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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  February 23, 2021 6:30pm-9:36pm EST

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and on the right-hand side and not just the security council for the western hemisphere. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2021] captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org they will come back to vote on renaming a post office in tupelo, mississippi. that is coming up. they take up a measure tomorrow expanding lgbt rights and will take the covid relief by thursday and possible apply votes into the weekend. live votes here on c-span.
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>> u.s. house coming back in momentarily. one vote. 6:30 on renaming a post office. fume, to suspend the rules and pass h. -- mr. mafume, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 208. the clerk: h.r. 208.
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a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 500 west main street suite 102 in tupelo, mississippi, as the colonel carlyle "smitty" harris post office. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> as the member designated by representative roybal-allard, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that roybal-allard will vote aye on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? ms. matsui: mr. speaker, as the
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member designated by mr. desaulnier, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. desaulnier will vote yes on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. huffman, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. huffman will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. grijalva of arizona, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. grijalva will vote yea on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? mr. jeffries: as the member designated by chairwoman zoe lofgren, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that chairwoman lofgren will vote
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yea on h.r. 208. as the member designated by congressman brandon boyle, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that congressman boyle will vote yea on h.r. 208.
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>> as the member designated by mrs. dingell, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mrs. dingell will vote yes on h.r. 208. and as the member designated by ms. pingree, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. pingree will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from kansas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. allred, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. allred will vote aye on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by congress member napolitano, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that congress member napolitano will vote yes on h.r. 208. and, mr. speaker, as the member designated by congress member vargas, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that congress member vargas will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mr. ruiz will vote yes on house -- as the member designated by mr. ruiz, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. ruiz will vote yes on house resolution 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. bilirakis, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. bilirakis will vote yea on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from connecticut seek recognition?
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mrs. hayes: as the member designated by ms. wilson, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. wilson will vote yes on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from new york seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. deutch of florida, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. deutch will vote yes on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition?
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>> mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. carter of the great state of texas, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. carter will vote yes on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from illinois seek recognition? -- the gentlelady from illinois seek recognition? ms. underwood: as the member designated by mr. rush, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. rush will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by -- [indiscernible] -- pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. wasserman schultz will vote yea on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from massachusetts seek recognition?
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ms. clark: mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. bowman, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. bowman will vote no on h.r. 208. as the member designated by ms. frankel, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. frankel will vote yes on h.r. 208. as the member designated by ms. meng, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. meng will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? mr. lynch: good evening, mr. speaker. as the member designated by mr. langevin of rhode island, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. langevin will vote yes on h.r. 208. thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? >> as the member designated by mrs. kirkpatrick pursuant to h. res. 8, i inform the house that mrs. kirkpatrick will vote yes on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. evans: mr. speaker as the member designated by mr. lawson of florida, pursuant to house resolution 8, i inform the house that mr. lawson will vote yes on
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h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? mr. beyer: as the member designated by ms. moore pursuant to h. res. 8, ms. moore will vote yes on h.r. 208. smigged mr. lieu, i inform the house mr. liu will vote yes. as the member designated by mr. lowenthal, i inform the house that mr. lowenthal will vote yes. as the member designated by ms. bar began, pursuant to h. res. 8, i inform the house that ms. bar began will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> as the member designated by by mr. gonzalez, pursuant to h. res. 8, i inform the house that
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mr. gonzalez will vote yes on h.r. 208. as the member designated by mr. cardenas, pursuant to h. res. 8, i inform the house that mr. cardenaswill vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, as the member designated by ms. bonnie watson coleman pursuant to h. res. 8, i inform the house that ms. watson coleman will vote yes on h.r. 208. as the member designated by mr. donald payne, pursuant to h. res. 8, i inform the house that mr. pape will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from missouri seek recognition? >> mr. speaker as the member designated by mr. gosar of arizona, pursuant to h. res. 8, i inform the house that mr. gosar will vote aye on h.r. 208. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from missouri seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, as the member designated by by representative hastings, pursuant to house resolution 965, i inform the house that mr. hastings will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> as the member designated by by honorable seth moulton of massachusetts, pursuant to h. res. 965, i inform the house the house that mr. moulton will vote yes on h.r. 208. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> as the member designated by seth moulton of massachusetts,
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pursuant to h. res. 8, i inform the house that congressman moulton will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> -- mr. buchanan, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that mr. buchanan will vote yea on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? >> thank you, mr. speaker. as the member designated by ms. porter, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms.
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porter will vote yes on h.r. 208. as the member designated by ms. stevens of michigan, pursuant to h.res. 8, i inform the house that ms. stevens will vote yes on h.r. 208.
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 406, the nays
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are 15. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas seek recognition?
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ms. jackson lee: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. jackson lee: madam speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: members, take your conversations off the floor. ms. jackson lee: thank you, madam speaker, just a few minutes ago, members stood on the steps of the united states congress realm nissing of the unity of this nation and the words of our pledge of allegiance we stand united. i offer words to the 500,000 lives taken by covid-19. the nation off the last 12
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months have faced suffering, death and disease that have taken too many lives and devastated the community and unemployment, loss of hilt care or information g gone and i continue to remember the 4-year-old boy who lost both of his parents or those who lost a mom, dad, husband or wife, children and yes, siblings. the news broke this nation has lost 500,000 more than world war i, world war ii, korean war and i come today toe this floor to say those who are lost, you will never be forgotten and their lives will not be in vein and those these are staggering and
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we should be able to ensure this moment. i end by a quiet moment of silence at this moment. with that, madam speaker, in this moment of silence, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. jarpgd for one minute. mr. thompson: i rise today to give a thank you to pep state students to an incredible cause. they spend raise awareness and money in the fight against pediatric cancer. this is a dance marathon. it provides emotional support for thousands much families across the commonwealth who have a child battling pediatric cancer. this gives an opportunity for
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chirp to be a kid even just for the weekend. sadly, the pandemic forced this proud tradition online this year. however the global pandemic students managed to raise $10.6 mill yop this year. since 1973, penn state students have raised $180 million. with 17,000 student volunteers make the largest fill and tropic effort in the world. i thank the students and more proud of the children and parents who keep fighting. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from georgia seek recognition? >> i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection.
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the gentleman is recognized. as we celebrate black history month and i honor trailblazer a sheriff, sheriff owen made history as the first african-american to be elected sheriff in cobb county. sheriff owens has served 30 years in the army, army national guard, army reserve and cobb county. he utilizes the skills that he gained from serving in our armed forces. i'm proud of the work he is doing to unite cobb county and instill faith and trustment. as one of his constituents and partner in service to cobb county, it is my honor and privilege to recognize sheriff owens. thank you. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore:p for what purpose does the gentleman
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from georgia seek recognition? mr. carter: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. carter: i rise today to remember and honor tom sepal junior who passed away on february 13. he had a heart for enriching the lives of children. after graduating from ohio state university, he moved to sule, south korea to teach english and returned to the u.s. to be a minister in kentucky and moved to nick rag wow where he provided meals and after school tutoring to the children. while there, tom taught at nicaraugua christian academy. in his final years he received treatment in georgia. he will live on for many years to come and i'm thankful for the
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impact he made on countless lives. i thank the love of his life and their daughter. thank you, madam speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, i rise to recognize the ma comb and oakland county students who participated in my inaugural 9th district youth conference. these students brought their vulnerable and selves to the table to zero in on what dr. king's life was really about, transforming society to be more just. covid-19 has exposed vull
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nerblets especially for black americans who are twice as likely as white americans to die of covid-19. imagine what we could do to end these disparities if we emyou might dr. king. they sponge up lessons on the true lessons achieving social justice and make plans to fight for change in their own lives and exupets i'm energized and hopeful that we bolster equality and justice in congress. i can think of no better way of marking black history month than that. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? >> i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise today to recognize perry mcclure basketball team who won the basketball team
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championship. after by trailing and they lived up to their name leading by two at half time. the coach told his team to go out and attack in the third quarter and attack they did outscoring, the blues opened up their lead. and mcclure pulled off the victory and the first ever boys' basketball championship and 12-1 record. i applaud the coach and the team. they overcame every obstacle. congratulations blues. your community is proud of your hard work. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from nevada seek recognition? >> i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection. gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. titus: i rise today in support of the equality act. for far too long our nation has failed to live up to the words that will adorn the united states supreme court that read equal justice under law. we have the rare opportunity to push our nation to live up to its founding ideals and make that phrase run true for all of americans. nol matter who you love under the equality act you will be guaranteed the same protections as everybody else. lgget about the shouldn't have to worry when they seek health care or buy a home. i'm proud to co-sponsor this civil rights legislation and i look forward to casting my vote in support of its passage. and i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? mr. lamalfa: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. lamalfa: i rise tobet in sadness to commemorate the loss of an american icon rush lum baugh, starting in sacramento, california within range of my tractor and my pick up out in the fields i was working at the time. i was really a breath of fresh air for radio, for a different type of talk, a different style and he inspired millions around the country for his many years on radio. he won't be replaced and he led the way for many others to take on that mantle that nobody will
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do it quite like rush limbaugh. he was recognized a year ago in this chamber by president trump with the medal of freedom. mr. limbaugh, always coming from strule a humble heart of what america was about and his love for his country and ideals. i know that many, many will miss him and glad to be honored todd help touch on his legacy. i yield back. ifment for what purpose does the gentlewoman from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to dress the house for one minute and revise and stepped my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise today on behalf of the millions of americans who continue to be denied housing,
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education, public services and much, much more because they identify members of the lgbt. americans like my daughter came out to her parents as a transgender. i knew my daughter would be living in most of the states she could be discriminated against and yet it was the happiest day of my life. and as any mother would i would swore to ensure this country without the equality act it will never live up to freedom and equality. the right to pass this act was decades ago. i'm voting very my daughter and the strongest and bravest person i know. i yield back. . .
