Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  January 9, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PST

1:00 am
the notorious mexican drug lord finally recaptured. how police tracked down el chapo. tensions remain high on the korean peninsula days after pyongyang says it deadnated a hydrogen -- detonated a hydrogen bomb. a live report. and a muslim woman escorted from a donald trump rally after standing up in protest. it was trump supporters who made all the noise. hello, and welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world, i'm lynda kinkade, and this is "cnn newsroom." our top story, mexico is returning the world's top drug
1:01 am
lord to the same prison he escaped from last year. joaquin "el chapo" guzman was recaptured friday after a months' long investigation led him to a house where he was hiding with associates. he escaped but was later captured on a highway. this is the third time guzman has been captured by mexican authorities. cnn has more on the dramatic arrest this time around. >> reporter: he was paraded in front of the media and forced to look straight into the cameras. joaquin guzman known as "el clap oh," one of the most-wanted men in the world, caught at last. for the first time, authorities are disclosing details about the raid to capture him in his home turf. officials say five of his associates died in the shoot-out. guzman and one of his lieutenants took advantage of the fire-fight to flee through a
1:02 am
manhole connecting to the sewer system. navy personnel chased them through the sewer tunnels, attorney general gomez said. they came out through a manhole to the street level and fled into vehicles. this picture of el chapo was taken shortly after his capture on a highway outside los muchez. soldiers took him and his aide to a motel while they wait for reinvoermts. he was then led by mexican soldiers into a military truck and later flown to mexico city. president nieto broke the news on twitter saying "mission accomplished." the mexican government is under pressure to deport him to the united states. he faces drug charges in several states. >> what you have to establish is that there's an indictable offense that's been committed. that there's probable cause to believe he committed the offense and we would otherwise have jurisdiction over them. >> reporter: mexicans acted with
1:03 am
a mix -- reacted with a mix of surprise and disbelief. "i, like all mexicans, hoped the capture was real." he says, "it tells you a lot about corruption in mexico." what was the clue that finally led authorities to "el chapo"? the attorney general says he got reckless. his associates started calling producers and actresses because "el chapo" wanted a movie made about himself. now he's going back to the same prison where he escaped nearly six months ago while officials decide if he will be extradited to the united states. rafael romo, cnn. now that joaquin guzman is back in custody, attention turns to his cartel and who may be the next to run it. later this hour, we'll examine who could be next in line. venezuela's new parliamentary majority is cleaning house and stirring vefrs by removing -- controversially by removing
1:04 am
pictures of the late chavez. this is the latest shift since he was elected 17 months ago. the images were removed and in place maduro picture hung under armed guard. we have more from shasta darlington. >> reporter: this week marks a new era in venezuelan politics with the opposition taking control of control for the first time in nearly 17 years. and yet, it's these images that are sparking some of the most heated debate -- portraits of the latest hugo chavez being removed from the assembly. you can see the new president of the assembly on the steps of the capitol ordering them removed. you can even hear him saying at one point, "take them away, you can even throw them in the toilet. nothing stays here." the decision outrages many of
1:05 am
chavez's supporters. he was elected in 1998 and was in power until he died in 2013. his handpicked successor, nicholas maduro, came out calling it an affront to the nation and urging venezuelans to rebel against what he calls the neo-fascists in the assembly. the opposition has been saying they need to break with the past and what they say represents a marxist view. the problem is this sets a tone for the coming weeks and months. in a country that is suffering its biggest economic crisis in over a century, there's triple digit rise in violence. they're getting two sides throwing punches. shasta darlington, cnn, rio de janeiro. at least three european tourist were wounded on friday when two men carrying knives attacked a hotel along the red
1:06 am
sea coast in egypt. interior ministry officials said one was killed and another wounded at the hotel. no group has claimed responsibility. islamic militants have attacked in the area recently. in israeli, police say they've found and killed a man suspected of killing two people outside of a tel aviv pub on new year's day. they did not release his name but said previously the suspect is an araby israeli. he's suspected of killing a cab driver earlier. it's unclear what motivated the attack. in about an hour, we expect french president francois hollande to unveil a plot for a young female police officer killed a year ago during a string of terror attacks in paris.
1:07 am
clarissa jean philippe was killed after he stormed a supermarket. coulibaly was killed later in an intense standoff. aaron, how will the female police officer's life be honored today? >> reporter: hi, well, she was 25 years old, clarissa jean philippe. on a highway. she stopped amadi coulibaly after a car accident. he shot her and tried to shoot her colleague. his gun jammed, and he somehow got away. the next day, coulibaly stormed the supermarket tragically killing four people before being shot and killed by authorities. there will be a ceremony remembering the kosher market -- kosher market attack later today. in the next hour or so, french president francois hollande will unveil a plaque remembering
1:08 am
carissa and her sacrifice. it will be the latest ceremony in a week of ceremonies remembering the "charlie hebdo" attacks. the week that was interrupted by yet another attack. an individual, a man attacked a police station with a butcher knife. he also was wearing a fake explosive belt. that is when authorities shot and killed him. they're still trying to figure out his identity. officials are treating that as a lone wolf-style attack. it illustrates, they say, the problems, the challenges that people here in france face. authorities are facing not only are they trying to stop the prospect of yet another elaborate attack the likes of which the country saw on november 13th, but they're dealing with the prospect of lone wolf-style attacks. people acting out of their own
1:09 am
volition, perhaps self-radicalized. difficult to predict, difficult to prevent. in the words of the french prosecutor, authorities here in france have no reason, they say, to be optimistic. lynda? >> and talking about how authorities can prevent another attack, explain the security situation there and how are people dealing with this. obviously the commemorations coming less than two months after the last major attack which left 130 people dead. >> reporter: i wouldn't say people here are afraid. they seem to be going about their business as usual. people i have talked to say that they are accepting of what the government is saying which is that france is at war. people also seem to be accepting of what the government is doing as a result. for instance, in the wake of the "charlie hebdo" attacks, legislation was passed that it would increase government powers
1:10 am
to surveil its citizens, electronic surveillance, in the wake of the november 13th attacks. the government implemented a state of emergency, a state of emergency which persists today which gives the government more powers to be able to do things such as search homes without warrants. and then in february, the government is expected to introduce even more legislation giving them more surveillance powers. this, of course, in a country that fiercely guards its civil liberties. and yet today, people here see these measures as necessary. >> okay. thank you very much for that update from paris. we will check in with you again shortly. in a cnn exclusive, we'll take you to the hometown of a shiite cleric whose execution by saudi arabia has sparked sectarian and diplomatic tensions right across the middle east. plus, cnn goes inside north korea. an exclusive look at life there since leaders say they detonated
1:11 am
a hydrogen bomb. now another new doubt is cast on its weapons program. i'm caridee. i've had moderate to severe plaque psoriasis most of my life. but that hasn't stopped me from modeling. my doctor told me about stelara® it helps keep my skin clearer. with only 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses... ...stelara® helps me be in season. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and increase your risk of infections. some serious infections require hospitalization. before starting stelara® your doctor should test for tuberculosis. stelara® may increase your risk of cancer.
1:12 am
always tell your doctor if you have any sign of infection, have had cancer, or if you develop any new skin growths. do not take stelara® if you are allergic to stelara® or any of its ingredients. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems. these may be signs of a rare, potentially fatal brain condition. serious allergic reactions can occur. tell your doctor if you or anyone in your house needs or has recently received a vaccine. in a medical study, most stelara® patients saw at least 75% clearer skin and the majority were rated as cleared or minimal at 12 weeks. stelara® helps keep my skin clearer. ask your doctor about stelara®.
1:13 am
joaquin "el chapo" guzman. ryan whitclarissa jean-philippe.
1:14 am
1:15 am
welcome back. arab foreign ministers will be meeting on saturday to discuss the attack on the saudi embassy in iran. since the attack last weekend, seven countries have cut or downgraded diplomatic ties with iran. the violent protests were triggered by the saudi execution of the shiite cleric who is highly respected in iran. his execution has fueled sectarian tensions across the middle east. cnn's nic robertson paid an exclusive visit to the cleric's hometown in eastern saudi arabia and met with his brother to get perspective on what's been happening. >> reporter: as we approach what's become saudi arabia's most dangerous town, a digger dumped by the townspeople gouging out a sectarian divide, cutting themselves off from the rest of the country. it is the shia town that's the hometown of executed shia cleric nimr al mimr.
