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tv   FOX and Friends Sunday  FOX News  June 26, 2022 3:00am-7:00am PDT

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follow me on twitter and facebook as well as rumble and everything else. guess who is next? harris: dan bongino. brian: you know everything. harris: you just said it. ♪ ♪ o say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming ♪. ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous
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fight, o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantedly streaming, and the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, gave proof through the night that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ o say does that star-spangled banner yet wave? ♪ ♪ oer the land of the free and the home of the brave ♪
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will: straight to fox news alert. two major stories covering today including president's biden trip to the g-7 summit. he met with the german chancellor just hours ago, getting straight to the ongoing russian war on ukraine as russia launches airstrikes on kyiv. president biden: there is a lot to do. i want to compliment you stepping up as you did when you became chancellor. had a freight impact on the rest of europe particularly as it relates to ukraine. pete: the other the major story here at home in the u.s. in response to the supreme court's fabulous reversal roe v. wade. pregnancy centers under attack. rachel: president's meetings continue but first we go to
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alexandria hoff who is live at the supreme court with the latest on the protests. good morning. reporter: good morning. yeah this will be day three of protests here outside of the supreme court yesterday. we saw several hundred turned out. things remained peaceful but police presence was on hand here to make up the many shouting matches that did take place out here t was a different kind of scene though. if you look at colorado where authorities responded early yesterday morning to a fire at the life choices pregnancy center in long month. the building was covered in graffiti. a familiar threat if abortions are not safe neither are you. reports in vandalism in new york after thousands of protesters took to the streets starting friday. in oregon, 10 people arrested for disorderly conduct. in arizona protesters attempted to breach the doors of the state senate. police deployed tear gas and
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evacuation done of that building. more official route, more than 30 democratic senators wrote a letter to president biden, using full force of the federal government to protect access to abortion in the united states. here is what the president said he can do when it comes to state abortion policies yesterday. president biden: my administration will focus how they administer, whether they violate other laws, not allowing people across state lines for public health services. we'll take actions to protect women's rights and reproductive health. reporter: white house maintained the president is not in favor of expanding the court. out here today, we are expecting larger crowds to come until maybe 11:00 p.m., but at this point if they will be as large as they were friday and yesterday. rachel, will, pete. will: thank you, alexandria. good morning to both of you. glad to be with you this morning. rachel we missed you yesterday. look forward to your perspective
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this morning. as we move into day 3, hour 36 or so, 48 after the supreme court decision, you see this passion, it reminds me, set aside where we are on each of us as individuals on the morality of abortion and even on the lee galty, when the supreme court jerked the question of life out of public's hands some 50 years ago. this is part of what will happen. this passion sits there under the surface on both sides of the equation. that is why the democratic process to best way to solve passionately health issues. as we to forward there will be a lot of passion and it will be catharticly exercised. nine people took it out of the hands 50 years ago. now it is back in the hands of the people. rachel: allow people to decide what they want. people are so divided, point to
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trump and biden. america has been divided since this decision. a lot of politics that don't seem to have anything to do with abortion at its heart really do have to do with abortion. it has divided america for the same grave moral reasons that slavery did. who gets to decide who is human enough to enjoy life, liberty, pursuit of happenp happiness. this is essentially the core of who we are as a people. pro-life movement made many mistakes in messaging, but all kinds of stuff, one thing they did do recognize early on this decision at roe v. wade was unconstitutional. they focused very much on getting justices in, single-mindedly, it was methodical and they were patient and they took a chance on somebody named donald trump who seemed like a very unlikely person but seemed like somebody tough enough to do the right thing and to put in justices who
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would make this happen and it happened. pete: to do what he said he would do. in mornings we show images what happened overnight, there are protests, there are confrontations, there are angry people, people with spray paint can and going to pregnancy centers, spraying anarchy symbols. that's fine. there are millions, and millions of americans prayerfully home at church and their families praising god for the decision that undoes the sin what happened 50 years ago, it creates another opportunity for life in this country. this is a moment for celebration for so many people. a lot of those folks were in illinois yesterday where rachel, as you mentioned donald trump held a rally. if you look at the state of the court, there is just no doubt without the three justices he nominated this moment would not have occurred. here is what donald trump said. >> the court handed down a victory for the constitution, a
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victory for the rule of law, above all a victory for life. [cheering] this breakthrough is the answer to the prayers of millions and millions of people and these prayers have gone on for decades, for decades and decades they have been praying and now those prayers have been answered through the generations of americans in the pro-life movement as well as countless constitutional conservatives. your boundless, love, sacrifice and devotion has finally been rewarded in full. congratulations. >> yes. when we drive around to gas up our car we see these signs that say, you did this at the price of gasoline. that could be said right now about donald trump. you did this. he did something that a lot of people, when he was running thought was, you could never do. he literally said, i promise you i will appoint justices who are
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constitutionalists and who are pro-life. you weren't allowed to say that. it was so controversial when he said that. now it's, it's happened. as he said, so many prayers answered on so many pro-lifers, so patiently waited for this. pete: still 24 hour protection for the justices who are under threat, under threat had the courage to stick more or less to the original decision to come out to overturn roe v. wade. rachel: certainly. to another fox news alert. president biden is on the world stage today. he meets with g-7 leaders in germany. will: biden will take part in several events throughout the day with focus on the economy and war on ukraine as russia strikes the heart of ukraine's capital. the city of kyiv again. pete: alex hogan live in austria. reporter: this is the first day of the 48th g-7 as the top
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democratic economic powers come together to meet annually talk about the economy, sustainability and climate. all of the leaders will meet individually and as a group. there will also be a dinner tonight. president joe biden touched down last night greeted by a traditional bavarian relcome. he will meet with leaders of italy, uk, japan, and germany. this summit takes place at a private castle outside of munich. he met with the german chancellor shoals, calling the america one of. scholl praised the message and called on need for unity. mt. president working on economic challenges. we have to stay together.
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putin thousand somehow nato and the g-7 would splinter. we haven't and we're not going to. reporter: the response to russia's invasion of ukraine is set to be the major focus of the g-7 this year. just this morning russia launched air raid strikes once again on the capital of ukraine, kyiv. this morning the u.s. announcing that the new step the g-7 will take to pressure the kremlin. that is banning imports of gold from russia. this weekend with problem and its economic practice cities will also likely top the agenda as well as global concerns of supply chain crunches, global food security and gas hikes around the world. protesters have as gathered in response to the g-7 meeting. specifically they're calling for greater climate action change. this will not be the last time many of these faces will sit together at a summit. just couple days time they will travel to spain for the meeting
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of nato. rachel, will, pete. pete: alex, thank you very much. here with more reaction let's bring in hudson institute senior policy fellow, policy expert, rebecca heinrichs. thank you for being here. what do we make of this meeting, anything of significance? sounds dreadfully boring to me but anything of significance will come to this? >> this sounds so boring as the president sounds so sleepily talking to germany. he commended the germany supporting ukraine. the germans had this wonderful bold response they will start investing more in security, investing in defense, getting weapons into ukraine to help ukraine. all that fizzled out. that is mostly all air, all rhetoric, not a lot of substance. what i would like to see pushing germany and france to actually do more to say what they, to do
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more to actually make good what they said which helped ukraine win and push the russians out. vladmir putin has been very optimistic about what's going on in russia lately. i think part of that is begun to sense that western support for ukraine is beginning to wane. will: rebecca, i want to pick up on something heard in the report, united states sanction russian gold. that is something pete brought up yesterday on "fox & friends." he said oddly the russian economy is doing very well. the russian economy seems to rebounded amidst all these sanctions. what's going on? why is russia, kind of when we left off the news cycle, since, sort of made its way to the back of the news cycle, people have not noticed, their economy seems not to be suffering? >> i mean russia's economy is complex and if you only sanction some commodities, not other commodities you're not going to see the kind of really painful effect that you want to get russia to change their behavior. my colleagues at hudson
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institute have been saying since the beginning you have to sanction gold. this is really late in the game. it shows how much more the united states if they were really truly leading this effort to crush russia what they could have done early on but they have not. they have been holding back. the other thing really important to keep in mind, because the press has begun to look away from what is going on, russia weaponized global food supply as well as energy there is this naval blockade, they're not letting ukrainian food out into the global market, that is what we'll see salmon, high food prices, even in western countries, other secondary effects. it is still a major problem. the united states still needs to lead nato despite, the pols, brits, help ukraine push russians out. not peace any at cost but a peace to have ukraine have a sovereign nation when this is over. rachel: i'm glad you brought up the food supply situation globally, the impact of that on the third world.
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bringing back famines. there is terrible things we're going to see in the near future this g-7 summit seems to double down on climate change, a lot of things that are not great concern. in fact may have precipitated some of the problems that we're seeing right now with russia. rebecca, thank you for joining us this morning. >> thank you. pete: you're exactly right. i didn't mean to be hyperbolic on the boring thing. so many things they could be doing but they are getting together to talk about the climate change. will: and united states supreme court. pete: yes. rachel: they're weighing in on roe v. wade and instead of -- just imagine if they put this much effort into perhaps preventing this war which could have prevented you know, the famine that so many people are -- pete: hope on germany to be a part of, turns out been smoke and mirrors. will: we'll have more on the
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international response to the overturning of roe v. wade as pete and i go off the wall a little later in the show. lawless in los angeles. a armed group of masked thieves smash their way into high-end jewelry store around bolt. george gascon insists pandemic and not his policies are to blame for the rise in crime. a reality check next. pete: we may finally have a breakthrough to relief travel chaos we've seen all summer. an update for you on that coming up. ♪ dentistry. one who believes in doing anything it takes to make dentistry work for your life. so we offer a complete exam and x-rays free to new patients without insurance - everyday. plus, patients get 20% off their treatment plan. we're on your corner and in your corner every step of the way.