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. davis: madam speaker, coming from illinois, it's often a question i get here in this chamber, why do you have a pin of the state of louisiana on your lapel? i have a pin on my lapel because there's a void, a void in this institution. because one of our colleagues wasn't able to get sworn in. luke let low would have made -- letlow would have made a tremendous member of this institution and i want to thank my colleague, mike johnson, and the entire louisiana delegation and what would have been his freshman class for honoring luke tonight in a special order. like luke, i was a district staffer for years, trying to make this house be a better place for every single american. i was looking forward to serving with him. unfortunately tragedy took his life and we are without his
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service. my heart goes out to his wife, julia, and their two kids and the entire state of louisiana and this institution for not having the opportunity to see the true leadership of congressman luke letlow. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 4, 2021, the gentleman from louisiana, mr. johnson, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. johnson: thank you, madam speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the subject of our special order. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. johnson: thank you. madam speaker, our special order tonight is to honor a dear friend, one of who -- one who would have been a colleague of ours here, a great tragedy.
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congressman-elect from louisiana passed away from complications due to covid-19 on december 29, 2020. he was only weeks away from taking the oath of office and searching here with us. he was 41 -- erving here with us -- serving here with us. he was 41 years old and otherwise the picture of health and energy and excitement and positivity. he was excited to serve with us here. his death came as a terrible shock to all the people of louisiana and to millions of people around this country. luke was known in louisiana for having a servant's heart. he had a peaceful nature about him, when he talked to a constituent or a friend or anyone, he made them feel they were the most important person in the world. he was one of those guys who was a great statesman and would have left a big mark here.
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i've also been encouraged since his passing to know that my friend was guided by his faith in christ. a good friend of ours told me shortly after his passing that luke was drawn even closer to the lord in his final days. in fact, he called this trusted prayer warrior to share briefly about an experience he had just a few nights before he passed away. luke said he felt the certain presence of god and his peace. luke letlow knew the truth of christ and the peace of his salvation and we all have taken great comfort in that. luke leaves behind his devoted wife, julia, and their two young children, jeremiah and jacqueline. his parents, johnny and diane letlow, his grandmother, mary taylor, his brothers, paul and matt and their families, and a huge network of people who were like family to luke and loved him as their own. he was raised in louisiana just
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east of monroe for the people who don't know the geography, it's northeast louisiana. throughout his entire adult life it was very clear how deeply he cared about the people of our state and those who lived in the fifth congressional district which is a sprawling 24 parishes, the largest by land area in our state. he worked for bobby jindal during jindal's stint here in the u.s. house and also later when bobby became elected louisiana's governor. luke also worked as chief of staff for his predecessor and our god friend, dr. ralph abraham. throughout luke's time in each of those positions, he made it a priority to work every day to benefit those that he served. he wanted to make life better for the people of his home state and in those efforts he worked closely with our farmers and the oil and gas industry and countless small businesses to ensure they were given every opportunity to succeed. judging from his accomplishments and remarkable record of public service, there is no doubt at all he would have made an outstanding member
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of congress. many people are aware now that there will be a special election in march, march 20, to fill that seat that he's left open. and we're delighted to tell you that his beloved bride, his widow, dr. julia barnhill letlow, will be running for that seat. we expect she'll be taking her place here shortly thereafter. she's a native of monroe, a dedicated mother and an education professional who has promoted for higher education, traditional family values and our quality of life in louisiana. we're excited to soon welcome her here and to fill the giant void that our dear friend and brother, luke, has left us. madam speaker, i'd like to yield to the gentleman from louisiana, another member of our delegation, mr. higgins, for so much time as he may consume. mr. higgins: i thank my friend and colleague. madam speaker, congressman
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elect luke letlow was -- congressman-elect luke letlow was called home far too soon. he was a friend. we were looking forward to our work together here in the people's house. and his passing was so sudden and unexpected that it caused many of us, certainly caused me , to reflect upon -- me to reflect upon my life and to be renewed in my determination to serve the people and to become a better man every day. because this is the kind of spirit that luke delivered to the world. he was a charming and brilliant man with a beautiful smile, a
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wonderful spirit, compassionate man, driven to serve. and i had the opportunity to break bread with julia, luke's wife, last week. and i saw in speaking to her that luke lives on, in the light in her eye, in her children and everyone that luke touched during the course of his life. so i'm prayerful that this child of god's presence will be felt, that representative-elect luke letlow's service will indeed be felt within this chamber. if we can just take a moment to seek that guidance that he clearly -- that he clearly
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pursued and listened to during the course of his life. and he brought that into those that he worked with and the citizens that he served. so i thank my colleagues for arranging this special order tonight. and i thank you, madam chair, for recognizing me and i yield. mr. johnson: i thank my friend from louisiana, mr. higgins, and we sat together at the funeral of luke and it was a great service. there was so many kind words said about him. he's remembered to just be the great spirit and the great louisiana homegrown talent that he was. madam speaker, i'm delighted to yield to the gentlelady from oklahoma who is also the freshman class president, the class that luke of course would have been a part of, mrs. bice, for such time as she may consume. mrs. bice: thank you, madam
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speaker. and thank you to the gentlelady from louisiana for yielding. i rise today -- the gentleman from louisiana for yielding. i rise today as the president of the 117th congress republican freshmen class to express our profound sadness that we all share for the loss of our friend and colleague, luke letlow. luke was a great american who was committed to serving his country and the people of his home state of louisiana. sadly, luke was taken from us way too early. you know, i never actually had the chance to meet luke. he was elected on december 5, which was the last day of the second week of new member orientation. but as a freshman class president, i felt it my duty to make sure that he felt included. by texting him, connecting him with other members, and making sure that he had all of his needs met as he joined this 117th freshman class. our entire class looked forward to being sworn in together on january 3 and we were devastated by the news of his passing on december 29 of 2020.
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we all know that luke would have been a tremendous addition and someone who would have made a positive impact on this great nation. i joint with all of my colleagues -- join with all of my colleagues in sending our thought it's and support to luke's family, including his wife, julia, son, jeremiah, daughter, jacqueline, and i'm keeping them all in my prayers. and it's interesting to see in god we trust above the speaker's chair because one thing i do know is that luke trusted god. thank you, madam speaker. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: i thank the gentlelady for her leadership and -- mr. johnson: i thank the gentlelady for her leadership and of that class and for her kind remarks. i'd like to yield, madam speaker, to the gentleman from texas, another leader from that class, mr. pfluger, for so much time as he may consume. mr. pfluger: thank you very much. madam speaker, i rise today to honor the life and legacy of my
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friend, luke letlow. luke and i spoke many times as we both prepared to enter congress. and we shared the privilege of both representing districts that are centered around a couple of very important things. faith, family, agriculture. and i look forward to serving with him and working together to better the lives of our farmers and our ranchers across the district and across the entire country. luke led a life of public service. it was a life that he helped the good people in the great state of louisiana from a young age, beginning as a young college graduate serving on the staff of congressman john cooksy, the representative of louisiana's fifth district at that time. he went on to serve the people in multiple capacities before launching a successful congressional bid of his own. he was a man of faith in jesus christ and he lived his life in
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accordance with his guiding principles. there's no way for us to know the thousands of lives that he has already touched before he entered into a plan to run for congress. and how many lives he touched in those years of service and the countless others who were blessed just by knowing him. there was nothing that he loved more than serving others and primarily his love of being a husband and a father, a husband to his wife, julia, a father to their two children, jeremiah and jacqueline. something that his legacy will live on forever in our hearts. today we give glory to god for his life and pause to reflect on that legacy which will live on through julia, jeremiah and jacqueline. my prayers are with all of them. his passing is a tremendous loss to this u.s. congress, to the state of louisiana and, more importantly, to his family and friends who loved him and
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cherished him. thank you and with that i yield back. mr. johnson: i thank the gentleman from texas. madam speaker, we have a few others from the class that luke letlow would have been proud to serve in. some of the rising leaders here and i'll just call them in no particular order here. i yield to another gentleman from texas, if he's ready, mr. fallon, for so much time as he may consume. faleomavaega thank you, representative johnson -- ms. fallin: thank you, representative johnson. madam speaker, i never had the privilege and blessing to meet luke letlow in person. mr. fallon: and to share our hearts and enjoy the blessed gift of fellowship. but to be honest, i still feel a bond and a connection and a friendship with luke because we were both married to beautiful, successful women, we certainly outkicked our
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coverage. we both had two children, we both chose public service and eventually ran for congress. luke left this world far too early. only 41. the scourge of an evil virus whose growth across the globe was fostered by the nefarious denial and negligence of a communist regime in beijing. . covid-19 has claimed millions. 500,000 here luke letlow, a man in his prime that had everything to live for is now gone. and it shouldn't be that way. he should be with us today and should be with us here voting, visiting, talking, learning and leading. the covid robbed this country
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and this chamber of luke letlow. this same scourge crossed my path 3 1/2 weeks ago and damn near killed me. i experienced the worth pain in my life with the virus and i thought i was going to die. prayers and terrific and medical care spared me. i'm going to talk frankly and from the heart. i'm consumed today right now this very moment. why is luke gone, why was i spared, why are 500,000 americans dead? i don't know. but i do have a strong pleef that we all have a purpose and the purpose everyone in this chamber the almighty has for us
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and we don't know what it is yet. and i feel i have been gifted and i want to know what i should do with those. how should i lead my life. we should all ask yourses that question and exercise the power that each of of us have in our soul to be kindler, jeptler and to smile when someone. it costs us nothing to do these things. we should live for others and above all, we should be loved and love t hmpymp neighbor. we want to honor luke letlow and honor his legacy and life rpgs then live and be swroyous and be kind and live with your heart
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and i'm going to try. that's what we are here for. and that's our purpose. let's acknowledge the pleasings and the very gift of life itself that life is short and it's delicate and it's fragile and taste free and also very beautiful. luke, we are praying for you, we miss you and love you and going to be for julia and your kids. i yield back. >> madam speaker, i next would yield to another classmate, the gentlelady from iowa for as much time as she may consume. >> good evening. tonight we are here to honor the life of luke letlow who was taken from us far too soon.