1:16 am
we're told it's not safe to drive motor vehicles, we're in an armored vehicle. many have been shot at and killed. an online video, we can't be sure when it was shot, purports to be a police convoy just like ours under attack here. in a nearby hospital, we visit a young victim of the violence. he is clinging to life, caught in the crossfire between police and the men they call terrorists. >> he says his son's name is mohammed. he's 8 years old. his father doesn't want to be on camera. he's very concerned about it. from what we've been told by authorities is if he appears on camera, when he goes back, he could face problems. [ screams ] >> reporter: victims of the rising violence are increasingly common here. this man beaten.
1:17 am
he is a shia, shows me his injuries, shot in the ankle. his wrists broken and stabbed in the head. heless to me his kidnappers accused him of being a government spy which he denies. our drive through the area is proving uneventful. shops are open, no one shoots at us, shocking to police. not everyone is so surprised. al-nimr's brother has contacted us here. he says it is safe to get out and meet with him. he's been calling for calm. we meet later in a nearby town. he defends his brother whom the government accuses of inciting the violence. >> translator: there's a real problem in this country between the shia and the government. it's a political problem about the rights of the shias. >> reporter: since 2011, tensions in this tiny town of
1:18 am
25,000 people have grown. confrontations between handfuls of youths and police have sometimes turned deadly. police say they want to avoid civilian casualties and arrest the people they call terrorists. >> if we want to engage these people directly, then we know there will be victims. that is not allowed actually in our job. we have to wait patiently. >> reporter: in awamia, time is on no one's side as tensions here and across the region rise. nic robertson, cnn, awamia, saudi arabia. for the second straight day, south korea is blasting pyongyang anti-propaganda against north korea. this comes after the north claims to have detonated a hydrogen bomb. friday, south korea's foreign minister spoke with his chinese counterpart. china is north korea's only real
1:19 am
ally and has reaffirmed its opposition to pyongyang's nuclear test. for several days, north korea has been celebrating its test. cnn is the only u.s. broadcaster reporting from inside the country. our reporter will ripley joins us from pyongyang. north korea has just aired what it says is a test run of a submarine-launched missile. we know one u.s. think tank claims to have some satellite images which seem to support that, but there is skepticism. >> reporter: yeah. and that skepticism was raised primarily from the south koreans who often try to dispute north korea's claim when they make a military announcement. for example, the nuclear test, south korea was one of the countries along with china and the u.s. who tried to detect a change in radiation levels which they haven't found so far. in this case, what south korean media have been saying is that it looks like images that north korea released of the submarine-launched missile may have been edited clips of video
1:20 am
from previous attempts at submarine-launched missiles or previous videos that had been released by state media here. however, what is indisputable is the fact that the north koreans are continuing to develop that technology, the technology to miniaturize warheads, place them on missiles, and launch them from submarines or if the ground. and of course -- or from the ground. and of course the nuclear test this week another troubling layer for the international community, underscoring the fact north korea's military capability does continue to increase in spite of international pressure to stop. >> of course, there is a lot of skepticism, as well, about whether north korea even tested a hydrogen bomb. what are people in north korea saying? >> reporter: they believe that their government is telling them. it was front-page news, it was all over television as well as radio, all state controlled, of course. we visited a science center yesterday, spoke with students who spoke with proud about their country's accomplishment
1:21 am
successfully testing a hydrogen bomb. while there's plenty of skepticism in the out world, we've not found any in pyongyang. >> given that china is north korea's main trading partner and ally, it has the potential to wield a lot of power. there we know the chinese foreign minister met with his south korean counterparts. do you know if he's reached out to north korean officials? >> reporter: we don't know at this point what level of communication if any there has been between china and north korea over this particular nuclear test. yes, the two countries do have -- as far as north korea's vantage point, it is by far their biggest and most important friend. china sent a high-ranking member of their communist party in october, hand delivering a letter from xi jinping to mark a national holiday, the founder's day celebration. china was blind sided by the nuclear test. they were not given advance warning like they were for
1:22 am
previous tests. they are concerned because they provide economic aid and are the largest trading partner for north korea. any discussions happening behind closed doors we certainly don't know about aside from the official public statements condemning what north korea has done, urging peace and stability on the peninsula, and also urging the north koreans to denuclearize. >> south korea has been blasting propaganda into north korea, prodding its rivals so much that north korea says the broadcast is pushing it to the brink of war. how far does the noise reach? can you hear it where you are? >> reporter: yeah. so we're in pyongyang, about a two-hour drive to the demilitarized zone, 175 kilometers or so. the loud speakers would not have an effect, you wouldn't hear them near the capitol. in fact, the capitol has its own loud speakers playing music and messages throughout the day that
1:23 am
we can hear from our hotel. people hear in their homes. so this -- the loud speakers, sending music is something the north koreans use to distribute their propaganda within this country. what is significant the loud speakers on the dmz, on the south korean side, is that they're sending south korean propaganda messages within earshot of hundred of thousands of north korean troops stationed along the demilitarized zone. north korea has one of the largest standing armies in the world. that's infuriating for the regime that its soldiers, tasked with loyally defending the northern side of the peninsula, can hear these messages from the south that could perhaps send messages to cast doubt or create suspicion in the regime led by the supreme leader, kim jong-un. that's why the north considers the loud speaker propaganda an act of war. one official i've talked to here said they wouldn't be surprised if there was military action with the north possibly sending more troops to the dmz like they did over the summer. we haven't gotten any official response or information it what the north's strategy will be in
1:24 am
response yet. >> certainly an interesting tactic by the south. great reporting there, will ripley in pyongyang. thank you very much. a bush fire has burned through almost 60,000 acres, almost 150 acres in western australia. we have more from the international weather center. allison, i understand that four towns in the south of the state are being asked to evacuate their homes. >> yes, and one of the cities is the town of harvey. it really ramped up so quickly down there. they really didn't have a lot of chance to have much warning in there. they're asking people right now to voluntarily evacuate. as the wildfires begin to progress, they may have to do mandatory evacuations for the entire town of harvey and maybe the surrounding towns, as well. they're doing this because they look at other images. in fact, look at this one. this is out of the town in western australia. look at the fire again. it's not just the flames that you see. it's also the smoke plume that is out there. and it stretches for an incredibly vast amount of space.
1:25 am
sheer a look at some of the nasa energy that we have from tuesday. all the white dots are clouds. notice we fast forward just one day. now you start to see this grayish brown color. that is smoke from the initial fire sparked by lightning. fast forward one more day. notice how quickly it spread. again, these fires doubled in size overnight because the wind direction that we had really helped enhance it. then we fast forward one more day. again, it's hard to see because now you have all of these clouds from the convection. you'd think that would be a good thing, having all of these thunderstorms develop in the area. the problem is we didn't get that much rain out of it. all they really got was strong winds and a lot of lightning. and that's the last thing they need to have in the area. lightning was the initial cause of the fires in the first place. again, we expect some rain, but the biggest thing they're looking forward to is the change in wind direction. it had been coming from the northeast. now going to be an onshore wind.
1:26 am
that makes it a little bit easier for the firefighters to battle the blaze. again, they are looking forward to that wind shift. it should be taking place in the next 48 hours. moving on to the u.s., we are talking about a huge vat of cold arctic air coming down into parts of the midwest. look at some of these numbers. again, fargo, average is minus eight. they will be minus 21 degrees celsius on saturday. minneapolis, going from minus 12 to minus 16 tomorrow. folks, these are just the temperatures. this does not include the windchill. all of these areas are expected to have about a 20-kilometer-per-hour wind. one thing to note, the vikings' playoff game, they are playing the seahawks, may go down as the coldest vikings game in history on sunday. temperature expected to be zero degrees fahrenheit at the start of the game with a windchill of minus 18. i don't even know how many layers you could put on to make that feel okay. >> that is chilly.
