you are right, four people have been shopping around, they have been getting some excellent deals, there are winners and losers from this reform, it's notjust everyone will gain, it's kind of rebalancing between existing customers and new customers. ~ . , , , customers. what is the best approach to net the customers. what is the best approach to get the best _ customers. what is the best approach to get the best deal? _ customers. what is the best approach to get the best deal? obviously i customers. what is the best approach to get the best deal? obviously you i to get the best deal? obviously you get what you pay for with insurance, but are you best to stay with your insurer now? 0r but are you best to stay with your insurer now? or are you best to keep shopping around? it is hard to know. definitely shop around. it is always worth looking and seeing what is out there, whether or not there are
12:26 pm
offers. different insurers use data in different ways. it is always worth looking and seeing whether or not you are getting a good deal compared to the rest of the market. you should, if you stay with your insurer, get the same as what they are attracting new customers to them to be, so hopefully that gives people a bit of security. i'm fairly certain no one wants to spend that much time shopping for insurance, so it gives people a bit of confidence if they have just decided to deal with their existing insurer, but it is important to shop around, it's what copper you get, as well. it’s what copper you get, as well. it's ruite a what copper you get, as well. it's quite a minefield if you let it be. thank you very much. foreign office officials are seeking clarification from the french authorities on travel rules for british citizens with homes in the eu after passengers travelling on the eurotunnel shuttle services between britain and france, and on p&0 ferries were told they were banned from travelling through france. most british tourists and business people are already banned from travelling to france
12:27 pm
because of britain's high covid infections. 0ur political correspondent peter saull explained what the situation was. the foreign office are seeking urgent clarification from the french authorities as to what the rules are. as things stand, the french government makes it clear that unless you have a compelling reason to enter france, or if you are resident in the country, then you are not allowed into the country. but a compelling reason, according to the current rules, is travelling through france to get to another eu nation, if that is your country of residence. but eurotunnel put the statement up on their website last night saying that following a french decision on 28th december that unless they have french residency, british citizens are now considered third country citizens, and can no longer transit france by road to reach their country of residence. and we have already heard of examples of people being turned away by french customs agents. some have made it into france
12:28 pm
by using the eurostar rather than eurotunnel. the foreign office is making it clear that as far as it is concerned, the uk has some pretty binding agreements with the european union that allow brits that are resident in the eu, whichever country they are in, to transit the eu to get there. diplomatic relations had not been great with the french of late. there have been rows over fishing among other things. with this, it seems confusion is reigning. the french interior ministry, we have contacted for comment. we have yet to hear back from them, but they have told the mail 0nline that eurotunnel is wrong, and that british citizens, if they have residency in another eu country, can travel through france. so really quite a confusing picture, and we, like the foreign office are trying to get to the bottom of what the rules actually are. now it's time for a
12:29 pm
look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to darren bett. hello, good afternoon, it is mild again today thanks to some fairly brisk winds from the south, even a bit of sunshine for eastern parts of the uk. still some drizzly rain affecting western scotland, but this is the main area of rain that is developing, moving into wales, heading into the north west of england to the midlands, so these areas will see some wet weather of the next few hours, and if you look at these temperatures, 13—16 pretty widely. this area will continue to push northwards, the northern ireland and northern england, the wetter weather moves into southern scotland, short burst of rain sweeping across england and wales. keeping temperatures up, very mild, temperate is not fully very much, it always chillier in northern scotland we had the clearer skies. that rain moves away from east anglia and the south—east, many parts of the uk tomorrow brightening up the sunshine, just as windy either, just
12:30 pm
proud of rain left over across central and southern scotland, the far north of england, the rain eased off in the afternoon, but these areas will stay cowardly kind but i suspect, central belt of scotland 16 or even 17 and south—east. hello, this is bbc news. the british socialite ghislaine maxwell is found guilty by a jury in new york on five counts of grooming and trafficking teenage girls for abuse. maxwell procured the girls for the financier and convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein. she faces the rest of her life behind bars. a coroner rules 32—year—old emad al swealmeen died from an explosion and fire caused by a device he made with murderous intent when it went off outside liverpool women's hospital. nhs england is to set up new nightingale hubs to combat a potential wave of covid admissions due to 0micron. an extra 4,000 emergency hospital beds are to be deployed.

24 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on