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he was dedicated to bettering the lives in louisiana and he severed the great people of the state great people of the people. he was a dedicated husband and a loving fast to two young children. we are all depreesk with them during this time, their entire family. i hope the letlow family can seek family knowing that people here in iowa and georgia and around the country are lifting up prayers for them every single day. and although luke is no longer with us he reminds us of a remarkable legacy and his two children will remember him by. so thank you, madam speaker, for speaking on behalf of our
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colleagues. and i yield. >> another bright light in this class is our friend from florida, the gentlelady from florida. i yield to her such time as she may consume. >> thank you. i rise today in honor of the life of luke letlow. as a member-elect of this freshman class, luke ms. wasserman schultz: one of us. we didn't get the privilege of serving along side him. i have no doubt that he would have been an energetic life. i have come to know the very best of what huke stood for and why he will be a member of this body. he ran the roots of the
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generations. he referred from ronald reagan whose vision transformed the republican party and the world to the parish to ensure residents received the services that local government was charged with providing. luke loved studying louisiana political history and read every out of print book that he could get his hands on. his passion for preserving the parish took him to documenting churches to building a website to chronicle the community. his love of america, louisiana and richland parish and motivated to pursue a career in the we honor his memory but moving forward we will embody
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his passion for our people, history and our nation. i ell yield back and i thank the gentleman. >> i'm delighted to introduce another member of the louisiana delegation in our special order and we are going in reverse order of seniority but representative graves. he knew luke very well and will bring some good thoughts to us tonight. mr. graves: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i zat here and listened to these people talk about luke. he was a red neck. there is there iconic picture of where he is wearing this hat and it says start fire and only thing that comes to mind is --
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luke was a good ole boy and in many instances that term is associated with negativity. that's not luke. luke was a force for good and he did that before the navy even coipped that term. i have known him for 15, 20 years. we staffed together up here in congress. we worked together in the governor's office in lea louisiana. and luke was always a workhorse.
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always. not a showhorse. luke was a public servant. he wasn't a politician. he had a heart for the public. he had a heart for fixing things and was good at it. luke brought folks together and he got things done. it was president a prejudice or discriminatory bone in his body. everybody was a friend. everybody luke met, he looked you in the eye and gave you that deprin, a little bit congresseyed and he wanted to know people and find out what you were about. he loved finding out about the background or ancestry and families and what they did and
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what they cared about. madam speaker, the people in the 5th district saw that as well. 24 parishes comprise the 5th district and luke won 23 of those. 23 of them. in the election. this district, his ped ceasor used to brag and ralph abraham used to brag that it has more acres than any other district. it was president a new york city or even new orleans. this was a rural area. and madam speaker, these were the people that luke had a heart for. i have never in my life been as excited as i was to have a colleague like luke.
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years and years ago, i said luke, if ralph abraham steps down you have to run. there are a lot of people up here who are good. luke would have been great. you look at this place and watch the network tv, the news and you wonder why in the world anyone, anyone would want to come do this. you have to question people's sanity how dysfunctional and how divisive this place is. one of the speakers hit it on the head when they said luke is exactly what we need. he is exactly what we need here. luke is a workhorse, not a showhorse. he doesn't care about your race or ethnicity or your political party. what he cares about is doing
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things right. luke's dream was to find a good life partner and knowing him when he was a little younger, many of us thought that was a lofty goal for luke. but man, he nailed it. julia, his life partner, his spouse, his wife, is just amazing and luke was just so excited and so giddy about that relationship. luke's dream was to be a good son. and he is. he's a great son and great brother and before i leave you with the wrong impression, his dad was the start of the vol up tear in start. i didn't mean to suggest i was -- [indiscernible] luke's dream was to be a member
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of congress, and did that, too. he won the election. his dream was to be a good father and to jeremiah and jacqueline, he loves them. absolutely loved them and his dream was to be a good christian and like all of us. luke was a difference maker. he didn't run for congress for the name recognition or the ego or for the popularity. he did this and ran to represent the underrepresented, to stand up for the communities like start, louisiana, and the people of these small communities so they would be represented. i will never forget when we were in the burial are are in the
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ceremony and seeing the water tower of stark right there in the background and this ominous side, all i could think about is luke doing what was right and wanting to be here because he cared and he was so genuine. people talk about term limits and term limits make a lot of sense. there are people that should be term limited after two months and term limited after 40 years. luke was one of those people that should be here for ever because you couldn't change his heart in caring for what is right. i want to thank my friend from louisiana for organizing this. absolutely well deserved filling
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the void of ralph abraham's void but luke was absolutely is up to that task and going to do an amazing job for julia, jeremiah and jackson. and luke is looking down and playing x-box or playstation and looking over this place and looking over his family that louisiana's loss was heaven's gain. god bless you brother. mr. johnson: thank you for your poignant words. it was recollections from close friends and sat there all afternoon. delighted to yield to the whip, my dear friend, one of the guys
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that helped guide luke's path to get here, steve scalise. . . mr. scalise: it is with a heavy heart i stand here today to pay tribute to luke letlow. just like earlier tonight when we stood out on the steps of the capitol to pay respects to the 500,000 people we've lost from covid-19, luke unfortunately is in that number. he's not somebody you would have expected. he was young. he was healthy. and he had his whole life in front of him. and he had already lived a rich life. he had left a powerful impact on people in the right kind of way, like my colleague, congressman graves, talked about. he had a big heart. madam speaker, he had a servant's heart. luke was the kind of person that you want to get into public service. to do it for the right reasons.
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to actually believe in something and want to make people's lives better. he would go through the rural communities of his district, a very rural district. he would just talk to people, strike up conversations. he's want to hear their stories and he'd want to help people. he had a lot of opportunities to do that, madam speaker. he started working for congressman john cooksie out of college at louisiana tech. he had already garnished a desire for public service. after he worked for congressman cooksy, i met him in 2004 when he was working on the campaign of my predsessdzor, bobby jindal. he got elected to congress, luke served with him there. when bobby got elected governor, luke went to serve with him in the state to make the state a better place. then when ralph abraham came to congress, luke spent the last six years working for ralph as his chief of staff.
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going around the rural parts of that district in northeast louisiana, just reaching out, finding out about people. he was very much into genealogy. he wanted to know not just about people but about their history. where they came from. what made people tick. and how he could keep making a difference. and then ultimately, when ralph retired, luke made that decision to run. and he didn't make that decision alone. his lovely wife julia was all in. they were a family that were a partnership. a true love story. two people who cared deeply about each other and who cared deeply about their young children. young jeremiah, young jacqueline who we also grieve for. it is heartbreaking when you think of the promise and what was lost. what we lost. we as colleagues. if -- there are members of his
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own freshman class who never got to serve with him. some may in the have met him, just knew about him and heard about him and miss him. that's kind of person that luke letlow was. i got to talk to luke a lot in those last few days, in the last few week, before he even got covid, he was so excited to come up here, get sworn in as a member of congress and start helping people in a different way. he had already helped so many people working for ore others. but now was his chance to make his own mark. he was talking about what committee he is wanted to be on. he wanted to serve on the agriculture committee. wanted to serve on the appropriations committee he will had big ideas. ideas that inspire other people to want to do better as well. and so, madam speaker, when we remember luke lethe, -- luke letlow, it's that big smile luke had, it's the servant's heart,
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the heart of a person who cares about other people an wanted to make a difference for all the right reasons. thank god we still have people like luke letlow who care enough to want to get into public service for the right reasons. it's said we -- it's sad we didn't get the opportunity to serve with him. i so looked forward to serving with him as a colleague in the louisiana delegation. he was only five days away from getting sworn in when we lost him. so madam speaker, as we remember the life of luke letlow, i know he's up in heaven looking down. he was a man of deep, deep faith that faith carried him and his family through those difficulties in the last few days when he was struggling and fighting for his life. i know that faith is what got him into heaven. he'd probably be looking down saying, y'all shouldn't be making such a big fuss. but you know what? he deserve this is kind of tribute. this would have been a richer body if we had luke letlow but we all remember him and keep him in our thoughs and prayers.