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cancer research requires bold and innovative thinking. you may be able to help science uncover the next breakthrough by sharing your patient data and unique experience with researchers. join stand up to cancer and count me in at standuptocancer.org/countmein. ♪. rachel: the crime crisis in america continues to rage across the nation including the tragic shooting death of a baby in chicago this weekend. pete: in new york a grandmother and 8-year-old child were among the latest victims inn another senseless act of violence. will: ashley strohmier is live with more. good morning. reporter: unfortunately sad news to start on a sunday morning but a baby girl was shot and killed wild sitting in the back of a car in a chicago neighborhood.
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friday night, five-month-old ses sell jaw thomas was shot in the head when someone fired from another car. she was taken to the hospital. she eventually died of her injuries. no arrest was made in the case. in brooklyn a grandmother was killed, an 8-year-old child was hurt after a driver was pleaing police the grandmother was crossing the street when hit and killed. the 8-year-old is in critical condition. a bicyclist and two other people were hurt. new york city mayor eric adams blaming the state bail reform for the tragedy and asking prosecutors to do their jobs an prosecute. >> we have a elderly grandmother that was struck and killed. we will catch the people responsible. without even knowing who they are i guarranty you they have a long criminal record. i guarranty you they have a history. that is the only thing we're sure of. reporter: this while hundreds of prosecutors quit over the d.a.'s soft on crime policies.
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in los angeles video caught the moment a gang of thieves wielding ski masks and a hammer smashed their way through a jewelry store in manhattan beach store, before making off in that getaway car a lot of crime across the country crows to coast this weekend, guys. back to you. pete: thank you, ashley. will: honestly for just one moment from a visceral reaction, this is just not only intolerable, unacceptable isn't strong enough word there are people dying on the streets every weekend. we report on it almost a day-to-day basis. the slaughter on the streets of chicago is, why there aren't -- you want to protest? you want to go out actually affect change? you want to save lives. babies being shot in the back of cars, that is new york city. brought this up in the commercial break, colleague of ours, giano caldwell.
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pete: giano caldwell friend of ours, amazing guy, had his 18-year-old brother name christian, shot and killed over the weaken. getaway car drove away. another two people shot on the scene. they have no idea who it was. we're hoping for justice. we're praying for gianno and his family. completely senseless. will be a name and number to somebody else. that is a human life, that is family. he takes care of him and them. a life gone. to what end? what consequence? where is the justice? where is the outrage? you never see it. you never hear it. rachel: this is almost so surreal with gianno. he has been talking about the crime in chicago on this network incessantly. a great guy. our hearts are so broken for him. look at his beautiful brother. it is just, it is so tragic. over in l.a., george gascon the county d.a., same thing, he says
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the crime in this city is not about him and his policies. he says it is about the pandemic. this is lynnette romero, ktla anchor in l.a. do you feel like l.a. county is safer because of what you have done? he said yeah, in some areas it is. i think it is important to start out saying i was a police officer for many years before i was the district attorney. i know how to keep communities safe. a lot of loss angle would disagree with them. coming out a of pandemic, had tremendous impact not only in l.a. county but around the nation. crime is up around the nation. some of our neighboring counties per capita are having higher than we were. we have impact on crime and homelessness around the city. a lot of things we have not seen them. i'm frustrated as much as the next person. that is national problem, not just a l.a. problem. l.a. in many ways is actually
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beginning to come out of it. as i said a lot -- pete: tell that to people in l.a. rachel: a lot of people in l.a. would disagree. go back to something reported on earlier in the segment, they talk about all the d.a.s quitting in bragg's office, assistant d.a.'s quitting in bragg's office. i'm encouraged. there are d.a.s out there, prosecutors who say this is not what we're supposed to do. my fear in five, 10 years, from now, that won't happen. that these law schools are turning out people who think like alvin bragg. who think like gascon. they are activists. they're not interested in prosecuting criminals. they're interested in appeasing them. they have some sort of social justice or or restorative justice in this country. will: can i beat your pessimism with some optimism?
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rachel: sure. will: i give you san francisco, recall of chesa boudin, you turn out idealogues, ruin quality of life, i'm sorry, destroy your quality of life. people even on the far lefter say enough uncle. people of chicago got to do that you have got to scream enough. this is enough. there are enough of you dying. your cities are being destroyed. enough. enough, not everything is like, you know, politics, but this is politics mean you have got to get the leaders, right prosecutors, right mayors. enough, sold about pandemic and guns. blaming, you got to get evildoers off the street. you have to. >> pete, you understand the infection of these schools. pete: i'm in middle of both of you. i think you're exactly right and we're going to have increasing voters who see the world that way because they have come out of these institutions. will: until they experience it.
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pete: they do, but they're self-loathing, taught to feel guilty about their lot in life. those that can will retreat behind feated communities, problem for rest of the people. pour more money at it. money will solve it. talk about prospects for future. address climate change. reason why you don't do real thing which is restore families, bring about justice. allow people to defend themselves. so, i don't know. i'm in the middle. it could go either way. >> there is hope for what happened in the san francisco no doubt about it. will: both things we're say something true. i know what you're saying about law schools, after david dinkins came rudy giuliani. i know after the '70s, and '80s, in new york city, came late '90s, and early 2,000s. they changed the city. rudy giuliani changed the city drastically. it will take something like that again in chicago, in san francisco. pete: didn't have a d.a. to deal with like alvin bragg.
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will: i never made the claim it will be easy. rachel: just saying as someone who used to live in san francisco, san francisco had to descend into mad max before this happened. will: yeah. rachel: and i just think -- will: i was there. >> i know. and i think there is a level of tolerance that enough liberals have, enough excuse-making have for the lore roars that their ideology brings about, i don't know. i just, this city is unliveable. i'm sorry. it is just unliveable. they keep electing these kind of people. i don't think a giuliani could get elected in new york city more. pete: that might be a scary reality. we're 28 minutes after the top of the hour. we turn now to a few additional headlines starting with fox news alert. norway is on the highest terror alert after a shooting at a nightclub in oslo yesterday left two dead, at least 10 injured. police deenat thatting the
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42-year-old suspect after the attack. saying he is to them. they did not expand on the details of the terror alert. i wonder why? police say he is being held on charges -- multiple charges including terrorism. look into his background. what does belief? you won't be surprised. travel trouble could be coming to an end for frustrated passengers as largest pilot's union comes to agreement to boost their pay 14% in 14 months. 4,000 united airline pilots are waiting agreement. other airlines are expected to follow suit to alleviate staffing shortages, flight cancellations and delays. this weekend we saw 1000 cancellations. 5600 delays. will: that is better than yesterday. pete: that is an improvement, great point. now, rachel? philadelphia stars shining yesterday as they stunned the new jersey generals in a major upset. the stars advancing to the
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championship game with a 19-14 win. generals have been steam rolling all year. the birmingham stallions continuing their winning ways. they beat the new orleans breakers 31-17. to face the stars in the league final. both teams squaring off next sunday for the inaugural championship. catch that on fox. today, abby is joining us with both winning coaches before they square off next sunday. those are your headlines. will: fox news alert, another pregnancy center, this time in colorado is attacked overnight after the supreme court overturned roe. our next guest understands what that is like having their own centers van vandalized. their message after the break.
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began weeks prior to the supreme court ruling overturning roe v. wade. this morning we're speaking with two women who run pro-life centers targeted before friday's decision. penny nance, ceo of concerned women for america. her d.c. office was vandalized. patrice booker is head of hope pregnancy center. her group's philadelphia clinic was targeted. penny what happened at your facility prior to the decision? >> first we have the nation's largest conservative women's organization. we're a public policy organization, will. it is an honor to be on with you. our members worked for over 50 years all over the country to advocate for this moment. it is a beautiful day. we're deeply appreciative president trump we got to experience june 24. even prior to that. as soon as the decision leaked out we came under attack with an
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individual who damaged our building, who urinated on our door, exposed himself on the cameras. he has been harassing our staff for a while. we filed a hate crime report with the fbi. we had no follow-up. merrick garland is very interested in making political points on television but not interested in protecting the over30 now pregnancy care centers and organizations like mine that have been targeted. this is domestic terrorism. merrick garland needs to be hauled before congress and asked to explain the situation and why they have not acted. will: what about, what about your centers? i'm sure you share the moment of this as well that penny gave. explain what happened at your centers? >> yes. i'm the director of the whole pregnancy center here in philadelphia, pa, we just like
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penny experienced vandalism from someone decided they wanted to take it upon themselves to do their own justice. so we had someone come and smash out all of our windows, all of our doors, with the exception of one wouldn't do that they pegged with graffiti unidentified. our organization has been there sin 2009 helping and serving the community, saving lives. the founder, ceo, started the center with the direction of the desiring to be there as a voice for families, voice of the communities. being able to help one woman not only beyond the initial visit but relief, walk alongside them, throughout the pregnancy, throughout their lives, things of that nature. will: understanding that is what type of services you provide to women, how do you explain, not just the emotional response but
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the violence? it is property damage at the very minimum. the violent response to your services? >> yes. for those that you know, they have that type of response, it is very alarming. it was very frightening to see for us, that is the first that we've had that type of response from anyone. but our services are just beyond just helping pregnant women. we have the ability, we have been able to effectively really, honestly help women go beyond training train them for work. we have many of our children have been able to be in our early childhood center, our charter school. even being able to go on to college. so we not only just be with them for the initial visit but that is what makes us unique. we're able to really be there throughout the pregnancy, throughout life, holistic aspect. will: penny, last word, where do you think this goes? have you had to make adjustments
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to the facility? increase security? where do you think this goes? >> like most organizations we have armed security. but bottom line we're never going to stop. hear what she said. she is pregnancy care centers walk alongside women and their children. we care about the least of these. we're called to this, concerned women for america we've been at this 43 years. we will always, always work to protect life. our members are in every state this is a state by state battle. it is about the alternatives. we want to protect the pregnancy care centers. this is a federal domestic terrorism issue. merrick garland should act. he needs to be act why he is not. thank you so much. will: penny, latrice thanks for standing with us and life. thank you both. >> thank you. will: still ahead a win for school choice. the thousands of dollars now
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tied to students instead of schools. this is on a scale we have not yet seen before. it is in arizona coming up. it'! we've got cheeseburger sliders on king's hawaiian pretzel slider buns. sliiiiiiiiii-der sunday! [crash] everything's better between king's hawaiian bread. especially now with king's hawaiian pretzel buns! (music) everything's better between king's hawaiian bread. who said you have to starve yourself to lose weight? who said you can't do dinner? who said only this is good? and this is bad? i'm doing it my way. meet plenity. an fda -cleared clinically proven weight management aid for adults with a bmi of 25-40 when combined with diet and exercise. plenity is not a drug - it's made from naturally derived building blocks
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your record label is taking off. but so is your sound engineer. you need to hire. i need indeed. indeed you do. indeed instant match instantly delivers quality candidates matching your job description. visit indeed.com/hire ♪. rachel: welcome back to "fox & friends." the arizona state legislature passing the most expansive school choice bill in the nation on friday. now extending choice to every student in the state. the bill provides $7,000 per child for educational expenses
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including private school, online education and tutoring. governor doug ducey who is expected to sign the bill in law, tweeting, quote, our kids will no longer be locked in underperforming schools. today their future success is unlocked with this legislation. arizona will now be the first state in the nation to offer all families the option to choose the school setting that works best for them. our next guest says this is the biggest school choice victory in u.s. history. joining us senior fellow at the american federation for children cory deangeles. this is a great day. this is something, you and i known each other for a while. you've been fighting for the money to be attached to the child instead of the institution. so, talk to me about the historic moment. >> yes. this is clearly the biggest victory when it comes to school choice in u.s. history. arizona is now the gold standard for school choice.