1:27 am
i think it's the time of game you'd want -- type of game you'd want to watch at home. thank you very much. >> thank you. well, still ahead, fugitive drug cartel leader "el chapo" back in custody. the mexican government under pressure to extradite the drug lord to the u.s. we'll have more on those developments ahead. also, what police say influenced a man to ambush a police officer in the u.s. state of pennsylvania. stay with us.
1:28 am
1:29 am
1:30 am
hill lohello, i'm lynda kinkade. here's an update on the top stories this hour.
1:31 am
the extensive manhunt for drug lord joaquin "el chapo" guzman is over. he had been on the run since tunneling out of a maximum security prison in july. the new majority in venezuela's national assembly stirring controversy for removing images of the late president hugo chavez. current president nicholas maduro countered it by hanging pictures of his predecessor in a capitol plaza. hundreds of people there were protesting the removal of the portraits. in the next half hour, french president francois hollande is expected to unveil another plaque in paris as france marks one year since 17 people were killed during days of terror attacks. this morning's ceremony is for police officer claricea jean-philippe, killed by a gun before he stormed a supermarket and killed other people.
1:32 am
at least three terrorists were killed by men carrying knives at a hotel on the red sea coast. one attacker was killed and the other wounded at the bella vista hotel. back to our top story now. the world's top drug lord is back in custody. the mexican government is under pressure to extradite joaquin guzman to the u.s. where he faces federal indictments and charges in half a dozen states. last year's prison escape spurred criticism about mexico's ability to gun control g-- to control guzman with some saying he should have been held in the u.s. we asked a reporter in mexico city with intimate knowledge to weigh in. >> it mexican government is in a very difficult position. in 2014 when el chapo was arrested for the second time, the mexican government said with a bit of bravado that he would have to stay 300 to 400 years in mexico before any extradition could be contemplated. then he escaped which severely
1:33 am
damaged the level of trust between the u.s. and mexican authorities. there's now an official request for extradition, and a mexican government is in position in which it is almost -- in which it can almost impossibly resist the demand for extraditing chapo. then again, chapo's lawyers will most likely file more injunctions which could delay his extradition for an extended period of time. right now, the mexican government is going to need to extradite him at some point, but it's still -- the question is still how long it's going to take. >> and with el chapo in custody, attention turns to his cartel and who will run it. nick valencia looks at the man who could replace el chapo guzman at the top of the drug ring. who >> reporter: while el chapo was behind bars, the cartel was written by his right-hand man.
1:34 am
now the next generation might be stepping in. according to mexican media reports, a chicago-based drug dealer for the cartel recently testified that zambada has reportedly been grooming his own sons known as los mietos for the past ten years. many believe he's in line to inherit the drug empire. mexican officials have arrested through of his sons. they grew up in dad's drug business. drug war analyst silvio longmeyer tells cnn they were trained to be as brutal as el chapo. of course, el chapo may have his own sons to consider. leading crime analysts say los maytos may be better equipped to deal with the dynamics of modern drug trafficking, technology, and business strategy. however, with only one of los maytos not in custody, the organization that looks to promote from within may be running out of viable options. nick valencia, cnn, atlanta. u.s. federal authorities say the suspect accused of ambushing a philadelphia police officer on
1:35 am
thursday night had traveled to saudi arabia and egypt within the past five years. the fbi could not say whether the man had interacted with any terrorist groups. philadelphia police say the suspect said he shot the officer in the name of isis. miguel marquez reports. >> reporter: these photos show a man firing his gun directly into a philadelphia police officer's car, and police say he claims to have done it in the name of radical islam. >> shots fired! bleeding heavily! >> reporter: the suspect, 30-year-old philadelphia resident edward archer, allegedly ambushed officer jesse hartnett at close range, firing at least 11 shots from his .9 millimeter pistol, striking the officer three times in the arm. >> he pledges his allegiance to islamic state. he follows allah, and that is the reason he was called upon to do this. >> reporter: hartnett got out of the car and returned fire, hitting the gunman in the
1:36 am
buttocks. he was arrested and the gun recovered. >> the bravery he demonstrated was remarkable. his will to live undoubtedly saved his life. >> reporter: it was revealed by the police commissioner that the weapon used was a stolen police gun. >> it was stolen back in october of 2013. it was reported, and that is one of the things that you absolutely regret the most when an officer's gun is stolen, that it is used against one of your own. >> reporter: the fbi confirms its involvement, releasing a statement, "we are working side by side with the philadelphia police department," but made it clear philadelphia police are the lead agency in the case. in response to the shooting and another attack on police in paris, the new york police department issued a memo urging officers to exercise heightened vigilance and implement proactive measures at all times, reminding them that isis has called for supporters to carry
1:37 am
out attacks on law enforcement. >> our main concern at the moment today is the well being, health, recovery of officer hard net. >> it's confounding and astonishing that he was able to escape like this. i can't say enough for his bravery and how he conducted himself. >> miguel marquez reporting. still to come, the donald trump campaign has been accused of islamaphobia before. we'll tell you why there may be more of that criticism ahead after a rally in south carolina.
1:38 am
1:39 am
1:40 am
welcome back. a muslim woman was escorted out of a donald trump rally in south carolina. rose hamid wore a had jab to the rally and stood up in silent protest. the u.s. republican candidate linked syrian refugees to isis.
1:41 am
though she said nothing, trump supporters pointed and shouted at hamid until police led her out. jeff zeleny has the details. >> reporter: now donald trump attracts protesters pretty much everywhere he goes across the country, no exception on friday here in rockhill, south carolina. he drew a crowd of about 6,000 people or so to the campus of winthrop university. he fired them up talking about his pointed plans on immigration, his republican rivals as well as his attacks on hillary clinton. something changed about midway through the rally. there were a few sporadic protests throughout the crowd. then we noticed that one woman was standing up with a friend of hers silently protesting. turns out she was 56-year-old rose hamid. a flight attendant from nearby charlotte. the crowd quickly began to turn on her around her, and the police escorted her. look at the video as she's escorted out of the donald trump rally. she says for no reason in particular, she wasn't saying anything, but on the way out some of these supporters of
1:42 am
donald trump were aggressive and rude to her. she said she was not scared at all, but she had this takeaway from her experience. >> what happened when the crowd got this like hateful crowd mentality, as i was escorted, it was -- it was really quite telling of -- a vivid example of what happens when you start using this hateful rhetoric and how it can incite a crowd where moments ago were very kind to me. >> reporter: it was unclear if donald trump knew exactly what was happening behind him. there were protests breaking out throughout the event. but his rhetoric has caused some of these protest at his rallies across the country. he's campaigning aggressively in south carolina which is home to the first primary in the south. before that comes iowa. that's why he's heading there on saturday. he's launching a tough fight with ted cruz, the senator from texas. he's up by -- in many opinion polls including a new one by fox news friday night, up four points over donald trump which is exactly why donald trump is spending his saturday in iowa.