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i yield back to the gentleman from louisiana. mr. johnson: i thank the whip for those remarks an his great leadership, i know luke appreciated that as well. madam speaker, i would like to yield to the gentlelady from colorado, ms. bobeert, for as much time as she may consume. ms. bobeert: thank you to the gentleman from louisiana, -- ms. bobeert: thank you to the gentleman from louisiana. i rise to honor the legacy for congressman-elect luke letlow. his tireless work for community, passion for public service an love for his constituents will long be an inspiration to many, many americans. he spoke glowingly of the mighty mississippi and his district's rich louisiana soil. both of which flew freely from his veens as he passionately
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ad-- from his veins as he passionately advocated for the people who elected him to be their voice. his life of service, working for governor bobby jindal, serving as chief of staff to congressman ralph abraham and then successfully running for congress himself exemplified his commitment to win the day. congressman elect letlow shared my great love for our western states and he was a fierce advocate for the issues facing everyday americans. his calling to public service was only surpassed by his calling to be a loving husband, father, brother, and son. he cared deeply for his beloved wife julia, son jeremiah, and daughter, jacqueline. after he won his race, congressman-elect letlow's wife julia spoke of god's sovereignty over the life of her husband. quoting the words from
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scripture, before i formed you in the womb, i knew you. before you were born, i set you apart. god set luke apart with a calling, with an anointing, and that same calling and anointing is now on that godly heritage he has left behind. god's wraparound presence is surrounding the letlow family. god's plan for luke's life was one of service. his legacy will live on through his family. his wife julia is a woman of deep faith. a calling to public service is on her life. and she was his rock for all of his years in public life. i'm honored to call her my friend now. may his family find comfort in the words of scripture, the lord is close to the brokenhearted. and in knowing that congressman-elect letlow fought the good fight, finished his
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race and kept the faith. thank you and i yield back. mr. johnson: i thank the gentlelady from colorado. madam speaker, that was very appropriate. i was i was gick to cite the same scripture. i will just say this as we close tonight. the night we got word of luke's passing was december 29. the word, the phone call we got shook my whole family as it did everyone in the state. as we were putting our children to bed that night, i remember -- i reminded my youngest son, my 10-year-old that while grief is part of life the lord grieves with us. and as lauren said he remains close to the broken hered. so many are mourning his loss so many remain brokenhearted. i will close with these words if the apostle paul as he rote in romans 8. for i am convinced that neither death nor life, neither height or depth nor anything else in all creation will be able to separate us from the love of god
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that is in christ jesus our lord. luke believed that, he lived it, he would want us to remember it too this concludes our special order tonight and i yield back to the chair. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 4, 2021, the gentlewoman from missouri, mrs. hartzler is recognized for the remainder of the hour as the designee of the minority leader. mrs. hartzler: thank you, madam speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection; so ordered. mrs. hartzler: i want to thank my friend, the gentleman from louisiana, for that very heart felt time recognizing mr. letlow
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and his family to and our hearts are with them and we move on to another topic that is also very, very important to all of us and to america. and it deals with a bill that is on the floor right now, this week. and it's shamefully called the equality act, but it shreds the principles of protecting our children, in fact, under this bill, children beginning with the womb will be targeted and victimized. under this bill, children in a classroom will be bombarded with unscientific, confusing materials questioning the reality of their biological sex. under this bill, children struggling with gender dysphoria will be pushed toward medical treatments and even surgical procedures which will disrupt their natural development and may leave them sterile and physically altered for life.
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under this bill children's privacy will be violated when locker rooms, restrooms and homeless shelters will no longer be single sex. under this bill, parents may face custody battles for making healthy, wholesome choices for their children's health. this scenario was not hypothetical for the ohio couple who lost custody of their daughter for not affirming hormonal treatments. under this bill, foster care and adoption agencies would force to shutter and this is just the tip of the iceberg. the so-called equality act jeopardizes the well being of our children. it jeopardizes the role of parents, the privacy and safety of vulnerable women, the competitive edge of female athlete, the livelihoods of charities an businesses and the integrity of our health care system. we demand better for our children and their futures. and we will not be silent. we are here tonight to expose the equality act for what it is.
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a far-reaching policy that will upend all aspects of life and turn basic decency and commonsense into discrimination. i appreciate my colleagues who have joined me tonight to let america know why this bill must be defeated. and so, madam speaker, first i would like to yield two minutes to my friend and colleague, the gentleman from maryland, who is a practicing anesthesiologist, dr. an diharris. mr. harris: thank you very much, madam speaker, this bill, the equality act is nothing more than an identity politics sellout. a thinly veiled attempt to attack and co-ers is individuals who hold serious, legitimate concerns or objections to things like parental rights to make health care decisions for their children. the ability of women to compete on an equal athletic playing field. and even medical procedures like sterilization and abortion.
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i'm a physician. i've been practicing medicine for over 35 years. this bill, if enacted, would mandate that health care practitioners and even facilities like catholic hospitals, would be forced to provide and participate in procedures like abortion which ends a human life. we should all be able to agree that a catholic hospital should never be compeled by the government to offer procedures like abortion that they morally object to in the strongest possible terms. furthermore, as society continues to support politically correct gender identity politics, the science is becoming clearer that gender dysphoria, especially in children, is a psychiatric condition that in most cases will resolve itself with time. instead, however this bill would require parents to allow irreversible medical interventions for their
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children. children who may even be prebue pugh bestent. resulting insterization and oftentimes later regret. scientific data confirms that many who undergo gender transition continue to deal with serious depression, even after full transition. and the poorly named equality act would have medical professionals to support their patients to undergo these procedures even if they have objections. i will be reintroducing the conscious protection act. and being required to perform abortions and allow them to without coerce from their employer or patients. i urge my colleagues to co-sponsor and i oppose the
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so-called equality act on the floor this week. and i yield back. mrs. hartzler: i thank you for your thoughts on this matter. i yield my time to the gentleman from colorado, mr. doug lamborn. mr. lamborn: i thank the lady from missouri for her courage and backbone in supporting these vital issues. i rise to speak on the dangers of h.r. 5, the so-called equality act. this bill would have disastrous effects on our culture. it would turn the civil rights on its head it would harrass individuals who are seeking to hold their beliefs. faith-based businesses and businesses would crease to
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exist. i'm not sure they understand the consequences. churches could be forced to violate their beliefs to stay open if it were enforced as written. this awful legislation creates inaqualities for many americans. parents would live in fear that their young daughter would have to use the same locker room as a man because it would op the door to biological mails identifying as females. i introduced an amendment to designate private single-sex spaces. i hope that the democrat majority allows a vote that tense of million of american parents won't. it would disadvantage woman
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participating in sex-specific sports league haven't i have introduced an amendment originally filed as a bill last congress by democratic representative gabbard protecting equal opportunities for women and girls in high school and college sports. this amendment of mine seeks to protect women and girls wanting to compete against biological women and girls. women and chirp suffer when democrat policies are enacted. women sports and the girls and young women who want to compete with other females will be the victims of democrat policies. i oppose the radical equality act and i hope my colleagues on both sides of the aisle will take a stand and oppose it as well and i yield back. mrs. hartzler: thank you. that is great remarks and so
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much common sense there. i would like to yield to my friend, emergency room physician dr. mark green free tennessee. mr. green: i thank the squished gentlelady from missouri for her leadership on this important issue. as a physician i know this bill h.r. 5 will force medical providers to surrender convictions to dog mas. according to the radical activist into civil rights law, the only appropriate treatment for a child struggling with gender is gender reassignment. such procedures often lead to irreversible damage. but under the equality act medical providers who object to performing these will face liability if they refuse to
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comply. every facility receiving any federal money comply or shut down. if h.r. 5 becomes law, a doctor who refuses to perform an operation on a teenaged girl will be held liable for violating the federal law. h.r. 5 goes so far as tore exempt itself from long-standing bipartisan federal religious liberty protections both congress and the supreme court have consistently upheld. a catholic hospital, following the commappeds of scripture to serve the frail and the poor will be forced to violate their faith to comply and do abortions. as a physician, i took a oath to do know harm and preserve the ole.
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if this bill becomes law doctors will go against their conscience and medical judgment. this is a death sentence for medicine. biology is not bigotry and medicine is not discrimination. all americans who do not wish to see medicine should stand up and oppose this bill. i yield. mrs. hartzler: thank you, dr. green. biology is not bigotry. seems like common sense but we are not talking about common sense and let the american people know about the ram physicals, the ramifications of this bill and prime proud to be joined by another doctor, dr. bab on the who is from texas and what it will mean to americans.