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they have now cemented themselves as number one state for educational freedom and supporting parental rights in education. as you said, every single family, regardless of income will be able to take their kid's state funded education dollars to the education provider of their choosing, whether a public school, private school, home based educational option. this is the way that every state should do it. they should follow governor doug ducey's lead, republicans in state legislature and house of arizona. look, republicans across the country have been saying there is a parents party but republicans in arizona just proved it. rachel: yeah, absolutely. it is so interesting we're having a discussion about abortion rights going back to the states. this idea of states doing what is right for them. this would be an experiment, a model for other states to see what happens in arizona. my question, when i see this, it is only $7,000. i have to imagine there is more money being spent for a child in
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that system s that the full amount of the money or is this -- that sounds like voucher kind of money? >> yeah, government-run schools spend over $10,000 per student per year in arizona. this is the state portion of the total fund. >> got it. >> the schools are funded state, locally, federally. public schools will keep money, but end up with higher revenues. when teachers union say it will defund the public schools. they benefit on a per newspaper till basis this is win/win. rachel: what has been the reaction in arizona, from the education circles that you run in? >> oh, we're all super excited all across the country. this is the gold standard of school choice policy. it is the purest form of funding students as opposed to systems. and other states should look towards arizona as the north star when it comes to school choice. and republicans all across the country thud see this as blueprint for success.
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politicians all across the country are starting to see that coming out against parental rights in education can be a form of political suicide. if you support parental rights and education in school choice policy could be a political winner. for example, 79% of the american federation of children action fund and its affiliate candidates have won in their primaries or advanced to runoffs so far this year. we saw what happened with the national school boards association combing out of against parents. they have essentially imploded. half the states have left after they labeled parents as domestic terrorists. >> the way the teachers unions reacted during the pandemic brought to this moment. so much elitism has been exposed. so many people fought against school choice send their even children to private schools. that was exposed during the pandemic as well. and so, congratulations to arizona and congratulations to you, cory. you've been working hard to
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bring this about. maybe this is the beginning of a nationwide movement. arizona is my home state. very proud of them as well. cory deangelis. thank you. >> thank you. >> let's turn now to chief meteorologist rick reichmuth for the fox weather forecast. rick: good morning rachel. big changes weatherwise. look at the map, show you what is going on. look at that, 53 degrees in fargo, this morning. you will need a jacket this morning. that feels good after the heat you're dealing with. 69 in kansas city. this is part of a front moving through, bring quite a bit of rain across areas of the mid-atlantic, eventually by tonight. we'll be watching for a lot of rain in across parts of florida. look across the four corners. we have them on soon going on early this year which is great news. rachel, send it back to you inside. rachel: thank you, rick. good morning, rick.
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still ahead a win for the pro-life movement as the supreme court overturns roe. jonathan morris joins us live this morning with a message of faith and celebration. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ introducing the all-new infiniti qx60. take on your wild world in style. ♪
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♪ call one eight hundred, eight million ♪ pete: this morning the faithful celebrating a victory for pro-life americans. fox news contributor, theologian jonathan morris joins us with the happy sunday. we want to talk about people that we know and trust talked about these issues for so many years, at a big moment roe v. wade overturned, your thoughts? >> no one believed it could really happen except for the millions and millions of americans who have been praying for this to happen all these years. they believed, they persevered and because of that, today in churches around the country people are praying differently. they're thanking god. doesn't mean all of sudden, there is no more abortion in the
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united states. game over. no, now conversations will start on a local level. people will have a real conversation about what abortion is, what it isn't, how to help mothers who are in tough situations, who have to make very hard decisions. it did feel almost inconceivable 10 years ago. absolutely. i grew up, family members would be outside of abortion clinics every week praying picketing, trying to help mothers make a different decision. it was what we grew up with, right? over 50 years of americans saying this was something that needed to end. roe v. wade through another conversation could begin. a lot of prayers of graduatetude in churches. vatican released a statement, bishop's conference, so many pastors of protestant churches,. pete: got an email from my pastor celebrating that moment. it will be the same in church.
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goes to the states. whole another conversation to be had at the local level. >> it's a different conversation than what happened in 1972. why? predominantly because we now with new medical advances, right, people are watching a baby grow in the womb through sonograms, ultrasounds. it is different today. the conversation will not just political or not just about liberty or privacy, about what rights does the baby in the womb have? we're able to see that baby in a way that was not able to be seen. pete: you've seen it with your own baby? >> i have an 8-month-old son. i remember the first moment we saw that little tiny baby growing in his mother's womb, heard the heart beat, that changes everything. pete: no doubt. thank you for the part you played in this, everybody prayers and actions to get to this moment. pretty cool. >> thank you. pete: jonathan morris, great to
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see you always. some states across the u.s. already putting abortion bans in place after the supreme court's ruling. south dakota is one of them. governor kristi noem joins us at the top of the hour. >> tech: when you have auto glass damage, trust safelite. this dad and daughter were driving when they got a crack in their windshield. [smash] >> dad: it's okay. pull over. >> tech: he wouldn't take his car just anywhere... ♪ pop rock music ♪ >> tech: ...so he brought it to safelite. we replaced the windshield and recalibrated their car's advanced safety system, so features like automatic emergency braking will work properly. >> tech: alright, all finished. >> dad: wow, that's great. thanks. >> tech: stay safe with safelite. schedule now. >> singers: ♪ safelite repair, safelite replace. ♪
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♪. will: we begin this hour with a fox news alert. protests continue across the country yesterday following the supreme court's fantastic reversal of roe v. wade. pete: celebrations across the country as well. democrats fuming, now looking to joe biden to try to take drastic action on abortion law. rachel: alexandria hoff is live at the supreme court. reporter: well, good morning. i think i heard you all mentioning earlier it is likely many who are celebrating this decision by the supreme court, that many of these people will be in church this morning. we do expect though the protests, for protests to continue here outside of the supreme court as they did
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yesterday. obviously haven't picked up just yet. we expect they will, probably around 11:00. yesterday the protests were peaceful and loud. police were on standby to break up many shouting matches that took place. different kind of scene in colorado where authorities responded early yesterday to a fire at life choices pregnancy center in longmont. greedy was written on the building if abortions are not safe, neither are you. in oregon 10 people were arrested for disorderly conduct. the crowd zeroed in on a crisis pregnancy center there. arrests made for vandalism in new york. thousands of protesters took to the streets starting friday. in arizona, protesters attempted to breach the doors of the state senate. police had to deploy tear goose there, also evacuate that building. president biden: bide said violence and intimidation are never acceptable.
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his administration maintains they will seek woman's ability to travel, insure practicing nancy and abortion related medications. >> two hours after we learned about the decision the president gave a, gave remarks, powerful, passionate remarks to the american public and laid out two concrete steps on how to move forward. the president is going to continue to find solutions. reporter: yesterday more than 30 democratic senators wrote a letter to president biden urging him to quote, use the full force of the federal government to protect access to abortion in the united states. the president has said while he is frustrated by this decision there is nothing in terms of executive action that he can do to undo the supreme court's decision. although yesterday some protesters out here were suggesting the undoing of the supreme court entirely. will, rachel, pete. will: thank you, alexandria, for that report. pete: response undo the supreme
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court. get rid of it. dissolve it. will: bring in term limits. pete: i'm surprised they haven't called to defund it. will: south dakota governor, kristi noem latest reaction to this. she has a book, not my first rodeo, lessons from the heartland. on sale this tuesday. great to have you on the program this morning. >> great to be with you. it has been a wonderful week. why it sure has. it sure has. governor, you've been on the forefront for this issue, personally for me as well when you passed the legislation to ban abortion based on the diagnosis of down syndrome. i think this is very interesting. we saw on cnn this weekend, ana navarro one of the contributors actually said out loud what some of us have thought that they meant when they talk about abortion. she said she mentioned a bunch of family members of hers that have down syndrome, physical disabilities.