1:43 am
jeff zeleny, cnn, rockhill, south carolina. and donald trump used the rally in south carolina to further his attack on white house plans to strengthen gun control and claimed that his main democratic challenger, the 2016 presidential race, would continue what he sees as a clampdown on a bake right. >> we have a -- on a basic right. >> we have a president who wants to kill the second amendment. hillary clinton wants to destroy and take your guns away from you, by the way. [ booing ] she wants to take your guns away. and frankly, you can't do that with an executive order. you know, you're supposed to sit down with the democrats and the republicans and the liberals and the conservatives and everybody else, and you're supposed to hammer out deals. maybe you can't do it, but it's hard. to do that is hard. it means you have to devote -- that's what i do. my whole life is making deals. >> on thursday during cnn's special town hall on gun control, president obama firmly
1:44 am
denied that he intended to deprive responsible americans of their weapons. he told moderator anderson cooper that republican claims to the contrary are part of a plot to deceive voters. >> is it fair to call it a conspiracy? >> yeah, a lot of people believe this deeply. that they don't -- they don't trust you. >> i'm sorry, cooper. yes, it is fair to call it a conspiracy. what are you saying? [ applause ] >> are you suggesting that the notion that we are creating a plot to take everybody's guns away so that we can impose marshal law -- >> not everybody -- >> is a conspiracy? yes, that is a conspiracy. i would hope that you would agree with that. [ applause ] >> is that controversial? >> and delia michael spoke with cnn's commentator, jeffrey lord. he asked his response to president obama's guns in america town hall meeting. take a listen. >> there's a pretty wide gulf
1:45 am
here on this issue. this has been going on for decades. and i noticed the national rifle association was not there, and i should say, you know, one of the christmas presents i got unexpectedly to me from a relative was a membership in the nra. i don't even own a gun. i guess i now need to state that post christmas, that i'm a member of the nra. and i would just suggest here that the white house has made a mistake here. you know, they tried to make the nra the bad guy here for month and months and all the time he's been in office. then they want him to come to this. this was a cnn event, not a white house event. i think that the damage has been so severe here that there's just no trust. that's not a good thing. >> let's talk about the candidate's reaction, though. you had donald trump saying you won't be able to get guns, it's the same thing that we hear every time someone talks about
1:46 am
gun control. we hear that they're noting to take your guns away. however, we did a poll, a cnn orc poll that showed, yes, most democrats said they supported the president's moderate plan to rein in some guns, but also republicans that took the poll agreed, as well, that the members were quite lower. how does that square with what you're saying? >> well, the thing that -- live here in pennsylvania. and this is a very, very sensitive issue. a lot of people tend to think of pennsylvania as an urban northeastern state or mid-atlantic state. and point of fact, a fair share of elections have been lost here by proponents of gun control because we have a lot of hunters, a lot of nra members, a lot of gun owners here in the state. so i tend to think that you have to -- the polls aren't as important as actual elections, and when we get to election
1:47 am
time, boy, gun owners really turn out. i think that's what you have to look at. >> as far as the republican field, everyone it seems just about is saying that donald trump will not be the candidate. now that we're into 2016, we had a lot of candidates bickering among themselves this week, who knows how far he may go? what do you think? >> yeah. everybody thought i was crazy when i said he was going to run in the first place. then they said, well, he wouldn't file and wouldn't file his finances and all this. here we are. i really do think he's very serious. i think he has touched a nerve here in this country that was sort of out there before he got into the race that had nothing to do with him. but he understands it totally, and i think that this is -- you know, sort of rocket fuel for his campaign. one thing i would caution on, when ronald reagan ran against president gerald ford, the incumbent, in 1976, reagan lost not only the iowa caucus, he lost the next five primaries.
1:48 am
and yet, he won the north carolina primary. that went to the convention where he lost by 117 votes. four years later, he lost the iowa caucuses to george h.w. bush, won new hampshire, then they battled back and forth. it went on until may. and then reagan finally nailed it down. my suggestion is this is going to go on for a good long while here between donald trump and ted cruz and perhaps marco rubio and someone else, chris christie, et cetera. i think this will go on for a while. i think donald trump is very well positioned here. >> and what does that mean to the democratic field as far as they sit and wait to see how this shakes out? >> they do, although just tonight i was saying how much strength bernie sanders has in new hampshire. if he -- i think it's frankly unlikely, but boy, if he up-ends hillary clinton in new hampshire, this is not -- this does not bode well. and just in general, i have to say hillary clinton, whether
1:49 am
it's hillary clinton or anyone else, the democrats held the white house for eight years, it's very hard. ronald reagan was the rare exception, he was able to help elect george h.w. bush to what they called in the day reagan's third term. president clinton couldn't accomplish this for gloal gore. dwight eisenhower couldn't manage it for nixon, and he was a pretty popular president. it's a hard row to hoe for hillary clinton i think. >> it's going to be interesting months ahead. thank you very much for joining us. >> reporter: thanks for having me. still to come on "cnn newsroom," typically it's the female presidential contenders who face scrutiny for what they wear. now the tables have turned. why marco rubio is copping flack for his footwear. the booties that went viral ahead. ♪ we stop arthritis pain, so you don't have to stop. because you believe in go. onward. today's the day.
1:50 am
carpe diem. tylenol® 8hr arthritis pain has two layers of pain relief. the first is fast. the second lasts all day. we give you your day back. what you do with it is up to you. tylenol®.
1:51 am
1:52 am
1:53 am
welcome back. u.s. presidential candidates are usually scrutinized for their policy proposals and not their fashion sense. well, unless they're women. the internet went wild at one what male republican candidate wore on his feet. here's our jeanne moos with the
1:54 am
friends over the footwear -- frenzy over the footwear. >> reporter: marco rubio may say -- >> this is the most important election. >> reporter: -- but it's what he elected to wear on his feet that has his fellow republicans in the press poking fun. a vote for marco rubio is a vote for men's high-heeled booties, tweeted ted cruz's communications director, linking to a new york magazine article with that headline, "man heels," one reporter called them. >> look at that -- >> no, no, no. >> this is austin powers, baby. ♪ ♪ >> they're shag-alicious. >> reporter: if it wasn't austin powers, it was harry stiles from one direction inspiring rubio comparisons. when harry wears his boots with heels, girls squeal. >> i love you, harry! [ cheers ] >> reporter: will they squeal, "i love you, marco"?
1:55 am
the heels add maybe two inches to the 5'10" rubio. reporters tried to figure out which designer booties he was wearing. until the rubio campaign told politico they were from floor shines, perhaps the duke. this duke dress boot will unleash that kingly appearance in you, for $135. fellow candidate carly fiorina flaunted her higher heeled boots tweeting, "yeah, @marcorubio, but can you rock these?" and rubbing it in -- >> trying to choose new shoes. seeing as rubio has cute, new boots, we're wondering whether we need new shoes. >> reporter: chris christie might or at least new socks since these two seem mismatched. senator rubio's boots are made for walking. and to those who dare snicker -- >> are you ready, boots? start walking.
1:56 am
♪ >> reporter: jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> they are some high-heeled booties. now, most people throughout the united states are anxiously awaiting saturday night when numbers are drawn for the powerball lottery jackpot. it's worth $800 million. it's already the biggest lottery in the u.s. history. and if there's no winning ticket drawn, the jackpot will only continue to swell. i think i'll have to go out and get my ticket today. thank you very much for joining us, i'm lynda kinkade. i will be back after the break with another hour of "cnn newsroom" across the world. stay with us.
1:57 am
1:58 am
1:59 am
2:00 am
he escaped from prison not once but twice. after a six-month hunt, mexican drug lord "el chapo" is heading back behind bars. authorities hope it's third time unlucky for the cartel leader. marched out of a donald trump campaign event, a muslim speaks to cnn saying the presidential candidate and supporters are anti-islamic. and reaching for the stars. we examine the science in north korea. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and across the world. i'm lynda kinkade, and this is "cnn newsroom."
2:01 am
we begin in paris where french president hollande is honoring the life lost of a police officer taken down by a terrorist a day before storming a kosher supermarket where he killed four people. police killed the gunman after a standoff. paris has spent the week remembering people killed in a string of attacks last january. ♪ erin mclachlan now from paris with more. and no doubt a somber mood there today. >> reporter: it is a somber mood as they remember 25-year-old clarissa jean-philippe. she's a police officer just doing her job as she stopped m amedy coulibaly after a traffic accident. he shot her and tried to open
2:02 am
fire on her colleague. his gun, though, jammed, and he managed to get away. now they have gathered in the neighborhood of mont rouge, she was killed. president shold unveiling a plaque with her name, and they are going to rename the main road which you see there where the ceremony's taking place, they're renaming the main road in her honor. this ceremony will be followed later today by another ceremony that will be taking place at the kosher market. and that is where amedy coulibaly stormed the market killing four before he was shot and killed by authorities. dignitaries will be present for that event later today, as well. there as you see honoring this
2:03 am
fallen police officer, simply doing her job when she was killed by amedy coulibaly. french president hollande is there, as well as her family, as well as her fellow police officers to remember her sacrifice and remember her really. >> and these commemorations of course come a couple of month after the last attack in paris that left 130 dead. give us a sense of the security situation there. >> reporter: people here are on edge. the people i've been talking to say that they aren't necessarily afraid, but they are certainly aware and accepting in some respects of the extraordinary measures that the government has had to take in the wake of not only the "charlie hebdo" attacks but also in the wake of the november 13th attacks which killed 130 people in paris.