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mr. babin: i thank my colleague from missouri. i rise in objection to the equality act. once again under the guise of equality, the left is prioritizing its over religious freedom and the safety of women and girls. as the father of three daughters and grandfather of nine granddaughters i'mout raged at the ault that this bill is on women in sports. i'm infuriated that it's plate ant attack on the religious freedoms of those in the health care industry. this bill isn't about forcing medical professionals to abonn to comply with the left extreme views on gender. it would prohibit physicians from counseling children with
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gender diss for yeah and would be required to have puberty cross-sex hormones. this mandate contradicts science. these treatments compound the children's confusion. the catastrophic effects leave children scarred and often render them sterile. it is nothing short of child abuse. the left will not tolerate its view. they have explicitly state that the freedom restoration act does not apply to this new definition of sex. physicians refusing to perform these treatments would be punished and if they refuse, the equality act its another attempt by the left to promote its
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radical agenda. we must fight for the conscience rights and religious rights and we must stop our children from being used as pawns in the game of political correctness. i yield back. mrs. hartzler: well said. i would like to yield time to the gentlelady from minnesota, the first female president of the minnesota senate. mother of two and grandmother of five. >> thank you for putting this together and i appreciate the opportunity and making sure the people in the country understand what is in this bill and i rise in opposition to house -- h.r. 5, the so-called equity act. the reality of this bill is anything but equal but nothing more than an attempt to force
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unis reasonable mandates on our institutions and restrict the liberties of the american people. if this becomes law americans can expect limits on the free exercise of legal gouse liberty, businesses forced to cover the cost of abortion and medical providers to perform abortions. unfortunately, this is just the tip of the iceberg. today, i rise to speak on behalf of pro life americans in my district and across the country who fear this legislation will be man lated by the radical left and create abortion right up to the moment of birth. majority of americans support restrictions on abortion including making sure that taxpayer funds are not used for
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abortion. this bill will impose a top-down abortion mandate that interferes with the state and federal laws that protect the right to life and will force medical providers to participate in abortion procedures even if it goes against their own sincerely held beliefs. the previous administration made great strides in protecting religious liberties of all americans. the new administration doesn't cherish. this bill will real debate the view to discrimination and redefine gender and require faith-based employers to pay for abortions. i oppose this legislation on behalf of the unborn who do not have a voice. i oppose this legislation on behalf of my constituents, many
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of who believe this is in conflict with this bill's radical ideology and i oppose this bill on behalf of millions of americans who no that life is a god-given life. i oppose this bill and i ask members to do the same and i yield back. mrs. hartzler: life is precious and jeopardized under this very poor bill. so thank you for raising those points. i yield time to the gentlelady from colorado, volunteer ms. lauren boebert. mrs. boebert: the equality act, equality for who, madam speaker? where is the equality in this legislation for the young girls across america who have to look behind their backs as they change in their school locker
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rooms just to make sure there is president a confused man trying to catch a peek. where is the equality for women hob been sexually assaulted. their crisis counselor who is born alex and will have to talk to him about their assault. why is the equality for peernts? who want and deserve the right to raise their children free from government overreach? under this proposal, congress seeks to replace moms and dads with bureaucrats. this is nt high per bowle. in ohio, a mom and dad had their child removed because they didn't allow their daughter, removed from their custody and here we are. the left will lay down the
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rights and securities of millions of americans particularly young women at the altar of gender jideology. following the lead of liberal indoctrineation camps called colleges and universities, my colleagues on the left are committed to advancing this ideology. the rights and sovereignty of individual states be darpped. so much for federalism. the power hungry left will not slow down until every school, every church, every workplace and every state and every community adheres to the left definition of gender. you disagree? they'll find you. they'll imprison you or as we have seen, they'll even take your children. and let's make sure the american people know this is only the
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beginning. the equality act requires doctors to perform abortions and going to use your tax dollars to pay for them. once the left codifies their ideology, they'll come for their speech. it has happened in canada where you can be fined and imprisoned. they won't stop there. nothing will ever satisfy the left until there is complete and total compliance. madam scripture says when speaking of those who turned their back on god, who have traded the truth far lie, professing to be wise, they became fools. i can think of no bet edescription of the so-called equality act, or inequality act, than this. the utter foolishness. it's astounding. up is down. wrong is right. left is right. boys are girls and vice versa.
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madam speaker, for the sake of our sons an daughters, for the sake of parental rights, privacy, decency, and so much more, i urge my colleagues to vote no on this horrendous legislation. i yield back. mrs. hartzler: thank you, that was so well said. up is down, right is wrong. our last speaker is a doctor, dr. virginia foxx -- doctor of education, dr. virginia foxx. i want to thank representative rick allen for being here as well who objects to this bill. dr. foxx, please share in closing why we should oppose this bill this week. ms. foxx: i thank congresswoman hartzler for yielding. our first amendment is a powerful instrument that has protected our most sacred freedoms for hundreds of years. few other countries provide the same protections an freedoms our
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first amendment guarantees. yet today these essential rights are under attack. h.r. 5 is the latest example of democrat's misleading and partisan manner of legislating. as former educator and head of the education and labor committee, the bill may have equality in the title but it does not serve in all americans. it would empow they are government to interfere in how americans think, speak and act. it would amend the sieve rights act of 1974 to make sexual orientation an gender identity protected class. this redefines sex to include gender identity, undermines religious freedom, gives males who identify as females the right to women's spaces an sets a dangerous political precedent for the medicalization of gender-confused youth. our nation's k-12 schools will
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be forced to treat gender as being fluid, subject i and not tied to biological reality. the speaker pro tempore: the time has expired. ms. foxx: i yield back. mrs. hartzler: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 4, 2021, the gentlewoman from ohio, mrs. beatty, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. mrs. beatty: thank you, madam speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include any extraneous materials on the subject of this special order hour. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mrs. beatty: it is with great honor that i rise today to open our first congressional black caucus special order hour. first of this year. during black history month. utilizing the fullest extent
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possible of our power, our message. i would like to thank the congressional black caucus members for having the confidence to elect me to be chairwoman during the 117th congress. i stand on the shoulders of greatness as i acknowledge the past members and chairs for their tremendous leadership. for the next 60 minutes, we have an opportunity to speak directly to the american people about the issues of great importance to the congressional black caucus and the millions of constituents we represent. tonight's special order hour topic will serve as part of a rollout of our policy agenda and celebrate our 50th anniversary in the context of the many critical issues facing black -- the black community. the congressional black caucus kicked off black history month, madam speaker, with the powerful
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trayvon free film, "two distant strangers," a moving story about a young black man caught in a george floyd type of nightmare with his local police department. during tomorrow's c.b.c. meeting, to be held at 12:00 noon, the living black history vignette featuring all 58 members of the c.b.c. will be unveiled to the public via facebook, brio and my youtube page. we are also hosting a virtual screening of the lee daniels film "the united states versus billie holliday" tomorrow evening. in that spirit, late they are week, i will be introducing the black history is american history act to close out our black history month. this year marks the 50th anniversary of the c.b.c.
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with the largest c.b.c. group ever. 58 members who represent the diversity, hope, and promise of this great nation. it's been stated before and it certainly bears repeating, the c.b.c. is commonly referred to as the conscience of the congress. over the decades has forcefully advocated on policies that our nation cares about. ranging from economic justice and reparations, health care, voting rights, consumer protection, education, fair policing, and far beyond. the killings of breonna taylor, ahmaud arbery, george floyd drew america closer to another watershed moment last year. amid a pandemic that's disrupted life as we knew it, triggering an intergenerational cross-path
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collective of people demanding change, which led to the passage of the george floyd justice in policing act, a bill that is the first ever bold, comprehensive approach to hold police accountable, change the culture of law enforcement, empower our communities, and build trust between law enforcement and our communities by addressing systemic racism and biases to help save lives. i also wear another hat, and that is as chairwoman of the diversity and inclusion subcommittee of the house financial services committee. though it may speak for itself, i appreciate that kind of transformative change which we seek in the sphere of policy, legislation, and regulation that will hopefully result in building a record that we can
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use as we promote diversity and inclusion in our democracy. as c.b.c. founder/member bill clay noted, we have no permanent friends or enemies, just permanent interests. the c.b.c.'s priorities will allow us in many instances to work with the boyden administration to deliver relief to our constituents who have been so devastated by covid-19 pandemic and to work on long-term plans for recovery. to that end, we are so pleased that we will announce our domestic policy team tomorrow as we have met with ambassador susan rice who is head of the biden policy domestic team. it is so important that i end by saying, the con gregal black caucus is committed to dramatically reversing these alarming trends by working with our community leaders,all lies,
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colleagues in congress, to pass critical legislation in working with the biden-harris administration to encourage possible responsible executive branch policies in action using our power, our message. now i am honored to announce our c.b.c. anchors for tonight. congresswoman sheila jackson lee , a scholar, a strategist, an orator. a woman who has sponsored legislation and helped craft much of the changes that we will be talking about through the 117th congress. and i am equally as proud to say that the special order hour will be co-chaired by her co-anchor, congressman richie torres, a freshman, a member of the financial services committee, a
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giant in public housing legislation, and tonight, you will hear from them. madam speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 4, 2021, the gentlewoman from texas, ms. jackson lee, is recognized for the remainder of the hour as the designee of the majority leader. ms. jackson lee: thank you, madam speaker. let me thank our ill lust res you chair of the congressional black caucus whose visionary leadership is going to carry us into the 117th congress. congresswoman joyce beatty acts legislatively on her history. she's from ohio. one of the major stops of the underground railroad. in fact, cincinnati, ohio, has one of the most monumental monuments, if you will, to that
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freedom train, that courage, that harriet tubman, and i might say that our chairwoman bears her actions are in resemblance of harriet tubman. we are grateful for her vision. and we will, tomorrow, at the congressional black caucus, unveil the talent of tens upon tens of members of the congressional black caucus and lay out our legacy, our message, and our power, our power and our message. i thank the gentlelady for her leadership. it is as well my honor to be able to co-chair this, if i might, with a degree of familiarity, the brother from the bronx. i am delighted that a working man's and woman's representative has come to be able to shine.