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she mentioned autism, a pretty large population these days. so my question to you, what did you make of that and is that eugenics? >> it is, absolutely. it is important that this country recognizes that every single life is precious. the decision that we had this weeks with one that passes now this authority down to the states where elected officials will make those decisions. in south dakota, we had a trigger law in place already. so as of today abortions are illegal in our state. and they're only allowed to save the life of the mother. i think it is entirely appropriate now we focus on taking care of women in crisis, that have unplanned pregnancy, see what we do to support them. maybe sure babies end up in homes that are good, loving adoptive homes and let the parents be parents. will: governor you mentioned the trigger law. you're the perfect person to ask this. yesterday we had the attorney general of louisiana on. tell us how that works. we know it takes effect
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immediately. we take the concept of a trigger law. what happens to abortion providers in south dakota as of this moment? how do you enforce the law as of this moment? what is the lay of the land in south dakota today? >> planned parent hood already stopped abortions in state of south dakota a month or two ago. that was good news. we had a state statute on the books if roe v. wade was ever overturned at the supreme court, immediately abortion was be illegal in our state except to save the life of a mother. so that went into effect. what we will do continue to focus on not punishing mothers or women. we'll focus on the doctors who knowingly break the law to perform abortions in the state of south dakota. pete: governor, what is your message to the next generation? the debate for roe has gone on over 50 years. a whole new drop of young people technology, it was am deck i can is not the right word but about rights and liberties. what is your message to all
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women as we move into the next chapter? >> it is about rights and liberties. every single life having right to live. technology developed, science revealed more and more what is going on in the womb. we know more today than we did 5 or 20 years ago. i think it is incredibly important to recognize every life is pressures. it deserves to be protected under the united states constitution. this will pass, rachel. what i think is interesting when i watch all the pundits on tv on the liberal media, talking about this a scare tactic as though the supreme court made a legislative decision. what this did with this decision that came out this week it gave authority to the states. it is going to allow us at the state level to make the best decision for our people. so every state will make different decisions. south dakota we're standing for life. i hope every single state follows our example. rachel: you're right. the pundits out there are definitely and democrat lawmakers are trying to scare
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women and create fear but it is also exposed a lot of ignorance about the constitution and civics, how this all works. this is really interesting. >> it is. what is interesting about how the decision was written was that specifically people don't have a constitutional right to an abortion. that every life has value, that every life should be protected. that this will go to elected representatives by the people to make the decisions at the state level. will: governor, as we mentioned you have a book coming out on tuesday, not my first rodeo, lessons "from the heartland." it is on sale tuesday. when was your first rodeo? >> my goodness, i don't remember. i was probably seven or eight years old. this is a book not necessarily about politics. it is about my life lived so far but it has some political stories in it, things people definitely do not know about me, my background or life but lessons. i love the way i grew up.
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i love my family. i think people will enjoy it. rachel: i know a bit about your life story. it is fascinating. i'm looking forward to read this book. if you didn't know will was a ranch hand. will: she is a real cowgirl. let's be careful. i'm all hat than cattle. rachel: come down to fox studios, a lasso contest. will: nope, nope. rachel: we go to the ranch to see you? >> we can do that, will. will, i've got a cowboy hat with your name on it. will: oh, sweet. >> we have a horse ready. we have a whole series of ranch rodeo events. will: i've been around buffalo. seen you around a buffalo roundup. pete: you rounded up buffalo too? will: i trailed, i had a trailer baby buffalo i hired from, sorry, north dakota, to western montana. let me tell you they're wild animals. they're not domestic cows. they are wild animal. >> will, i like you more and more every day.
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pete: working on it. rachel: i'm betting on you, governor. pete: for sure. we'll do that next year we do the 4th of july from mount rushmore with you. how about that? >> absolutely. it's a date. pete: the book is "not my first road yo, lessons from the heartland" on sale tuesday. governor kristi noem. >> thank you. pete: we have plans for the next 4th. rachel: holy land. pete: holy land, we're doing the holy land for, christmas. christmas of this year. holy land. then mount rushmore. will: making our plans. there is big news taking place across the country specifically in arizona where one of the biggest school choice bills really in decades has passed wherein they have vouchers. rachel did the interview a little earlier with cory deangelis who fought for school choice for a long time in the
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country, 7,000-dollar vouchers available in arizona. here is what rachel and cory talked about earlier about the expansion of school choice. >> this is clearly the biggest victory when it comes to school choice in u.s. history. every single family regardless of income, can take public school, private school, home based educational school option this is the way every state should do it. they should follow governor doug ducey's lead, republicans in the state legislature and house of arizona. look, republicans across the country saying there is a parent party but republicans in arizona just proved it. pete: this is phenomenal. rachel: this is huge. pete: it is. it flew under the radar. states had been flirting with things like this. arizona, to their credit, this is educational tax credit. dollars follow the parent to any
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institution they choose. maine had supreme court ruling you can take money, you can't block it from religious instruction, any tomorrow form of education. to the parents. talk about challenge of educational industrial complex who zoom schools are going there. this is good for republican politicians. it is not the right policy but good politics. parents have access to a school. $7,000 a year will not pay for every school. a lot schools built to respond to that option. creates more opportunities. rachel: this is historic because of roe v. wade overturning. it flew under the radar. this will be a new example how to do things. interesting on a couple of less. first, exposing the elitism of people like barack obama, hillary clinton, who you know, said we're for public schools, tried to shut down school choice. meanwhile when given the choice,
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they all have the money sent their kids to private school. these options are open to the poor, middle class, everybody. that money is our taxpayer dollars. the second part i fine interesting is the timing of this. this happened at the heels of the pandemic. and the pandemic exposed so much corruption, so much that parents didn't know was happening in their schools. you know the unions did this. we talked, i talked earlier about joe biden and the little sign on the gas tank that said you did this? donald trump for you know, roe v. wade, you did this. teachers unions, you did this in arizona. your corruption, the way that you have tried to indoctrinate children. usurp the rights of parents got for their education. good on arizona. i think this is trend you will not be able to stop. pete: this is huge shift. i remember republican party politics 10 years ago you were not supposed to say the word
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voucher. you were anti-education. you were not fully supportive of public schools. say it out loud. i love it. this idea of universal school choice we call it phase two of insurgency inside the book everyone has access to, "battle for the american mind." thank you for making number one on "the new york times" best-seller list. because of you, thirst parents and grandparents have for education. i haven't done much traveling for it. we'll do one. myself and david good win coauthor, will be at ronald reagan library in california. if you can catch a flight. we're signing books, giving a talk at the reagan library. if you're looking for a signed copy which we had not had yet, go to premier collectibles.com/battle, david and i will do a live signing on tuesday. you can ask us that.
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talk about the book live. signed copy of "battle for the american mind." only place to get one. >> congratulations. you finally put your harvard degreegood use. made the book number one which is driving liberals crazy. to the point. there is hunger for answers what is happening in arizona. i was a little bit pessimistic about this would go. will getting on me about my pessimism. i'm seeing more optimistic about america. seeing your book at number one, seeing what happened in america, seeing roe v. wade. things can get done. will: pete: i wake versus the woke. will: if you're up in california make plans for tuesday. lauren: yeah. will: turning now to your head
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lines first russian assault on ukraine's capital in early june. kyiv's mayor vitali klitschko announcing search and evacuation protocols for two damaged buildings. russian ally belarus targeting ukraine shelling a small village. the massive bombardment thankfully did not result in any casualties. in the alex murdaugh saga, curtis smith, who was allegedly higher so his son could get a eight figures life insurance pay without is charged with conspiracy charges. on top of suicide and insurance fraud charges. murdaugh last year was arrested after allegedly telling smith to shoot him in the head with a weapon he provided. if their scheme would have been successful, murdaugh's son would have received $10 million. seven-time olympic medalist,
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katie ledecky won the fifth consecutive title at 800-meter freestyle in the 202022 world championships. ledecky had eight consecutive wins. she has 22 medals, most of any female swimmer, second only to michael phelps with 26. those are the headlines. >> our next guest says the pro-life win is personal. one survive ad abortion, became the mother of three. the other born out of rape, adopted and now a wonderful father himself. their powerful message to preserve all life next. ♪ ♪
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♪. pete: 13 states either already banned abortions or will ban them by the end of the month following friday's supreme court decision overturning roe v. wade. jennifer millborn is an abortion survivor and mother of three who was adopted and raised by her aunt and uncle. pro-life leader ryan bomberger was conceived rape. he said circumstances like his are used to justify abortion. he was adopted into a diverse
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adoptive family of 15. they both join us now. jennifer, ryan, thanks so much for being here. two amazing stories. it brings you to the joy of this moment, even more than most. jennifer, let me start with you. an abortion survivor. you were ultimately adopted by your mother's sister and raised. you have now three kids of your own. coming from that background, reflect on this decision? >> wow, well, any abortion survivor has a very unique perspective on abortion and being that literally i'm the product of my birth mom's right to choose, whether to have me or not, i feel absolute blessing to be able to live this life, to be a part of this world. pete: you're here because the procedure ultimately failed, correct? >> correct. yeah. my gestation alley i was a little farther along than was anticipated. my head didn't fit in the tube
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of the vacuum aspiration procedure. pete: wow. >> she was told by the abortionist, more than likely would miss -- miss miscarry me. lo and behold i was born. pete: what a blessing. ryan, conceived in rape, unimaginable, then adoption. what a brave option in that case. talk to our viewers how that shapes your view. >> absolutely. i'm so grateful to my birth mom with that decision which will have reverberations for generations. i'm that 1%. thank god to my parents, shattered myth of unwanted child. i was first of adopted. nine more. pro-lifers don't carry about people after their born which is ridiculous. father of four, two of my kids were adopted.