2:04 am
those measures include not only an increased police presence, heightened security throughout the country. this week, french president hollande announcing an additional 5,000 officers to be spread out throughout the country. if it also includes new powers. in the wake of the "charlie hebdo" attacks, they approved legislation to increase the left's powers to electronically surveil potential terrorists. in the wake of the november 13th terrorist attacks, the government implemented a state of emergency which is still ongoing which gives them more powers to do things such as house searches without warrants. they're expecting new legislation to be introduced in february giving the government yet again more powers to be able to deal with the prospect of terror in this country. all of this, of course, in a
2:05 am
country where people very much value their civil liberties. but people here that we've been speaking to seem accepting of the situation, that this, they believe, is what is necessary to prevent further bloodshed. >> absolutely. erin mclachlan in paris, thank you very much for your reporting. now to germany where protests have been building over recent days after a series of attacks and muggings during cologne's new year's eve celebrations. the criminal complaints include at least 120 claims of sexual assault. investigators have identified 31 suspect and say more than half of them are asylum-sukers. angry democrat -- seekers. angry demonstrators are questioning the policy on accepting migrants. coming up, a live report and the fallout from this year's new year's eve attacks. mexico is sending the world's top drug lord back to the same prison where he
2:06 am
escaped. just a few hours ago we saw joaquin "el chapo" guzman put on to a helicopter. authorities say months of investigation led him to a home where he was hiding. during a raid, guzman fled through a manhole connected to a sewer system. he was later caught on a highway near los maytos. we have more on the moments leading up to his capture. >> when one of the vehicles was located on the highway, elements of the forces that were participating in this intercepted and stopped guzman with the objective of securing the criminals and protecting the integrity of the elements, they were transferred to a nearby motel to wait for reinforcements. a few moments later, they were
2:07 am
transferred to the airport and subsequently to the city of mexico. >> this is the third time mcauthorities have captured guzman. we have timeline of events leading up to the fugitive's capture. >> reporter: a dramatic capture. the world's most wanted, most dangerous drug lord, joaquin "el chapo" guzman, back in mexican custody. mexico's president announcing mission accomplished after a nearly six-month manhunt for the cartel chief. >> this is massive. it's of enormous importance for the mexican government, in particular for mexican president enrique pena nieto. >> i think when you think of organized crime you think of john gotti, al capone. they pale in comparison to chapo guzman. >> reporter: a mexican official tells cnn at 4:30 friday morning, mexican special forces closed in on one of el chapo's houses in the city of los
2:08 am
maycez. five people were killed, all on el chapo's side. six arrested. a mexican marine was wounded. the official says el chapo was actually captured at a nearby motel. at least one analyst surprised he was taken alive. >> el chapo is a man who knows what the consequences of this are. he knows that there's a high likelihood that he's going to be sent to the united states to go jail there. he knows that there is probably no way out after this. so there's a real risk that he wouldn't even accept being captured alive. >> reporter: mexican officials say the drug lord had a lot of firepower near him. captured in the raid, a rocket launcher, eight rifles, two armored vehicles. >> he's known to have traveled with a security force of as many as 150. >> reporter: el chapo's escapes from mexican prisons are legendary. he broke out of a high-security prison in july through this elaborate tunnel. prison officials were fired, dozens of people charged over that. previously, el chapo eluded
2:09 am
police through a trapdoor hidden under his bathtub. the six-month search, an official tells us, extended into the united states. involved tracking the movements of el chapo's beauty queen wife believed to be seen in these photos posted on line. now the mexican government will be under enormous pressure to extradite the kingpin. >> the only way that the government of mexico is going to ensure absolutely that they don't go through another embarrassing situation, another embarrassing escape, is to extradite him to the united states. >> reporter: if that happens, el chapo could be a good source for law enforcement. former dea operations chief michael braun tells us when el chapo was captured by mexican authorities in the early 2000s, he sang like a canary, giving up a lot of information about rival cartels. brian todd, cnn, washington. and the mexican government is under pressure to extradite joaquin guzman to the u.s. where he faces federal indictments and charges in half a dozen states.
2:10 am
last year's prison escape sparked criticism about mexico's ability to control guzman with some saying he should have been held in the u.s. earlier we asked a journalist in mexico city who has intimate knowledge of the case to weigh in. >> reporter: in 2014 when chapo was arrested for the second time, the mexican government said with a bit of bravado that he would have to stay 300 to 400 years in mexico before extradition could be contemplated. then he escaped which severely damaged the level of trust between the u.s. and mexican authorities. a mexican government is in a position in which it is loom -- it can almost impossibly resist the demand for extraditing chapo. then again, chapo's lawyers will most lely file more injunctions delaying his stay for an extended period of time. right now the mexican government is going to need to extradite him at some point, but it's
2:11 am
still -- question is still how long it will take. >> with el chapo back in custody, attention turns to his cartel and just who will run it. nick valencia looks at the man who could replace el chapo at the top of the drug ring. >> reporter: while el chapo was behind bars, the cartel was effectively run by his right-hand man, ismail zambada. now the next generation might be stepping in. according to reports, a chicago-based drug dealer for the cartel recently testified that zambada has been grooming his own sons for the last ten years. many believe they're in line to inherit the drug empire. mexican officials have arrested through of zambada's sons. they grew up in dad's drug business. drug war analyst sylvia longmeyer tells cnn they were trained to be as brutal as el
2:12 am
chapo. of course, el chapo may have his own sons to consider. leading crime analysts say los mayitos may be better equipped to deal with the dynamics of modern drug trafficking, technology, and business strategy. however, with only one of los mayitos not currently in custody, the organization that looks to promote from within may be running out of viable options. nick valencia, cnn, atlanta. still to come, a philadelphia police officer is recovering from gunshot wounds when he was ambushed in his cruiser. what police say pushed the suspect to do it. plus, more drama for the donald trump campaign. we'll tell you why this muslim woman was escorted out of his rally. does the smell of a freshly fill you with optimism? do you love your wireless keyboard more than certain family members? is your success due to a filing system only you understand? does printing from your tablet to your wireless printer give you a jolt of confidence?
2:13 am
if so, you may be gearcentric. someone who knows that the right office gear helps you do great things. and there's one place that has it all. office depot officemax. gear up for great. hey, that's lactaid.milk! right. 100% real milk, just without the lactose. so you can drink all you want... ...with no discomfort? exactly. here, try some...