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a man who is a product of public housing, public school, public hospitals, and who had a dream of lifting out his commun and building back a better bronx. i'm delighted that at 25, against all odds, he became the youngest elected official in new york city and first openly lgbtq elected official from the bronx. he doesn't know that his reputation preceded him as a dynamic, get-her-done person. so i will repeat his motto, before i begin my remarks, and that is, richie torres' remarks an life motto is as follow, my motto is life is simple. my motto is life is simple. if you do nothing, nothing will change. what a piercing message for all of us, republicans an democrats,
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to do something good. my motto is, that is if you do nothing, nothing will change. and we can build a better bronx and we will do it together. i'm delighted to co-anchor with mr. richie torres for the 117th congress. i now, madam speaker, will indicate that i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include any extraneous material on the subject of this special order. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. jackson lee: i am particularly delighted to again my remarks as i continue to weave in and out tonight and then with my rashes, i will yield to mr. torres as well. this is a moment in history.
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tonight, we will explore honoring our 50-year legacy, our power, our message. as i was flying up today, i was very happy to find on the movie list on an airplane "good trouble." the movie about john lewis. which so many members telling their story. but i think i'll just simply say, good trouble. tonight we hope to exemplify good trouble. as we honor the 50-year legacy of the congressional black caucus. and emphasize our power, our message. we want to be in good trouble. i'm honored in the 117th congress to chair the crime, terrorism and homeland security committee. and serve as senior member on judiciary. where in addition to the power of the congressional black
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caucus, we will seek to have justice rain down like righteous waters. we will do that, however, with the 55 members of the congressional black caucus and i think our numbers are higher than that. and they are all on different committees. amazing. they will pierce the seams of equality and justice in the 117th congress. so we will have our we will have our past and our future. let me talk about where we are. 400 years ago ships is sailed from the west coast of africa and there was inhumane practices. prl 4 million africans were enslaved and became the united states from 1619 to 1865. the institution of slavery,
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constitution was sampingsed by the government of the united states from 1789 to 1865 and american slavery is our original sin. you will hear from the remarks how out of this ashes of enslaved africans, out of the toll of death from those held in bondage, out of the heroes that fought in the civil war that rose out of the south and north and came and pled for this nation. out of that death toll of americans, fighters who happened to be present and former slaves and suffered indig nights and continued in the end of the 1800's and into jim crowism, you will find those who have climbed and claude their way to leadership.
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of course, there will be those who will say, there is no need for an apology which is part of h.r. 40, no need for a commission because you have overcome. in fact. this caucus was founded by overcomers. and an array of talented men and women who themselves were the corner stone of democracy and legitimacy. who would ever forget the honorable shirley chisholm, the first one to run for the presidency and plaque woman never to be daunted, never to be rejected, never to be denied. or william price who chaired the labor committee, the first plaque man or second, i believe, to do so. george w. collins, a pioneer and
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power house out of chicago, illinois. john conyers and the first man to hire or the first member to hire rosa parks and the member of congress is his distinction alone to have dr. king endorse him. ron dell a.m.s, he was told you sit in the chair in the armed services committee. we aren't interested of you being here and ron rose to be chair of the armed services committee. how big. the leading man on. hawkins, the leading man on the empowerment. again, ralph metcalf, pioneers, elected plaque member of
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congress. mitchell, the father of. robert c. nics a pioneer out of pennsylvania. charles rangel who rose up from the streets of harlem. l omp u stokes, a major force on the appropriations committee and delegate font roy who i have met in south carolina with the commitment to defeat a segregationist who chaired the committee. overcomers, but each of them will say that this definition of who we are should not be on the few. it should be on the many. that means that we as members of the congressional plaque caucus stand here to be here to call as our mandate our challenge, our
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power, our message is to be able to lift the opportunities of all african-americans and plaque people and people of color as we work to ensure that anyone who is denied equality has us, we, the collective body politic as their champion. that is what tonight is about. you will hear a number of descriptions of many persons and you will hear the words of many of us in different parts of the country and i'm delighted to be able to preside and as i do so at this moment, i am pleased to be able to yield to the distinguished gentleman from the bronx, from new york, congressman torres. mrs. torres: it's an honor to rise and celebrate the 50th
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anniversary,. i'm honored to be the presence of fierce and formidable public servants like the c.b.c. chair joyce beatty and congress member jackson lee. thank you for reminding us of the long and rich history of the c.b.c., the history that continues to inspire us all and i'm honored to be in the presence of my brother. the history of the united states congress, there have only been 163 plaque members of congress and none of them were openly lgbt until the election of jones and myself and and i'm proud to join my brother in making history in the 117th congress. before i was congressman ritchie
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torres, before i was couple man ritchie torres i will and always will be the son of the most powerful woman i know, my mother. and the most important lesson that my mother taught me was never forget where you come from. never forget where your loots lie. and my roots are in the bronx. even when i heave the bronx for washington d.c., the bronx never leaves me. i was born and bred and battle tested in the booingey-down bronx and i have the high honor of representing the south bronx which for too long has been ground zero for racially concentrated poverty. the unemployment rate could be as high as 25%, exarle to the
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joblessness of the great depression. more than half of the residents in the bronx pay more than half of their income toward their rent and that is before you factor in prescription drugs and utilities and food and all the bare necessities of you life. and even the south bronx has been the poorest congressional district in america, covid-19 has shown the south bronx to be the essential coverageal district. home of essential workers who put their lives at risk during the peek of the pandemic so most of us can shelter in place. and our mission as the c.b.c. should be to give those essential workers who are overwhelmingly of color a fighting chance at a decent and
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dignified life. i never thought as a poor kid of color from the bronx that i would embark on a journey that would take me from public housing to the people's house in washington d.c. and i never thought that as a congress member i would live through an snurks against the you -- insurrection against the u.s. capitol. on january 6, we were reminded there were two competing realities that define america, the reality of racial democracy. america is slowly emerging as multi racial and ethnic inclusive democracy. 70% of the democratic caucus consist of women and members of
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the lgbtque and then there is the reality of white spremssi that reared its ugly hid on january 6. for me the siege on the u.s. capitol was not an an attack on a physical structure. it was an attack on the very idea of america as a multi racial democracy and it is that vision of america that we as the c.b.c. are charged with defending. and despite the overwhelming shock and despair i felt on january 6, madam speaker, i have hope. the inauguration was hope. the image of kamala harris, a plaque woman in the vice presidency being sworn by the
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justice sotomayor is an encapsuleation of how far we have come and how much we have achieved. and that moment reminds us that the future of our country does not belong to white spremssi. the future of our country belong to multi racial democracy. and the congressional plaque caucus will continue to be at the forefront of making america the more perfect multi racial union that it ought to be. in the words of the c.b.c. chair, our power, our message. i yield back my time. ms. jackson lee: let me thank the gentleman for his powerful words and his very prominent focus on the idea that you are
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from the bronx, but the spirit of the bronx cannot be taken from you and that your commitment and your assessment of this country will be defined in your way, not in the way of white supremacists, or insurrectionists and i think more than ever you have captured the important moment by saying you have hope. and that is what the congressional plaque caucus represents for the millions of americans that we represent and you are right. our constituency is multi cultural. they come from many different perspectives. they are black, they are african-america as they want to be called, they are white,
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southeast asian, asian-pacific, lgbtque and they are varied. and that is what we are here today to stand for. let he me now yield to the distinguished member of the judiciary committee, among other committees, a scholar in his own right, a lawyer, as someone who has been able to be trained in the ways of the law, but whose heart is vested in the ways of justice. i'm delighted to yield to my colleague for his time on the floor in this wonderful moment of this occasion. i yield to the gentleman. >> thank you to the distinguished co-chair of this incredible special hour
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sponsored by the congressional plaque caucus for those very kind words. as someone who has spent his life, it is an honor to join the legends who inspired my own run to the united states congress. madam speaker, i want to thank the c.b.c. to reflect on plaque history. i want to share a story of a young lawyer who came to the village in rockland county, new york to desegregate our schools. like many places, the hillburn school. and it hadal school for children of color without a play grouped or indoor plumbing. that was the brooks school but
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our elders did not see accept this. they organized and with the help of a young attorney and nmp arch arch crmp p legal defense fund they sued the district. . . . they helped lay the groundwork for board v. education. and who was this young lawyer who came to the village of hilber? the man who would later become our nation's first supreme supreme court justice who was black, thurgood marshall. i am moved by the story because it shows how black history creates black futures. have the courage and resistance of the black leaders of years past are the reason a poor black kid from rockland county
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now stands in this special chamber as a united states congress member representing that same school district today. i yield back. ms. jackson lee: a powerful statement. obviously a lawyer's lawyer to bring to our attention the great leadership of justice thurgood marshall, a civil rights attorney, thurgood marshall, from a lawyer who we know will continue to promote justice now as a legislator. congressman jones, thank you so very much for that powerful statement. let me introduce into the record at this time a statement on behalf of chairwoman eddie bernice johnson, the congressional black caucus, our power, our message, honoring our 50-year legacy. in a statement in honor of
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billie holiday's life and legacy, eddie bernice johnson. the speaker pro tempore: the request will be covered under general leave. ms. jackson lee: i thank the speaker. i want to take a moment to just put into the record really the historical description of the congressional black caucus. since its establishment in 1971, the congressional black caucus has been committed to using the full constitutional power, statutory authority and financial resources of the federal government to ensure that black americans and other marginalized communities in the united states have the opportunity to achieve the american dream. as part of this commitment, the c.b.c. has fought in the past 50 years to empower citizens and address their legislative concerns by nursing a policy