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my wife faced unplanned pregnancy as teacher. she rejected violence of abortion. this has deep personal impact on me because of all these factors in my life. i just thank god that i'm now able to actually prove that triumph can rise from tragedy all the time. in fact i want to celebrate my dad who passed away on the anniversary of roe v. wade back last year. we have a fund called the henry and andrea bomb berger loving fund, to provide a home for vulnerable children. pete: you give me chills. >> i love adoption. pete: your radiance foundation focuses on disportionate impact of abortion on the black community as well? >> absolutely we were the first ones to launch a public ad campaign. to highlight planned parenthood's past and present racism. call them anti-racist organization today because this is laughable. they're the number one killer of black lives, killing 360 black
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lives every single day. pete: jennifer, your last word, what is the message to women who might be fearful because of fear-mongering around these issue? >> that is completely understandable and what i would say the reason i do what i do, there are lots of women out there who have a voice, they have people speaking for them obviously. we see it everywhere. and being that i did survive an abortion, someone has got to speak for those little lives that are not being spoken for. pete: jennifer, ryan, god bless you both. congratulations on the work you've done. the way you follow through on that, which is changing more generations of lives. god bless you both. >> god bless. pete: still ahead, securing our border. operation lonestar just turned back more than 22,000 migrants as fishes brace for growing caravans that are still on the move.
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texas congressman tony gonzales joins us next while his state is it taking action while the biden admin does zip. ♪ ♪ ♪ make way for the first-ever chevy silverado zr2. with multimatic shocks, rugged 33-inch tires, and front and rear electronic locking differentials. dude, this is awesome... but we should get back to work. ♪ ♪ this good? perfect. if you're gonna work remote... work remote. find new workspaces. find new roads. chevrolet. we're a different kind of dentistry. one who believes in doing anything it takes to make dentistry work for your life. so we offer a complete exam and x-rays free to new patients without insurance - everyday.
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>> number one answer, this bill if signed into law would have stopped uvalde shooting. the person should not have been able to purchase the firearm. not because he was 18, or a ar, because he was mentally unstable that would have been found out if there was extensive background checks during juvenile years. there was other bills democrats put forward because i voted for all of those, because they would not have answered that. i think it is important, now that it is signed into law, all 4 pa members of congress need to secure these grants. i represent 119 cities and towns. we're trying to get ready for the school year. this week alone we submitted six grant applications to help harden our schools and help mental health as well. rachel: wow. so what has been the reaction in your district to this? >> yeah. no. i have kept, i have kept my gun manufacturers, my gun
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enthusiasts, informed every step of the way. cornyn and i were talking daily as the senate was working on things. to me, everybody represents their district. to me this was always about what my district thought and what they needed. like i said i kept my gun manufacturers involved. insured this would not infringe on the second amendment. do i believe in red flag laws? no, i don't believe in red flag laws. this bill does not federalize red flag laws. i know my state of texas won't take a penny of that money. i encourage other states to do the same. rachel: what do you say to people who believe in the second amendment who believe this legislation is slippery slope for taking guns? >> i disagree with them. i say, look at the legislation. i also say many of the national gun organizations were involved every step of the way and during this process as well. to me i look at it, i don't see it as a gun bill this is a mental health bill. $11 billion, the largest mental
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health investment in our nation's history. we have a mental health crisis. we always talk about it. we have to do something about it. now that it is passed into law every member of congress should fight for the dollars to bring them back home. rachel: a lot of people say we have mental health crisis. wonder why it would be wrapped up in this bill. we have a lot this crisis a while. a lot of people are happy about this. a lot of second amendment people are really concerned about the other aspects of this bill. we'll see how it plays out, what kind of reaction you get. congressman gonzalez happy to have you on the show to give your point of view. do you have another thought? i have a couple sections left here. >> in uvalde, it is 80 miles from the border and the border crisis hasn't stopped. just a few days ago our teachers are getting ready for school. and you had a lockdown. imagine you gone through the incident. now you have a lockdown, saying a high-speed chase coming
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through your town. we can't lose our eye off the ball. the border crisis is as bad as it ever has been. my district is on the forefront of it. thank you, rachel. rachel: thank you. president biden said the decision to overturn roe v. wade makes america an out lie year when it comes to women's rights but is that the case. pete goes on the wall. moore than 40,000 national guard troops could be dismissed this week. we'll tell you why next. whenever heartburn strikes get fast relief with tums. it's time to love food back. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums ♪
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if vyvgart could be right for you. ♪. pete: before heading overseas joe biden bash being the supreme court's abortion ruling. he argues freedom is on the decline, will, in the u.s. compared to other nations. take a watch. president biden: this decision, conservative majority of the supreme court shows how extreme it is. it made the united states an outlyer among developed nations in the world. pete: so the question is, will, are we extreme now or were we extreme before? will: the united states is outlier in the context of the world. you have seen people, i seen people on the refer to this as the "american taliban." is it true? look at western countries across the world. what their laws are when it comes to abortion, see how it might compare to for example, republican led state governments in this country.
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go off the wall for more. start with poland. in poland, which was up just a moment ago, you can only arrive at an abortion in extreme circumstances. basically banned but for extreme circumstances. then for the rest of europe. pete: rape, incest, life of the mother absolutely. will: ireland, germany, italy, banned at 12 and 13 weeks of pregnancy. pete: put that in context. mississippi law that was struck down that led to the overturning of roe v. wade, was 15 weeks, which was deemed extreme by the left, right? right now, america is only one of six countries across the world where you effectively have, before roe v. wade was overturned abortion on demand where you can terminate a pregnancy at any point. this is ireland, germany, italy, except for extreme exceptions, 12 weeks, 12 weeks, 13 weeks, abortion is banned. these are not outlier countries.
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these are countries we're meeting with in the g7 that have far more stringent abortion laws than america did prior to roe v. wade. will: it was not joe biden mischaracterizing united states place in the world. one of those was by emannuel macron of france. he said the following, we'll put it up on screen for you, he said abortion is fundamental right for all women. it must be protected. i wish to express my solidarity with the women whose liberty are the undermined by the supreme court of the united states. emannuel macron of france. check in on france. france, it's possible after 14 weeks of pregnancy but only in exceptional circumstances. by the way, that 14 weeks is something that is mirrored in austria and in spain as well. pete as you point out, 14 weeks of pregnancy is more restrictive than the law in mississippi led
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to supreme court overturning roe v. wade. pete: we were told it was extreme. it was 12 weeks. until recently macron had it moved to 14. use tria, very difficult to find an abortion facility. historically christian nations, doctors and hots, while it may be legal prior to a certain point who refuse to do the procedure to begin with. a reflection ever the eat ethos in those countries, may be legal early but safe and rare. anything beyond 14 weeks to be extreme. will: before we move on to the final slide, i want to share a tweet from one more leader, justin trudeau of canada. he said the following, no government politician or man can tell a woman what she can do and cannot do with your body. i want the women of canada know we will stand up for your right to choose. i will ask justin trudeau, two
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questions. what is a woman. pete: good question. will: were you telling every man, woman and canada what they had to put in their body when did came to covid vaccine. pete: feeding what joe biden saying to the rest of world as he heads to gthat america is evil place. it is become impossible for women to live in. in actuality the lot of rest of world had restriction on abortion for quite some time, except, will, for countries that had similar laws to what we had, for quite some time. two countries with much broader options for abortion. who might they be? china and north korea? nine million abortions performed in 2020 in communist china. in north korea, effectively available upon request. so when we talk about these six countries that effectively allowed for abortion on demand,
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messenger was alongside china and north korea and a few others. on the other side of the ledger are all the other countries that we mentioned who see a limit to what should be done to a baby inside of a mother's womb. will: when joe biden says the united states is a outlier, he is correct. not because it is the "american taliban," more restrictive than western europe we're more reflective in our liberal policies to abortion of north korea and china than we are of the rest of the developed world. until we see perhaps some laws from state to state across the united states in the wake of roe v. wade. pete: it will be interesting to see if the blue states want to be more like north korea and china going forward. whether or not red states will restrict it more often consensus of the world. will: going into this by the way on the will cain podcast, tomorrow. three new episodes every week. we have a deep dive tomorrow on the decision by the supreme court ever the united states and its implications. we go to rachel for additional
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headlines. rachel: pete, that was so informative, not surprising that justin trudeau, a communist at heart agrees more with the north koreans and chinese on abortion. pete: true. rachel: thanks, guys. always love it when you guys go to the wall. turning now to your headlines, a community is reeling after a man is killed by a massive 11-foot alligator at a myrtle beach yacht club fried. the gator grabbed the man and took him into nearby retention pond. the gator was captured and euthanized. another resident of high-end neighborhood posting a picture of three giant alligators on twitter last month warning that the predators were in the area. as many as 40,000 national guard troops could be dismissed because they are not vaccinated against covid-19. this making up about 13% of the national guard. members about the national guard have until thursday to get the
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vaccine. last year defense secretary lloyd austan ordered all active military reserve servicemembers to be vaccinated. this is one of the most outrageous stories that we're reporting. check this out with, a punk rock hairstyle and a tongue always sticking out of his mouth, mr. happy face took home the top prize on world's ugliest dog competition. take a look. >> here is our champion. meet mr. happy face, the incredible, ugliest dog on the entire planet. rachel: that award looks about right. owner saying she adopted the champion pooch during the pandemic. when she first saw him, she knew he deserved a second chance, to be loved. i agree with that. those are your headlines. turn to rick reichmuth for fox weather forecast. a dog lover.