2:14 am
mmm, it is real milk. see? delicious. hoof bump! oh. right here girl, boom lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort and for a creamy and delicious treat, try lactaid® ice cream
2:15 am
welcome back. u.s. federal authorities say the suspect accused of ambushing a philadelphia police officer on thursday night had traveled to saudi arabia and egypt in the past five years. the fbi could not say whether the man had interacted with any terrorist groups, although philadelphia police say the suspect claimed he shot the officer in the name of isis. miguel marquez reports. >> reporter: these photos show a man firing his gun directly into a philadelphia police officer's car, and police say he claims to have done it in the name of radical islam. >> shots fired! i'm bleeding heavily! >> reporter: the suspect,
2:16 am
30-year-old philadelphia resident edward archer, allegedly ambushed officer jesse hartnett at close range, firing at least 11 shots from h his .9-millimeter pistol, striking the officer three taims in the arm. >> he pledges allegiance to allah, and that's the reason he did this. >> reporter: hartnett managed to get out of the car and returned fire, hitting the gunman in the buttocks. police arrested him and recovered the gun. >> the bravery he demonstrated was absolutely remarkable. his will to live undoubtedly saved his life. royal it was reveal -- >> reporter: it was revealed that the weapon used was a stolen police gun. >> it was stolen back in october of 2013. it was reported, and that is one of the thing that you absolutely regret the most when an officer's gun is stolen, that it is used against one of your own. >> reporter: the fbi confirm its involvement, releasing a
2:17 am
statement, "we are working side by side with the philadelphia police department," but made it clear philadelphia police are the lead agency in the case. >> in response to this shooting and another attack on police in paris, the new york police department urged officers to exercise heightened vigilance and implement proactive measures at all time, reminding them that isis has called for support force carry out attacks on law enforcement. >> our main concern at the moment today is the well being and health and recovery and rehabilitation of officer hartnett. >> it's confounding and astonishing that he was able to escape it like this. and i can't say enough for his bravery and how he conducted himself. >> miguel marquez reporting there. a muslim woman was kicked out of a donald trump rally south carolina. wearing a hajab, she stood up in
2:18 am
protest when trump linked syrian refugees to isis in his speech. police promptly escorted her out of the event. she said trump supporters yelled at her to get out with one person repeatedly criming, "you have a bomb." jeff zeleny reports. >> reporter: now donald trump attracts protesters pretty much everywhere he goes across the country. no exception on friday night here in rockhill, south carolina. he drew a crowd of about 6,000 or so to the campus of winthrop university. he fired them up talking about his pointed plans on immigration, his republican rivals, as well as his attacks on hillary clinton. something changed about midway through the rally. there were a few sporadic protests throughout the crowd. we noticed one woman was standing up with a friend of hers silently protesting. it was 56-year-old rose hamid, a flight attendant from charlotte. the crowd quickly turned on her, and police escorted her. look at the video as she's escorted out of the donald trump rally. she says for no reason in
2:19 am
particular, she wasn't saying anything, but on the way out, some of these supporters of donald trump were dplaefb aaggrd rude. she had this take away from the experience. >> what happened when the crowd got this hateful crowd mentality, as i was escorted, it was quite telling of -- and a vivid example of what happens when you start using hateful rhetoric and incite a crowd where moment ago were kind to me. >> reporter: it was unclear if donald trump knew what was happening behind him. there were protests breaking out throughout the event. his rhetoric caused some protests at rallies across the country. he's campaigning aggressively in south carolina, home to the first primary in the south. before that comes iowa. that's why he's heading there on saturday. he's launching a tough fight with ted cruz, senator from from
2:20 am
texas. he's up in opinion polls including a new one on fox news friday, up four points over donald trump, exactly why donald trump is spending his saturday in iowa. jeff zeleny, cnn, rockhill, south carolina. donald trump used the rally to further his attack on white house plans to strengthen gun control. he claimed that his main democratic challenger for the 2016 presidential race would continue -- [ inaudible ] >> clinton wants to destroy and take your guns away, by the way. [ booing ] she want to take your guns away. and frankly, you can't do that with an executive order. the liberals and conservatives and everybody else, you're supposed to hammer out deals. maybe you can't do it, but to do it is hard. my whole life is making deals.
2:21 am
that's what i do. >> thursday during cnn's special town hall on gun control, president obama firmly denied that he intended to deprive responsible americans of their weapons. he told moderator anderson cooper that republican claims to the contrary are part of a plot to deceive voters. >> let me jump in s. it fair to call it a conspiracy? a lot of people believe this deeply, that they don't -- they don't trust you. >> i'm sorry, cooper, yes, it is fair to call it a conspiracy. what are you saying? [ applause ] >> are you suggesting that the notion that we are creating a plot to take everybody's guns away so that we can impose marshal law -- >> not everybody -- >> -- is a conspiracy? yes, that is a conspiracy. i would hope that you would agree with that. [ applause ] >> is that controversial? >> and a colleague spoke with our political commentator
2:22 am
jeffrey lord. he asked if his reaction to mr. obama's performance at the cnn town hall. take a listen. >> i would just suggest here that the white house has made a mistake. they tried to make the nra the bad guy here for months and months and all the time he's been in office. then they want him to come to this. this was a cnn event. not a white house event. but i think that the -- the damage has been so severe here that there's just no trust. and that's not a good thing. >> and we should point out that jeffrey has a membership with the nra which is the large gun rights ad -- largest gun rights advocacy group in the u.s. we're learning about the former relationship between president obama and british prime minister david cameron british prime minister david cameron. hundreds of transcripts have been -- prime minister tony blair. hundreds of transcripts have been released showing how strong the friendship was away from the spotlight. here's our tom foreman. good morning. please be seated.
2:23 am
>> reporter: the two world leaders. always polished and cordial in front of the cameras, but the calls reveal a much closer relationship behind the scenes. obvious when princess diana died. >> they liked her. they loved her. >> reporter: while tony blair was publicly brave, privately he tells bill clinton, "i will tomorrowy miss her. it's like a star falling, it's awful. it's really awful," clinton responds. blair says, "we saw her again just weeks ago when we hosted her for lunch with prime minister. he's a great kid." clinton, "i worry a lot about those kids now." their conversations often revolved around world events. president clinton fretting after sending an unnamed messenger to saddam hussein. "i told him to go saddam, tell him i have no interested sb in killing him or wanting him down. i just don't want his chemical or biological program going forward. if i weren't constrained by the press, i would pick up the phone and call the son of a bitch."
2:24 am
he talks about boris yeltsin. and said of putin, "putin has enormous potential," he told blair. "i think he is smart and thoughtful. i think we can do a lot of good with him." >> i did have a relationship with miss lewinsky that was not appropriate. >> reporter: there were limits. days after the president admitted a sexual affair with a white house intern, he speaks to blair in a guarded manner. "i went in to massachusetts and did an event, it was great. i got to work a line and speak to a cheering crowds. there were thousands." blair, "good. i'm pleased." clinton, "this is my best state, you know. if i'd been in wyoming, they probably would have been shooting at me." in another moment, blair says, "i'm thinking about you." clinton says, "i'm slogging on. i think it will be all right." some of clinton's sharpest words are about the next u.s. president, george w. bush. "bush is really smart," he tells blair.
2:25 am
"he has right-wing foot soldiers do his dirty work so he can be nice." these days they're described as close as brothers. then clinton called him a fraud, adding, "he is not ready to be president, maybe not ever. certainly not now." as for the republicans, they hate us more than we hate them. they don't care as much about government. they just want the power." maybe foreshadowing his role in her current campaign for president, clinton praises his wife when she wins a senate seat. "hillary is doing great," clinton says. "happy as a clam. i'm really proud of her." blair, "she was just fantastic during the campaign. i thought she was just great." clinton, "yeah, she was the little engine that could." family talk dominates as lit is leaving office, and the blair -- as clinton is leaving office, and the blairs are preparing for a new baby. "clinton, "are you getting ready for fatherhood?" blair, "i'm psyched up." another time, clinton, "you know, after january, i'm available for baby sitting duties." blair, "right, bill.
2:26 am
we'll put you down on the baby sitting list now, mate." >> our tom foreman reporting there. we hope bill clinton can put that baby sitting option to use. he and wife hillary are due to become grandparents for the second time when their daughter chelsea gives birth in summer. coming up, the fallout from the chilling new year's eve attacks on women in germany. a live report from cologne ahead. plus, a bush fire that's destroyed more than 100 homes in western australia still burning. what firefighters face as they tackle the flames this weekend. when your type 2 diabetes numbers aren't moving in the right direction, it can be a burden. but what if you could wake up to lower blood sugar? imagine loving your numbers.
2:27 am
discover once-daily invokana®. with over 6 million prescriptions and counting, it's the #1 prescribed sglt2 inhibitor that works to lower a1c. invokana® is used along with diet and exercise to significantly lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. it's a once-daily pill that works around the clock. here's how: invokana® reduces the amount of sugar allowed back in to the body through the kidneys and sends some sugar out through the process of urination. and while it's not for weight loss, it may help you lose weight. invokana® can cause important side effects, including dehydration, which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up. other side effects may include kidney problems, genital yeast infections, urinary tract infections, changes in urination, high potassium in the blood, increases in cholesterol, or risk of bone fracture. do not take invokana® if you have
2:28 am
severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. stop taking and call your doctor right away if you experience symptoms such as rash, swelling, or difficulty breathing or swallowing. tell your doctor about any medical conditions, medications you are taking, and if you have kidney or liver problems. using invokana® with a sulfonylurea or insulin may increase risk of low blood sugar. imagine life with a lower a1c. are you loving your numbers? there's only one invokana®. ask your doctor about it by name.