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agenda that is inclusive, pragmatic, effective and resonates with the american people. just for a moment i would like to comment on the inter-relatedness, dangerous inter-relatedness of race and the insurrectionist day of january 6. we're on the floor because we have a unique history. we are a multiranged people, a multicultural people. we are individuals whose heritage are intertwined with other backgrounds. we are african-americans, we are caribbean americans, we are -- in terms of african-americans, we are caribbean blacks, if will you. we come from all over the world . but we come to america and we
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are described by a singular history. and if we have come with a singular history, i think it is important to intertwine what happened on january 6, shockingly. madam speaker, those who came to object, so they say, to the election -- the duly qualified and legitimate election of president joe biden and of course vice president harris, they of course came allegedly with that proposition. but at the same time i'm stunned by the words of a police officer by the name of mr. harry dunn. courageous and brave with so many others. who indicated that the rioters called me the n word dozens of
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times. so here we are 50 years celebrating the congressional black caucus, here we are defenders of democracy, many of our members, former members of the united states military, having gone into battle, or our family members have. many fell in as early a war as world war i, world war ii, the korean war, the vietnam war. iraq. and afghanistan. and other wars in between. we shed our blood for this country. and the so-called people that came and said they just wanted some democracy, they believe that their candidate won, but they took enough time to call the sons and daughters of enslaved africans who are wearing the uniform, defending democracy, they took time to call them the n word. they took time to carry a fake flag, calling it the
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confederate flag, when it's a symbol in the 1960's of the harshness and brutality of segregation and the klan. they took time to bring that flag to the united states congress. in the midst of the highest number of elected persons of color, persons who are descendents in many different ways of enslaved africans. but here i wanted to mention mr. dunn's name. there are many others that were beaten that day. and i honor them and we will honor them as time goes. in this night tonight, we mention this gentleman who said most powerfully, harry dunn recalled the sickening events of january 6 when he says the level of racist abuse he suffered caused him to break down in tears. but he was not broken. and his quote was, y'all failed. that is my message today.
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all of the brutality that we may have experienced of which i will talk about in a moment, all of it failed. that is why we are here today fighting in the labor committee, fighting in the science committee, fighting in ways and means, energy and commerce, judiciary, interior, armed services, oversight committee, budget committee, where you will see our presence . we are fighting for america, but we are the conscience that drives the reality that there are more people to be concerned about than those of us in this chamber, that there are mothers and fathers who work every day, who don't see the fruit of their labor. there are children who clamor for education, but it is not there. there are soldiers who need to
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have the line of hierarchy and the route or the route to promotion and elevation that don't get it. they are business persons who have brilliant ideas but can't access the capitol. there are incarcerated persons who are not guilty but still incarcerated. there are deloors of -- doors of college institutions closed. there are people who want to do better with a newhouse. but still in the 21st century are red-lined. and there are many who want to go places and cannot go who are african-american. we're not complaining. we're trying to explain how much has been done by people who have had this kind of history. it's important to take note of that. so at this moment i'm happy to yield for a moment back to mr.
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torres, if he will carry forth ment and before he does that, may i have -- forth. and before he does, -- does that, may i have the time remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady has 24 minutes remaining. ms. jackson lee: i thank the gentlewoman. i thank the speaker. thank you very much. mr. torres, i yield to you. mr. torres: thank you as always for the inspirational words. you know, our colleague, congress member jones, spoke earlier about brown vs. board of education. brown vs. board of education was the first legal case i ever read. in high school i participated in a form of legal debate known as -- which taught me how to think and read and write and speak critically and artfully and i will never forget after reading brown vs. board of education how inspired i felt,
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those words and the field of education, separate but equal is inherently unequal. those words inspired me to see myself as a young black man, as a public servant. maybe one day as a member of the united states congress. but i have to be honest with you. if you had said to me a year ago that i would become a member of congress during an infectious disease outbreak, that i would witness an insurrection against the u.s. capitol during the electoral college vote count and that i would then vote to impeach an outgoing president who had been impeached once before, i would have said that sounds a lot like a movie. so this has been the most draining and disorienting beginning for any freshman class in the modern history of the united states congress.
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but i'm nevertheless honored to be here. and january 6 is a reminder that the mission of the c.b.c. takes on a renewed urgency. congress member, you and i sit on homeland security committee. -- on the homeland security committee. one of our highest priorities is going to be counterterrorism and during one of our recent hearings, i made the observation that america has a pattern of willful blindness toward white supremacist extremism as a form of domestic terror. even though the statistics have been clear that white is you premmist extremism has been the dominant -- supremacist extremism has been the dominant driver, the u.s. government did not designate them as a terrorist organization until 2020.
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2020. never mind the massacre against african-americans, against latinos, against members of the lgbtq community, it took the federal government until 2020 to finally recognize white supremacy as a form of domestic terrorism. i'm often asked, who do you admire in history and you brought up the underground railroad. i'm a great admirer of harriette tub men -- harriet tubman. who is the architect of the underground railroad, she's america's moses. she was a genuine liberator of an enslaved people. but i also have deep admiration for ida b. wells who was alone as a journalist in standing up to the campaign of domestic
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terrorism and lynchings against african-americans. and so we have to draw from the legacy of ida b. wells and renew our commitment to fighting domestic terrorism in our own time and i look forward to joining you in that fight and learning from you. and i yield back. ms. jackson lee: my co-air chore has -- my co-anchor has very powerfully captured the many heroes in our community, historical heroes as well. and heroes that pushed against the edge, walked right up to the line, never failed to be courageous, never failed to work on behalf of people who were voiceless and powerless. harriet tubman was that woman. she was general moses and she told slaves that it was not
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going to be their task to stop along the railroad. they were going to get to their destination and i guess she was a little harsh, dead or alive. that is the push of the congressional black caucus. we're not violent people, so i won't say dead or alive, but we are consistently engaged in pushing the envelope, pushing the margins, pushing the conscience of this congress, led certainly over a huge number of years by the late john robert lewis. john conyers, who headed the judiciary committee and fought against every civil rights injustice. so many leaders. as i indicated, shirley chisholm who ran for the presidency. barbara jordan who sat on the impeachment committee as a young member and said, we the
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people, and she denied any right of anyone to undermine the constitution. her voice was strong and powerful, glad to call her my mentor and my predecessor. and so i just want so i just want to give these words, congressman torres. i want to capture some words here on that insurrection. everyone knew the outcome of the 2020 presidential election long before january 6. 2021. we also knew the states were going through a lot of tra versioning, even they were sued, they still came back as each state leader said, no fraud,s the outcome. because of the transparent soif each state's election administration, that of the joint meeting of congress was simply confirm that joe biden had won more than a majority of
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the electoral vote along with winning the popular vote by bimore than seven million votes. we know this was a historic election, more votes than we had ever voted, i believe, in the history of the united states. there was a sense of exhilaration. democracy was alye. so many rung people vote sosmed many people of the potpourri of america, all backgrounds. with efelt so good about voting together. many of us voting the same way, for the same candidate, as edd by his victory. states that we had lost four years ago, enthusiastically voting for change. for goodness. for a spirit of unity. we knew something was on the horizon. but isn't it interesting that after that election, for months, people had been told the complete lie. which allowed them to stay in places that we did not know and
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conspired to come and attack this place, this holy place, place of democracy this place that has, madam speaker, above you, in god we trust. they attacked this place. and the riot came immediately after then-president trump promoted a march on the capitol an called his supporters to stop the steal. never give up. never concede. and to fight like hell during a speech that day asserting that they would not have a country anymore if they did not act. i weave these in to our message of our power, our message, 50 years of the congressional black caucus, because i think history will tell, reading the annals of the congressional record you will see that the members of the cop gregsal black caucus, when they were tiny, until we have expanded, have consistently gone gone to the floor on questions of justice and expanding
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opportunity, and ensuring that justice is not a respecter of color or age or region. we fight for justice no matter what the color of your skin. what your background is. we are purists as it relates to justice. we love the constitution. because even though we were three fifths of a person, we were not a human being when it was finalized. it was a document that grew and continues to breathe right from the first amendment to the 13th amendment, 14th amendment, 15th amendment. to the right for women to vote. to the amendments that deal with a right to trial by jury. to the fifth amendment, due process and the protection of your property. these are all breathing documents an words, breathing amendments. that have allowed a people who
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were in bondage to scrap their way out of the devastation of hatred. we use this constitution. but shamefully, that fight has to continue. and on january 6, that fight, that scab was torn off again. that rub was burning again. those who came to say, congresswoman, congressman torres, that they were fighting for trump and fighting to overturn the election but more importantly they were fighting because the election was theirs, called a black officer the n-word more times than ke he can remember. caused him to break down among others. and he had the courage to say, all that they tried to do failed. let me just show these
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depictions of our journey. i'll start with this one. this year, 2021, is the 100th anniversary, i hate to even use that term, of the tulsa riots. allegedly, a young black man in an elevator was alleged to have touched a white woman. i think when he finally got out of the elevator it was alleged rape or it was rape, a typical story other and over again. -- over and over again. that is why we have such pain for george floyd, breonna taylor, tamir rice, trayvon martin, ahmaud arbery, pamela turner, sandra bland, and jacob blake, eli j in colorado, an names beyond. sean bell.