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what do you think of that dog? rick: that was amazing. that is mexican dog. you should know that. google that. >> i love chihuahuas. i didn't know about this one. rick: 45 seconds to google it while i do the weather. talk a bit about the weather. we have big changes really welcome across the central part of the country. look at that. 52 tee grease in fargo. 67 in kansas city. that is behind the front. you see the front cutting across the central part of the country. to the north and is where cooler air, to the south and east. eventually, everybody even down across parts of the south will get break from oppressive heat well over a week, breaking all kinds of temperatures. rain across parts of florida. across the southwest we have early start to the monsoon season. next five to six days look very wet. we have fires across parts of
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new mexico. incredible drought. next seven days precipitationwise, a lot of rain coming in parts of new mexico and parts of colorado. desperately need it. back to you. >> thank you, rick. coming up trace adkins surprising usfl fans with a surprise playoff performance. he first sat down with abby hornacek to reflect on his decades long career. >> how good a job you do every day you have to get up and do it tomorrow. i think i brought the same mentality into the music business. >> abby joins us live with more next. ♪
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will: the filled definitely stars and birmingham stallions are off to the usfl championship game. rachel: in between yesterday's playoffs, country music star trace adkins excited fans with this special performance. pete: abby hornacek got a chance to chat with him before he took to the stage. she joins us from the rock and roll hall of fame in cleveland. abby. good morning. reporter: good morning, you guys. that is right, inaugural championship game is set. while fans came to watch those
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thrilling matchups yesterday they showed up for something else. you said it was to watch country music star trace adkins to perform. i was lucky enough to catch up with him before he took the stage. check it out. ♪. reporter: we're at tom benson hall of fame stadium where trace adkins is about to take the stage to perform between the first two playoff games for the u.s. fl we wandered into the parking lot. i think this might be his bus? it looks like. we'll see. >> hello. reporter: trace, how is it going? >> abby, it is great. ♪♪ reporter: trace, level with me, 25 years in the industry, you sold over 11 million albums. you have over two billion streams. what is the key to your success?
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>> i always attributed any successive had with the work ethic that i learned in the oil field. i worked in the oil field for ten years before i started doing this. it always was no matter how good of a job you did today, you have to get up and do it again tomorrow. i think i brought that the same work ethic and mentality into the music business. ♪ reporter: you've maintained your humility. you're just so humble. how do you keep that going, even though you're a multiplatinum recording artist? >> oh, you know, i just, i'm not a big fan of me, never have been and i'm glad that some people are but, you know, i, i enjoy doing what i do. i'm thankful every day that i have had this opportunity. i know that every time i come on this stage only reason i get through because you allow me to. i don't take it for granted.
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thank you very much. reporter: you still find time for our military. you had 12 uso tours, performed for over 65,000 military members. why do you find it important to honor our men and women in uniform? >> it is the highlight of my career. it is rewarding, more satisfying, i tell people if you have a chance to associate with, hang out with heroes, you should do that they're cool and maybe some of it will rub off on you. so. >> trace adkins. [cheers and applause] reporter: what is your pre-show ritual? >> nothing. i watch some football. i don't have ritual. i am not superstitious for that stuff. i don't warm up. i shouldn't say this. a. reporter: are you ready to perform, get going? >> sure. reporter: all right. we're on other way to the stadium now. is there anything that goes through your mind when you play,
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doing this so long but, do you ever get nervous? >> i get nervous before i sing the national anthem every time. i still get nervous. if you mess that up, you're on youtube for the rest of your life. everybody knows the words. if you mess it up, if i mess up the words to one of my own songs, that's my own song. i can do whatever i want. reporter: do a remix. >> that's right. pete: i here the cheers. the soon the cheers are for you, trace. >> i hope so. reporter: thank you for spending time with us. ♪. >> thank you, usfl. thank you, father. appreciate it. reporter: guys, no warm-up. that surprised me. he nailed it on stage. i guess only warm-up was talking
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to us. he was so gracious and kind and welcoming on his bus. we learned all about his time in the oil fields. how much that taught him humility, hard work. i asked him who he was pulling for the in usf semis, he is a huge lou holtz fan. pulling for skip holtz's stallions. i guess he will have somebody to watch in the chip game, guys. will: thank you, abby. pete: great patriot. will: you do up on stage and do a little bit of comedy? do a little bit of singer, songwriter, rock star. pete: at some point love to do that. i don't have the moves for it. that is on the list. i like to dance too. not well. rachel: he is actually a pretty good singer. by the way of -- will: why do you say that? have you heard him sing? rachel: have you heard him sing? pete: my generation. rachel: he was in choir.
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pete: i was in choir. will: i forgot about choir. i forgot about choir. songbird of his generation. rachel: the supreme court is set to rule this week on the case of high school football coach fired for praying on the field. he will join us live on his fight for faith coming up. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ introducing the all-new infiniti qx60. take on your wild world in style. ♪ with less moderate-to-severe eczema, why hide your skin if you can help heal your skin from within? hide my skin? not me. dupixent helps keep you one step ahead of eczema,
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matching your job description. visit indeed.com/hire ♪ go big or go home. ♪ go, go, go big or go home ♪♪ rachel: good morning, everybody. it's 8 a.m., and it is east coast time, by the way. i i want to to welcome all of you to "fox & friends" this morning and say good morning to my cohosts, will and pete. pete: good morning, rachel. rachel: good morning to all of you.
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will: did we get this a wrong? hamp beach, new hampshire? will: new hampshire doesn't have is beaches, does it? is it not landlocked? pete: it does have a tiny little sliver that sticks out there. let me check that. let me check the old map. i think they have a little -- it's vermont that's landlocked. will: new hampshire's on the east side of -- president it's got a little sliver. between massachusetts and maine? wow, i didn't know new hampshire a had beaches. iowa ray are i with was not here yesterday. i had another party at my house yesterday for all my family and friends. my daughter got married, both of you came to the wedding. there's my daughter and her gorgeous wedding dress. she's wearing my colm that you see there in the back.
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what a great time, i have to say. pete: oh, that shot. she looked beautiful, by the way. rachel: thank you. it was a mass that will told me was a little too long -- [laughter] will said, first of all, it was very, like, latin. and, by the way, i want to thank the three priests there who did the mass for us. there was incense and bells -- will: the whole thing. rachel: i walked out, and i saw will and the first thing i said was, i told you i was catholic. [laughter] so they got the full catholic experience. it was a great time. lots of kids. i would say a third of the guest list was under the age of 20. a lot of little kids as well including the hell zits, who -- leg hegseths who, by the way, party harder than their dad. [laughter] my daughter got married very young with, she's 22 years old,
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and the college kids were dancing, and their, like, who are these kids? partying hard. pete: they had a great time. before that, by the way, the hegseth clan was two rows behind the cains -- will: i love this part. from my perspective, seven kids, he had them all. very catholic ceremony. my wife turned to me, halftime, somewhere around there. pete's kids are really good. and then i swear about that that time i heard gwen go to her mom, youngest, mommy, it's really long. [laughter] and jen goes, shh. and she did can her, mommy, it's really long. [laughter] pete: i mean, i was looking at 'em the whole time -- it's good for kids to be bored for an hour. will: i love that.
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pete: they did a good job. beautiful ceremony. i was watching will during the ceremony, he was, like -- [laughter] will: the viewers will figure i can't sit still for that that long, but i loved it. [laughter] i really did. it was a wonderful ceremony. it was great to see your family all together. sean was such a proud father, and i don't think he'll mind me saying this, tears in his eyes as he walked her down the aisle. rachel: trying to keep it in, but he couldn't, he was crying. will: but it was awesome to see. rachel: i really appreciate it. i felt like the bagpipes that led the way out, very irish. her bouquet had shamrocks in it many honor of her dad, sean patrick duffy. so, yeah, it was beautiful. like, the wedding had so many kids, it was a pro-life wedding. pete: yeah, service. rachel: that morning when the roe v. wade decision was made, we were all preparing, getting
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creased, starting to get everyone -- i got a text from your wife, pete, saying what an amazing to men. my priests were e-mailing me and texting me. friends and family, my mom came into my room and was like, oh, my gosh, what a great day. evita has been in the pro-life movement since she was a kid, was part of wisconsin's right to life, went to camp as a teenager, wrote her thesis on margaret sanger at the university of chicago, so she is somebody who's toiled in the movement even though she's only 22. so so anyway, it was a great day. service a beautiful day. pete: before we go, let's put up that photo of the three of us together at the wedding. oh, yeah, we don't have it because we forgot to -- rachel: dancing starting before the din dinner. pete: it did. thanks for inviting us.