2:29 am
watching tvs get sharper, you've had it tough. bigger, smugger. and you? rubbery buttons. enter the x1 voice remote. now when someone says... show me funny movies. watch discovery. record this. voila. remotes, come out from the cushions, you are back. the x1 voice remote is here.
2:30 am
hello, i'm lynda kinkade. here's an update of our top stories. the extensive manhunt for drug lord joaquin guzman, better known as el chapo, is over. mexican authority recaptured the fugitive in a predawn raid in the mexico city of los muchez. he had been on the run since tunneling out of a mexico security prison in july. a woman wearing a hijab was escorted out of a donald trump rally. she stood in silent protest as he linked syrian refugees to isis. she was shouted at as she was escorted out. paris marking one year since a deadly attack on a kosher supermarket that left four people dead. about half an hour ago, french president francois hollande unveiled a plan for a -- a plot for a police officer killed by the same gunman a day earlier. authorities say more than half of the men suspected in involvement in a mob sex attack in cologne were asylum-seekers.
2:31 am
at least 120 claims of sexual assault. angry protests been protesting germany's policy on accepting migrants. more protests are scheduled for today. atika schubert now live from colog cologne. as i mentioned, of the 31 suspects, more than half we know are asylum-seekers. no doubt that has fueled a lot of anger there. talk about the planned protests. >> reporter: absolutely. as you can imagine, it's shocked the country. many people now asking questions of the refugee policy here, but also the police in trying to determine exactly what happened that night. i want to run you through the square, where protests will be happening. that behind me is the train station. that is the cathedral. on new year's eve, this entire area was filled with people. hundreds of people. it's a popular area for tourist
2:32 am
and locals alike to celebrate all kinds of events. so we've already seen social media video of the area. it was chaotic. this were fireworks everywhere. it's clear police were under manned even though they had twice the number of police last new year's eve, it wasn't enough. what we're expecting today is protests, a number of them, on the steps. we're expecting to see a woman's protest happening at around noon. then later on, i expect to see a protest by the right wing anti-islamic movement. it will be happening on the other side of the station. we don't have a sense of numbers yet because that's happening later in the afternoon. we already know there have been daily protests gathering hundreds in anger against these apparent assaults against dozens of women. lynda? >> and as that anger grows,
2:33 am
chancellor merkel is talking about changing the law for asylum-seekers convicted of a crime. what is she proposing? what do you know so far? >> reporter: there's been a lot of pressure on her to limit the amount of refugee asylum seekers to migrants coming to germany. also to deport those, particularly those who commit crimes. this is what she's looking at, meeting with lawmakers from the cdu party as she's expected to give a press release in about -- about an hour and a half or so. she's likely to address this situation that happened here in cologne. she's been tough words saying no matter where anybody comes from, however they're admitted into the country, they must abide by german law. and the appropriate punishment will be given to those who don't. a lot of people jay are the arrest. there's only been a handful, only up to 30 or so suspect identified.
2:34 am
so it's very unclear if those involve today be brought to justice. >> a good point. we will check in with you very soon when angela merkel speaks. atika schubert, thank you very much for that report. germany opened its borders to a high number of syrian refugees as the civil war worsened last year. but many were still left behind. aid groups say that residents in a rebel-controlled town of 40,000 are starving to death. the area is west of damascus year lebanon. we show the desperate situation. first, i must warn you that the images in the piece are disturbing. [ crying ] >> reporter: the children of madaya are starving, the voice begs. the baby's eyes seeming to echo that desperate plea for help. a little boy says he hasn't had a real meal in seven days. and this baby, according to the video, has not had milk in a
2:35 am
month. cnn cannot independently verify these accounts or the images emerging from the town of madeya, under siege by regime forces and their allies since july. the last time aid reached the area was in october. even then the icrc said they saw hunger in the eyes of residents. doctors without borders say 23 patients have died of starvation including six babies. in the twisted reality of syria's war, it does have to get this grim for help to arrive. the u.n. says that the syrian government has agreed to allow aid convoys into the area and two other towns also under siege. >> this is an area that is completely besieged and surrounded by mountains covered in snow. the little food that gets to them is through tunnels and is extreme leexpensive. we expect -- extremely expensive.
2:36 am
and we expect irreversible damage to some of the children who have witnessed some of the worst weapons of war which is starving them. >> reporter: syria's cruel and harsh war now into its fifth year has seen scenes like this before and worse. these stills are being circulated by activists set to show children eating leaves. and it's hardly the only portion of the population severely suffering from the war. hardly the only atrocity. arwa damon, cnn, istanbul. still to come, north korea gives cnn an exclusive tour of its new science and technology center. but it's missing a key component. we'll explain that when we come back. hey, you forgot the milk!
2:37 am
that's lactaid. right. 100% real milk, just without the lactose. so you can drink all you want... ...with no discomfort? exactly. here, try some... mmm, it is real milk. see? delicious. hoof bump! oh. right here girl, boom lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort and for a creamy and delicious treat, try lactaid® ice cream
2:38 am
2:39 am
2:40 am
for the second straight date, south korea is blasting anti-pyongyang propaganda across the dmz at north korea. the loud speaker broadcasts started after the north claimed to have detonated a hydrogen bomb. in the past, the broadcasts have gone on for several days. on friday, north korean leaders said they are being pushed to the brink of war. meanwhile, north korea has released video of kim jong-un watching an apparent submarine missile launch. south korea claims the footage is old. the skepticism is not stopping north koreans from celebrating the hydrogen bomb claim. and cnn is the only u.s. broadcaster reporting from inside the reclusive country. north korean officials gave our will ripley an exclusive look at life there and its new science
2:41 am
facility. >> reporter: as the clock strikes midnight on kim jong-un's birthday, an eerie melody reminding north koreans of the sacrifices of their leaders. ♪ >> reporter: musical propaganda echoes through pyongyang every day, every night, reinforcing a message of loyalty to the supreme leader. on the front page of north korea's main state newspaper, kim jong-un signing the order to test what the regime calls a hydrogen bomb. many outside observers question the claim. there's no doubt among these students lined up outside pyongyang's science and technology center the north koreans said were the first to visit the building. >> a symbol of science. >> reporter: this north korean researcher believes this week's nuclear test ensures peace even as much of the world calls it a dangerous, provocative act. >> it is only for difference. >> reporter: do north koreans
2:42 am
want to be friends with americans? >> why knowledgenot? >> reporter: years of isolation began during the previous kim regimes. young future scientists, doctors, and other students have little or no access to the internet. only a state-controlled intranet. i see a lot of students doing research in the library. they're using north korea's version of the ipad. they study surrounded by photos of their leaders. and models of north korean weapons. >> it means that our nation is very powerful. >> reporter: medical students like this sit beneath a replica of a rocket that launched a north korean satellite into orbit. >> this is all for peaceful purpose. wouldn't want war. >> reporter: outside experts accuse north korea's space program of being a front for ballistic missile development, missiles that could someday carry nuclear warheads across the region or even the world. will ripley, cnn, pyongyang,
2:43 am
north korea. >> and pyongyang's nuclear claim is straining its ties with beijing which is north korea's main ally. on friday, south korea's foreign ministers spoke with his chinese counterpart reaffirming his opposition to the nuclear test. we have more. >> reporter: with a breathless report, north korea announced what said was its latest nuclear test. once again drew the world's ire. hydrogen bomb or not, the international community is condemning this latest action including china, a spokeswoman denouncing the test at a daily briefing wednesday. yet, china is north korea's only major ally, and it's because of that relationship that many suggest china has more influence than anyone else, including a certain u.s. presidential candidate. >> you know, they say they don't have that much control over north korea. they have total control because without china, they wouldn't be able to eat. so china has to get involved,
2:44 am