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eric garner. mothers who have -- michael brown. that's why we have such pain. and i guess my constituent, the family li that's become america's family, along with all the other mothers and fathers, george floyd, grew up in houston, texas. in the cuny homes, mother was the queen of public housing, took in children, fed children. big george is what he was called. big man. took his brothers an sisters under his wing. george floyd played basketball. my recollection is in china. with yao ming, when they were young players, not pros. this is the 100th anniversary of
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some of those like the names that i called. lifes cut down. this depiction is captured negros on way to convention hall during the tulsa race riot. they were captured. there was no justice. 300 negroes, black americans, were buried in an up marked grave as we were told. this is how it was. this is how it was. this is how it was. the congressional black caucus will be commemorating that. this year. and i will introduce legislation with senator warner, senator warren, on the tulsa race riots next week. 4,000 plus blacks were hung.
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and as you can see, there were smiling faces in the crowd. it was entertainment. come to the town square. no, this is not a depiction of some dastardly person who did violent acts an raided through the community. this could have been someone walking along a dark road. it could have been the three boys in mississippi during the civil rights movement. they were just driving. trying to get to their destination. these folk could have been walking. we had won one -- one woman who had a dispute with a storekeeper. she was a business woman. she was ultimately hung. never came back home the family was looking for where she might be. looks like another celebratory occasion. hangings. we'll hear more of this when we proceed to discuss our
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commission to study an develop reparation proposals. but let me, before i yield to my good friend and co-anchor, i just want you to see this one. this gentleman's name was, i'm going to call him mr. gordon. he is a slave, was a slave, deceased. and clearly those are markings of a very bad beating. but that's not the end of his story. this gentleman came out of slavery and fought in the civil war on behalf of the union. this is what we did. we always rise to the occasion. you'll hear more about our story but ined to make sure that we just got a sense of how we have been overcomers. but even with being evercomers, we know there are more to do.
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i'm very delighted to be able to yield at this time to the gentlelady from georgia and she is in her own right a leader, a new member of this body, has civil rights in her blood, a mother, and she is here ready to fight for our children's education. and she will succeed. congresswoman williams. ms. williams: thank you so much. thank you, madam speaker. today my congressional black caucus colleagues and i observe black history month and celebrate 50 years of our power, our message. 50 years, the congressional black caucus has uplifted the voices of black people and other marginalized communities so they can share in the promise of
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america for all. for the 117th congress, the congressional black caucus marked a new milestone with 5 members, the largest membership in c.b.c. history. the next 50 years of our power, our message is strong. we are here in d.c. witnessing more black history being made with the first black woman, hbcu granddad, and member of our congressional black caucus serving as vice president of the united states. indeed, our power and our message is strong. while we continue to make great strides, it's not lost on me that 2020 was a difficult year for black people across this country. collectively, we battled the pandemic that continues to infect and kill black people at disproportionate rates. and my home state of georgia, plaque people are also experiencing some of the highest level of unemployment in decades by november, 2020, black
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georgians have filed 71% more unemployment claims than white, hispanic, latinx and asian american workers combined. being black in georgia, we fight daily for what so many take for granted in this country. the right to vote. the right to the fair and equal treatment that george floyd didn't get. the right to be. the right to exist. today in particular, we reflect on how far we have to go. one year ago, ahmaud arbery was hunted down and murdered simply because he was a black man going for a jog in burnswood, georgia. his murder by white supremacists and the subsequent delay in realizing justice may seem new but black people have dealt with systemic racism for centuries in america. and we are here to break these structures and dismantle these systems using our power and our
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message as the congressional black caucus. thank you and i yield back. ms. jackson lee: thank the gentlelady for her word. and certainly her powerful words on the importance of our vice president, the honorable vice president harris. we are grateful for her. my pleasure to yield to the gentleman from bronx, my co-anchor, mr. torres. mr. torres: i want to pay tribute to my classmate, congress member williams, who as the chair of the georgia democratic party was instrumental in winning the senate for the democratic party. thanks to the leadership of on the ground organizers like congress member williams, a democrat exsenate, a democratic house, a democratic president
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means we have the makings of an f.d.r. moment. we have a historic opportunity to govern as boldly in the 21st century as f.d.r. did in the 20th century. systemic racism in america traces back 400 years. and it's incredible to think that in the 400-year history of our country, we ares a close as we have ever been to confronting the root causes of systemic racism. so that's the burden that we bear as the congressional black caucus. but it's not only a burden, it's a blessing. public service in an f.d.r. moment is a blessing. it's said the first historian, herodotus, said that he wrote
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the first historical book so that the deeds of great people cannot be forgotten. that's the same reason the c.b.c. exists. so that the deeds of black heroes like harriet tubman and ida b. wells, like john lewis, like barack obama, and kamala harris are never forgotten. so the contributions of black america should remain front and center in the life of our country. so it's been an honor to be with you, congress member jackson,ky not tell you how honored i feel to be a member of the c.b.c. i grew up all my life, i was raised by a single mother who
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had to raise three children on minimum wage, which was at -- which was $4.25. i grew up in public housing in conditions of mold, mildew, leaks and lead without consistent heat and hot water in the winter. i never could have imagined myself as a member of the greatest institution in the united states congress, the congressional black caucus. it is an honor to be here with you in this caucus at this moment. i yield back. ms. jackson lee: we're humbled by your word. we're humbled by this moment in history and i will conclude my remarks by building on congressman torres, that we are both humbled but we are honored, but we are ready to work. i leave with you these words from our colleagues and others, john lewis said, we are in a very difficult time in our country. i'm afraid we may wake up one
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day in america, our democracy is gone. but he went on to say that when you see something that is not right, say something. do something. get into good trouble. one of our ancient fathers said, frederick douglass, that there is no power without struggle. tonight we have laid the landscape of genius, contributions, sacrifice and brilliance and the commitment to civil rights that is the congressional black caucus. our message, our power, our power, our message. and we will continue to work, we will not yield. not give in. not give out. and not give up. thank you, madam speaker. let me indicate -- i thank my colleagues for joining the c.b.c. special order tonight. and i thank the speaker and i yield my time. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 5-a-1-b of
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house resolution 8, the house stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. tomorrow for morning hour debated several bills. tomorrow, they were on a measure that aims to ban this from against lgbtq americans. later this week, debate on the democrats relief package. that legislation includes several unemployment benefits set to expire, and then increase over five years in the federal minimum wage, from seven dollars and $.25 to $15 an hour. follow 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> c-span's washington journal.
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everyday we are taking your calls live, on the air. we discussed policy issues that impact you. coming up wednesday morning, the chair of the budget committee discusses the american rescue plan totaling $1.9 trillion in coronavirus relief. then tkibuli leonard on this week's confirmation hearings. watch c-span's washington journal, live at 7:00 eastern wednesday morning. be sure to join in with your phone calls, facebook comments, text messages and suites. >> william burns testifies wednesday morning at a confirmation hearing. watch live, beginning at 10:00 eastern on c-span three, online at c-span.org, or listen on the free c-span radio app.
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>> you are watching c-span, your unfiltered view of government. c-span was created by america's cable television companies in 1979. today, we are brought to buy these television companies that provide c-span to as a public service. >> the senate health committee considered the nomination for the health and human services repertory. he was asked about covid-19 distribution, guidelines for reopening schools, rural health care access, and prescription drug costs. he previously served 12 terms in the house of representatives until 2017 when he became the california attorney general. his confirmation hearing is 2.5 hours.

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