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rachel: all right. we begin this hour with a fox news alert. celebrations continuing across the country following the supreme court, stunning reversal of roe v. wade. will: democrats are fuming, looking to president biden to take drastic action. pete: alexandria hoff is live at the supreme court. >> reporter: hi, good morning, guys. yeah, we're expecting more protesters out here later today, several hundred were out here yesterday. actually, two ap are rementions were made after red paint that was supposed to symbolize blood was poured over some of the security gates, so two people taken into custody. there were people, of course, celebrating this decision yesterday as well. police mostly dealt with shouting matches that took place over course of day. service a whole different kind of scene in colorado where authorities responded early yesterday morning to a fire that was set at life choices pregnancy center in longmont. the building was covered in
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graffiti, abortions aren't safe and neither are you, on that building. in oregon 10 people were arrested for disorderly conduct after a crowd zeroed in on a crisis pregnancy center there. arrests reported in new york for vandalism after thousands of protesters took to the streets starting friday. in arizona though, this is a big deal, several people were arrested for tearing down fences at the state capitol and this comes after protesters attempted to breach the doors of the state senate prompting the deployment of tear gas. yesterday more than 30 democratic senators wrote a letter to president biden urging him to use, quote, the full force of the federal government to protect access to abortion in the united states. and here's what the president said that he can do when it comes to state abortion policies. listen. >> my administration's going to focus on how hay administer and whether or not they violate other laws like deciding not to allow people across statement laws to get public health services. and we're going to take actions
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to protect women's rights and reproductive health. >> reporter: now, the white house has maintained that the president is not in favor of expanding the court. protesters out here yesterday said that they would like to see the supreme court disbanded. will, rachel, or pete? will: thank you, alexandria. they'd like to see the supreme court disbanded, talks of packing the supreme court, conversations over term limits. i imagine the conversation will go there even though the biden administration has actually been fairly clear, we're not considering packing the supreme court. pete: yeah. the irony that you pointed out so well yesterday is that in the maim of saving democracy, they're rejecting a decision which sends the choice back to the people and the representatives. rachel: they don't want that. pete: no, they don't. they want their political power, and there's one branch they don't control right now, and it drives them nuts. expect that as a campaign issue going forward. rachel: a little earlier we had
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governor kristi noem who signed into law in her home state legislation that would ban a abortions based on the diagnosis of downs syndrome. interestingly, yesterday -- the or in this past week after this decision was made, i guess she made this comment on saturday, ana navarro, who is a cnn contributor as well as a sometime cohost on "the view" gave her views on abortion and why she hi thinks it's important. she actually justified abortion for her own relatives with special needs. it was very troubling, some saudis gusting. take a look, make your decision. >> i have a brother who's 57 and has the mental and motor skills of a 1-year-old with, and i have a granddaughter who was born with downs syndrome, and i've got another, a step grand with son who is autistic. their mothers -- in that society or in that community will tell you that they considered suicide
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because that's how difficult it is to get help. and so why can i be catholic and still think this is a wrong decision? because i'm american. will: so, obviously, you hear there ana navarro making the argument there for the difficulties to justify abortion, the difficulties justify ending a life. i do think she's tried to clarify that and say it's about the services, that you don't have access to services -- pete: but why are you talking about -- will: which is, by the way, something you can speak to directly. but it doesn't really matter, because what you're talking about is in the alternative death. pete: correct. rachel: it's eugenics. there's no -- ana navarro is a eugenicist. she just said that to the world just now. because it can be difficult to have a child with special -- by the way, she included even not just physical handicap, not just downs sin concern syndrome which
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we know that community is being exterminated. in the school district where i live, there hasn't been a child with downs syndrome in, like, ten years. it tells you a lot. but she also, interestingly, she has a cohost at cnn who has a child with autism, and here's what she tweeted: i have never meant a parent of an autistic child who said they wished they'd aborted him or her. amen. good for her to peek up. will: i did not know that, by the way, about her child, and good for her. it is an incredibly ugly sentiment that was just displayed. and you're right, it is. when we were kids, you could cothis anecdotally and statistically, i went to school with kids who had downs
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syndrome. almost every class meaning first grade, second grade, third grade. now you don't see any because the abortion rate is over 90%. rachel: and i'll tell you this, if you could diagnose if autism, i wonder what the rate for autism would be. will: wow. rachel: it's interesting. there is a eugenic mentality for people with special needs. it says a lot about our society that that would be what the answer is -- pete: that's the logical end tate of your thinking if you believe that men and women should control whether or not a fetus becomes a born life are, then you can look whatever variables and factors you can look at, you should be able to decide this is a good one, this is a bad one, i'm going to decide whether to take the life or not. so through that cost benefit analysis, you might say these are less worthy lives, so we should abort. rachel: right. who gets to decide who is sufficiently human enough or perfect enough according to ana
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navarro own joy life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness? will: the hardship of someone else. like it's a mother's choice, it's a mother's body. who gets to tell a woman what to do with her body, right? totally ignoring there's another body involved in the equation. and i guess what she's saying is how difficult it is to raise a child with special needs. it's not about your difficulty, it's about the life of that child and whether or not it's worth existence. pete: that's why they've wanted -- i just said it myself, fetus, clump of cells, that it's not a baby or a human life, to rationalize the idea that you would get rid of it. rachel: the entire pro-choice movement is built around a lot of lies, a lot of slogans, a lot of euphemisms meant to disguise the brutality and violence of what abortion truly is. and you had such a great interview earlier today, pete, with two abortion survivors, one who survived an abortion herself, the other was the product of a rape who he said,
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you know, i'm one percent who justifies all these other abortions. i'm so happy to have my life out of this tragedy my mother went through. so many blessings and thanked the parents who ended up adopting him. pete: there's some interviews that you get chills, and that was one of them. and then you look at the adoption, really special. special place in heaven -- rachel: actually, let's play some of that, because this was such a powerful interview. >> just thank god that i'm now able to actually prove that triumph can rise from tragedy all the time. i'm literally that 1% that 100% of the time justify abortion. but i thanked god my parents, two of the most pro-life people i've ever known, shattered the myth. >> i'm the product of my birth with mom's right to choose whether to have me or not. i feel it an absolute blessing to be a part of this world.
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there are lots of women out there who have a voice. obviously, we see it everywhere, and if being that i did survive an abortion, someone has got to speak for those little lives that aren't being spocken for. spoken there are. -- spoken for. rachel: out of tragedy, triumph, said ryan. someone conceived out of rape. he said shattering the myth of the unwanted child. i still remember mother teresa when she was alive talking about how peace would never come to the world until we ended the scourge of abortion and saying there is no such thing as an unwanted child. i'll take any child. and again, just beautiful. pete: yep. and jennifer mill born survived an abortion, now a mother of three herself. god bless her. will: all right. coming up, gas prices could soon drop by up to 20 cents a gallon, but find out why gas experts are warning the pain -- relief at the pump may only be temporary.
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plus, we'll check in with abby hornacek as she talks to the coaches and stars of the birmingham stallion withs ahead of the championship game. ♪ ♪ timatic shocks, rugged 33-inch tires, and front and rear electronic locking differentials. dude, this is awesome... but we should get back to work. ♪ ♪ this good? perfect. if you're gonna work remote... work remote. find new workspaces. find new roads. chevrolet.
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headlines, new reports is show hunter biden took meetings with several old quackers while joe biden was -- oligarchs while biden was the second most powerful man mt. world closely aligned with vladimir putin including one who's now wanted for murder. the meeting occurred in february of 2012, and it's unclear what exactly he was looking for, but the trip was part of a two-day meet and greet focused on seeking international funding for his business partners. those trips came prior to russia's aggression in ukraine during the obama administration. drivers could see some relief at gas pump next month, gasbuddy saying prices could drop by 20 cents, but that would be temporary since prices have been falling since they peaked at $5.03 on june 13th. officials think we could see a super spike in fuel prices later this summer because of high volatility. and in the nhl, colorado
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avalanche have another chance to close out the stanley cup final tonight. they'll have to do it on road. the tampa bay lightning keeping their chances alive with a 3-2 win in denver on friday night. if tampa wins tonight, we'll go to the a game seven which will be played on tuesday. if the avalanche win, they hoist the stanley cup for the third time in franchise history. and those are youred headlines. really ray that that will be amazing, a game to watch. pete: you'll be watching. rachel: you guys too. well, the philadelphia stars are shining yesterday as they stunned the new jersey generals in a major upset, advancing to the championship game with a 19-14 win. meanwhile, the birmingham stallions continued their winning streak beating new orleans 31-17 to face the stars in the league finale. let's head back down to cleveland where fox nation host abby hornacek is live with both winning coaches.
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pete: philadelphia stars' coach bart and stallions, skip holtz. abby, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, you guys. while you were watching those nhl games, we are watching these thrilling usfl games. both head coaches joining me, congratulations to both of you. huge victory. coach andros, i'll start with you. i looked up at halftime, you guys are winning 10-0 #, and then again with just 11 minutes left, you had lost the lead. what did you tell your players to help get them back on track? >> you're going to these games anticipating they're going to play a little different than they have all year because it's a playoff game. and there's a lot of -- factored into that game. you know, we went in, you know, saying, hey, something might happen. and so the thing you want to do is respond when it happens. don't react to it, respond. and they did. >> reporter: and, coach holtz,
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you with guys have maintained a near perfect record this entire telephone. -- season. you're now 10-1. how have you cap your success on the field? >> i just stand on the sideline and watch. [laughter] we've got players out there making great plays, competing their tails off. they love the game, and that's been one of the more rewarding things for me, the way they've responded, the way they've come together and played game. we've got some really quality players as everybody's had talent, but the way they've come together is one of the big reasons this that we've had success on the field. >> reporter: and just from both of you, i just want to get your final thoughts going into the championship game next week. >> well, just enjoy the experience and together, you know? enjoy that experience together. that's something that they'll remember for the rest of their lives. >> we always talk about, you know, the destination, where we're all trying to get. everybody talks about the trophy and there's a landmark, a final destination. we keep talking about journey. it's the trip along the way,
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it's the relationships we're building, interacting with people, just the experiences we're having on a day-to-day basis. we know we're going to play a really good football team, it's going to be a great game, we're excited to have the opportunity to represent the city of birmingham. >> reporter: i was hoping you were going to give away some trade secrets. [laughter] i tried my best. july 3rd is the championship game, i heard there's going to be a "fox & friends" performance at halftime. pete: really? >> reporter: may join you. i don't know, it's breaking news, so maybe -- pete: not a bad idea. will: thank you, abby. good luck to both coaches. >> reporter: thank the, guys. rachel: thanks, abby. pete: coming up -- will: more "fox & friends." [laughter] pete: we were ready to talk -- rachel: actually, i do have something to say. do we have 30 seconds? my cousin was at the wedding, and she wanted to give you something. will: me? rachel: and she didn't get a chance to, so here it is.
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will: you sent me yesterday -- can. rachel: listen, there's a note inside for you. she said tell pete not to get -- she loves you too -- i'll read it to you. hi, will. our "fox & friends" superman. i meant to go up to you at the wedding, but i didn't get the chance to let you know we had brought this collectible. you may not want to claim the title, but you reflect the virtues, values and beauty of the true superman. bless you and your family and continued blessing. this is from my cousin. will: well, iish wish i would have met her. well, thank you. if that is really nice. of. pete: and at the top of the 9:00 hour, i have something to add to that as well. will: oh, you do? [laughter] on the note of superman, something i came across yesterday which will bring a smile -- rachel: do you love this new title that we've given you?