and china should solve the problem. we should put pressure on china to solve the problem. >> reporter: trump is right when he says that north korea heavily relies on its neighbor. for example, china has an abundance of food, while aid groups say north korea consistently faces shortages. china provides an economic lifeline to north korea by constantly sending food and fuel in order to keep the lights on and the people fed. the big question then -- will china use that leverage to force north korea to curtail its weapons ambitions. >> there's a raging debate inside of the chinese government about whether china should cut its losses and get rid of this alliance with north korea. so far, that has been the losing side. >> reporter: still, there are signs of growing tension. president xi jinping has never met his north korean counterpart, despite leaders from both countries regularly meeting in the past. china also says it was not warned of this latest test, something analysts called a
2:45 am
clear insult. to date, china has shown no signs of being ready to abandon the north korean dictator. consider the repercussions. if beijing were to cut aid and the regime collapsed, and that's a big if, china would have to deal with millions of refugee on its border, not to mention unsecured nuclear weapons. they would also lose a substantial buffer in its positioning in the region against the u.s. if china continues to prop up the regime, what else can be done to change north korean behavior? >> major countries in particular countries like china, the united states, and russia, need to get on to the same page as far as the nuclearization issue is concerned on the korean peninsula. and we should avoid the situation where dprk can play the united states against china. >> reporter: though if the countries agree on new sanctions to try to limit weapons development, it's unclear how effective those would be. what is clear is that with any further diplomatic action, china
2:46 am
will play the pivotal role. matt rivers, cnn, beijing. still to come, firefighters are working to tackle a massive fire that's tearing through a huge area in western australia. we'll have details on what they're dealing with just ahead. some cash back cards are, shall we say, unnecessarily complex. limiting where you can earn bonus cash back... then those places change every few months... please. it's time you got the quicksilver card from capital one. quicksilver earns you unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. doesn't get much simpler than that. what's in your wallet? i am a lot of things. i am his sunshine. i am his advocate. so i asked about adding once-daily namenda xr
2:47 am
to his current treatment for moderate to severe alzheimer's. it works differently. when added to another alzheimer's treatment, it may improve overall function and cognition. and may slow the worsening of symptoms for a while. vo: namenda xr doesn't change how the disease progresses. it shouldn't be taken by anyone allergic to memantine, or who's had a bad reaction to namenda xr or its ingredients. before starting treatment, tell their doctor if they have, or ever had, a seizure disorder, difficulty passing urine, liver, kidney or bladder problems, and about medications they're taking. certain medications, changes in diet, or medical conditions may affect the amount of namenda xr in the body and may increase side effects. the most common side effects are headache, diarrhea, and dizziness. he's always been my everything. now i am giving back. ask their doctor about once-daily namenda xr and learn about a free trial offer at namendaxr.com.
2:48 am
2:49 am
2:50 am
a bush fire in western australia has all but wiped out a town burning at least 120 homes and close to 60,000 hectares. 1 0 miles south of perth. thousands are without power after lightning started the fire on wednesday. four firefighters have suffered burns. now to the latest. allison, i understand firefighters have flown the eastern states to help battle this blaze. >> unfortunately, this was one of those fires that doubled in size overnight. even though they have some of the best firefighters for this type of event, whether it doubles that quickly, it's too much for firefighters to take care of it. they had to bring in additional resources. the good news, it's there. hopefully they can help fix the blaze or get it more contained
2:51 am
than it has been. the images coming out are absolutely incredible. here is one, again, you see the car that's going to be your frame of reference point. here are the flames, you see stretching higher than the tree behind me. again, it goes to show you the immense space that these fires take up and how quickly they can spread and grow. the fires are located in the southwest portion of the country. you see perth at the top. they have at least a couple of bush fires located on the south side of perth. the big cluster is well down far to the south. this is where we've had fires that doubled overnight in size. again, near the yarloop area. one thing that will help firefighters fight the blaze is the change of wind direction. the last couple of days, winds have come out of the northeast. that's going to change to a more onshore wind. that helps the firefighters because it tends to be more moist air than the dry, hot air that comes down continentally. we're talking about cold air in the united states.
2:52 am
frigid air pushing this cold air to the midwest and northern plains region of the united states. look at temperature. fargo, their average is minus eight. they'll be minus 21 degrees today. minneapolis average about minus five. they'll be minus 16 tomorrow. and the windchills not much better. we're talking windchills minus 18 to minus 25. one thing to note, tomorrow is when the playoff games for the nfl, the vikings versus the seahawks. this could go down as the coldest home game in vikings history. they're actually asking the fans to bring styrofoam or cardboard to set under their feet so their feet don't freeze. >> oh, my gosh. >> they're offering free hand warmers, though, if you enter the game. that's a perk. >> you want hand warmers, feet warmers. probably snow gear -- >> i don't know how many hand warmers it would take to feel warm at a game. >> especially sitting the entire
2:53 am
time. no thanks. >> me either. >> thank you very much. well, a designer in the u.k. has plenty of reasons to celebrate the success of the latest "star wars" film. each time a new movie is released in the franchise, andrew ainsworth makes money. he had to fight george lucas for years in order to reach this point. cnn's nick glass with more on the david versus goliath battle. >> reporter: not so long ago, not it should be said in a galaxy far, far away, something menacing emerged out of the whiteness and kept on coming. ♪ >> reporter: a production line of "star wars" stormtroopers. and a proud englishman stood on a patch of grass in the london suburbs and showed us his gleaming helmet. this is the guy who fought george lucas in the british
2:54 am
courts and won. how many courts did you go v to go through? >> three. the high court, appeal court, and the supreme court. >> reporter: and you won every time? >> we won every time. >> reporter: and he still has the same workshop he had when he helped on "star wars" precisely 40 years ago. george lucas was in preproduction on the first movie an hour or so away and wanted props quickly. ainsworth was given two small graphic images to work from. >> they were lovely. for someone like me, that's more than enough information to just -- i made in two days the helmet. >> reporter: two days? >> yes, from the molds and making the molding process work and getting moldings off. of course, you add to one mold and subtract from another mold. >> reporter: this is ainsworth's original metal resin mold from 1976. for almost 30 years, he forgot
2:55 am
about it until he needed money for school fees, made a few more helmets, and sold them. george lucas promptly sued him. >> because we honestly believed nobody can stop you from being the artist that you are, they can't out cut your hands off and say you can't use them. was that ridiculous to us. it's a no brainer, isn't? you have to defend it. >> reporter: the case lasted nine long years. ainsworth has only just paid off his huge legal bill. how much was it? >> i'd rather not say, but it was an awful lot. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands or millions? >> millions. >> reporter: the british ruling was that the helmet was a piece of industrial design, and so out of copyright so production could resume. the new "star wars" movie has caused demand to increase at least tenfold. and ainsworth is finally about to make some money. back in '76, 20 helmets. and now is. >> we sold 500 of originals. we do a copy at 200.
2:56 am
>> reporter: did you ever imagine it would turn out like this? >> no, of course i didn't. well, finally, a little urban nature story about owls hard to spot under the best of circumstances. one of the majestic predators was ready for its closeup last weekend in montreal, canada. look at this vision. the snowy owl soared past a traffic camera over an equally snowy highway. snowy owls are found in north america, europe, and asia. they have sharp claws and eat rodents, birds, and fish. the transports minister posted these images on his facebook page and have gained at least 19,000 likes. glad it missed the camera. thanks for joining us. for viewers in the u.s., "new day" is just ahead. and for everyone else, "amanpour" starts in a moment. does the smell of a freshly fill you with optimism?
2:57 am
do you love your wireless keyboard more than certain family members? is your success due to a filing system only you understand? does printing from your tablet to your wireless printer give you a jolt of confidence? if so, you may be gearcentric. someone who knows that the right office gear helps you do great things. and there's one place that has it all. office depot officemax. gear up for great. all the strength and freshness, now easy to lift! half the weight, smells great. find the litter that works best for you. every home, every cat. there's a tidy cats for that.
2:58 am
2:59 am
3:00 am
. the world's most wanted drug lord, el chapo, chaptured in a deadly shootout. breaking overnight. we now know where he's heading. plus, we're hearing from a family of a refugee arrested in texas with his alleged ties with isis. his wife, claiming his innocence. >> and at a donald trump event, a muslim woman kicked out and booed by the audience after standing in silent protest. your "new day" starts right now. >>

151 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on