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will: one individual -- rachel: will's embracing it. do you like it? will: the power of one man. pete: one little 6-year-old named rex has unleashed the whirlwind. rachel: all right. still ahead, more americans are embracing conservative beliefs and faith and leaning red. our next guest is a evangelical leader who who -- in the midterms. ♪ my asthma felt anything but normal. ♪ ♪ it was time for a nunormal with nucala. nucala reduces asthma attacks it's a once-monthly add-on treatment for severe eosinophilic asthma. not for sudden breathing problems. allergic reactions can occur. get help right away for swelling of face, mouth, tongue, or trouble breathing. infections that can cause shingles have occured.
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♪ rachel: a recent fox news poll reveal having more than half of hispanic voters disapprove of president biden's job performance, and according to our next guest who is leader of the world's largest hispanic
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evangelical organization, u.s. latinos are moving away from the democrats as many of them -- more of them embrace conservative beliefs. if reverend samuel rodriguez jr. is the president of national hispanic christian leadership conference. he joins us now. reverend, no question that the evangelical vote in the hispanic community is a big part of this, but this idea that suddenly hispanics became conservative or religious just doesn't make sense to me as a hispanic woman who has known our conservative values for so long. what has woken up hispanics to the knowledge that the democrat party does not embrace the values of the hispanic community? >> first of all, thank you for having me. it's a new day. so we are natural conservatives, right? but we have come to the reality the democratic party has become such an extreme extremist party as it pertains to life -- by the way, hallelujah and god answers
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prayers. life, religious liberty, biblical justice. the moment the democratic party started to embrace that socialist, communist mantra, latinx, it's a repudiation of who we are. it's not that latinos are all of a sudden having a, you know, come to jesus moment, a road to damascus encounter, it's that the democratic party is literally mother-in-lawing -- emerging as an anti-latino party. surprise, surprise, surprise. rachel: it's interesting because some democrats are saying, well, roe v. wade will galvanize our voters. well, maybe it will galvanize a few liberal suburban moms, but it's going to alienate, right? >> overplaying their hand. even the idea of individuals coming into churches, you are literally coming against, no joke, all of a sudden studies have undergirded it, you're coming against latino community. we're seeing an go cuts like
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never before -- exodus like never before. rachel: yeah. you know i've worked in hispanic grassroots organizations before i came to fox. i have never seen a movement like this. it's unprecedented. it's more than anyone ever thought would happen. and we awe some -- saw some movement in 2020 with president trump, right? we saw hispanic men. what's fascinating is how many hispanic women are now turning to the republican party. >> yeah. how many latinas embrace the idea of late term abortion? rau e ray right. >> find me one that that says, yes, i believe in late term, partial birth and even postbirth abortion. gavin fewsome is completely off in california, others like him. all of these policies, it's actually serving as a firewall against engaging latinos. it works for the conservative movement. rachel: yeah. what i've seen as well, rev recommend, is that a lot of -- reverend, is that a lot of
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democrat candidates and politicians actually try to hide their pro-choice positions or even their school -- they're against school choice, so they hide those, the that from the voters. i think what's happening now is that's being exposed maybe for the first time. quickly give me your response to that. >> it's not just life are, it's parental rights, it's limited government, it's up into nearship promising latinos to say, it's time. rachel: yeah. well, reverends often have hair pulse on the hispanic community. you certainly do. reverend rodriguez, thanks for joining us this beautiful sun morning. >> thank you for having me. rachel: all right. a growing list of corporations are taking cues from pro-abortion activists after the supreme court decision to overturn roe v. wade. vivek ramaswamy joins us on how the work force wokeness could hurt companies' bottom lines. ♪
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will: right now president biden is overseas many germany for the g7. you're seeing live pictures of the world's leaders this coming together for global meeting in germany. pete: they call it the family photo at the g7, lining up as those seven largest economic countries in the world come together to talk about, among other things, the global supply chain, war in ukraine, food shortages and, of course, their a favorite, climate change. will: let's bring in morgan ortegus who's with us to take a look and tell us about these events in germany. rachel: morgan, good morning. >> good morning, guys. rachel: so so far leaders have been talking about ukraine, they've also talked about the u.s. and the e.u.'s cooperation in handling china, but they're also talking about climate
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change. what do you make of all of this? are these the most important, pressing issues that they should be talking about given the fact that, you know, we're looking at potentially famine, global food shortages and, of course, the situation in ukraine? why is climate change even on that agenda? >> well, that is for the biden administration, for president biden, that is the most important agenda item for him. that is the guiding principle through which all policy decisions, both foreign and domestic, are made by this administration. i'm certainly not saying that's right or i agree with that, but just as in the trump administration when i worked for him and mike pompeo, we made every decision based off the rationale of america first, what is best for americans, the biden administration every decision they make, every policy they make is on -- is based on climate change even when they're dealing with china. for example, you were just talking about that. we know there's are an ongoing
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genocide in schoen january where the chinese communist party forces women to have forced abortions, force9 sterilizations. even that agenda item is off to the side for favor of climate change sessions with the chinese. will but interestingly, morgan, criticism of the united states supreme court doesn't seem to be off the agenda. there you see president biden, justin trudeau of canada, emmanuel macron, olaf schultz of germany, boris johnson, mario mario draghi of italy, several of those leaders, trudeau and macron to name two, have had critical words of the united states' supreme court, morgan. >> yeah. it struck me as a foreign policy person, as someone who has worked in this space my whole career, it was very surprising to me. typically, in ally ared countries we don't -- allied countries we don't get involved
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in domestic political affairs. also you're with talking about countries that actually have much more conservative abortion policies than many states in the united states. so that was certainly a surprise to me especially because many of us, myself included, have been fighting tooth and nail to get these leaders to speak out more to the clear genocide in xinjiang. so again it's the issue of people that are left of center that feel comfortable criticizing the united states, but because their number one trading partner is china, they don't speak up for the human rights atrocities that are happening there. pete: very true. morgan ortegus, thanks for for giving us insight as these leaders get together in germany for the g7, thanks so much. rachel: thank you, morgan. >> thank you. will: all right. more backlash for big tech as meta, the parent company of facebook, employees reveal staff are not allowed to have open discussions about the supreme court's decision to overturn roe v. wade.
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that software engineer who revealed is writing on linkedin and, quote, we are not allowed to discuss on our internal workplace platform. moderators swiftly remove comments. the respectful communications policy that was put in place explicitly kiss allows it. here to react -- disallows it. here to react, vivek ramaswamy. you know, the funny thing is, vivek, i don't think i would a problem with this, that a company says, hey, let's not discuss this on our internal message boards. i would say that from my perspective not because you're endorsing one position, but this is where we do business. we don't need to sort political and social issues out on my internal message board, but my suspicion is, vivek, it probably is more about a position than it is business. >> so, look, if people are consistent about keeping politics out of the workplace, i'm a fan of that, will. that would fit the bill very
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well if coo sheryl sandberg had not a made a one-sided statement on facebook's own platform about this heated political issue. and moving beyond facebook, we're seeing this happening at companies across the country. in my view, it's clear: there are heated political questions that citizens are divided on and should work out through the political process. companies immediate to stay out of it. and -- need to stay ott of it. the top brass was weighing in at facebook while they were telling their everyday employees not to. we are starting to see at companies across country, and my number one piece of advice to those companies is leave politics to politics so you can focus on making products for people who need them rather than tilting the scales on those political questions. will: perfectly put. if the ceo can voice is his opinion, why can't the employees? by the way, we reached out to meta for a statement, we have not heard back. i want to ask you about this, an
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increasing number of companies, vivek, are offering for their employees to travel from from state to state if they're in a state that's going to outlaw abortion. it's a huge list. they will reimburse their employees for travel. you can see on your screen for viewers all of the companies that have essentially said we'll pay for employees to access abortion. you know, there's a lot of things, vivek, where we say, look, this is new, this is unprecedented when actually it's happened in the past in american history. but i don't think corporations have ever in american history been as openly political. >> i think that's absolutely right. i think it's bad for our democracy because we require these apolitical spaces in the private sector to bring us together whether or not we're red or blue or black or white in these divided times. and once the private sector becomes politicized, i think that actually causes us to lose the solidarity we need in a divided polity. let's listen to the argument these companies make, you know,
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we need to recruit the best talent, and this is really just about actually including the bottom line over long run. that's what they say. i think it's a sham argument, and i think it's important we see through it because many reality you could say that states could say you could get medical marijuana in certain states and not others, you could have said that. it wouldn't have been any more true there than it is here. it's really just corporate virtue signaling. and at the end of the day, i think that's what's driving the behavior more than my concern about bottom line. and the last point i'll make is there is no free lunch, right? employee benefits are one hole. if you redistribute that to certain employees, other employees are left holding the bag, and if not, shareholders are left holding bag. will: i don't know the veracity of this, a writer actually out of europe also say it's -- said it's unique globally. corporate leaders don't take these standses on every issue, this is something american
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corporations are doing more and more and more. vivek ramaswamy, always good the talk to you. >> good to talk to you. will: still ahead, john rich is putting on his blue suede shoes for a tour of graceland. what he learned about the king of rock and roll, next. ♪ well, you can do anything but don't take my but suede shoeses. ♪♪ to support a strong immune system your body needs a routine. centrum helps your immune defenses every day, with vitamin c, d and zinc* season after season.
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pete: elvis could become the king of the box office, projected to bring in more than $30 million this opening weekend. rachel: but just how close is the biopic to the real life king of rock and roll? will: country music singer john rich visited graceland to find out. hey, john. >> hey, how's everybody doing? rachel: good to see you. will: what'd you find out in graceland? >> it was absolutely incredible. i've never actually gone to graceland, and one of the things i was so struck with about elvis was what a big heart this i guy had. he bought graceland in his early 20s and moved in husband mother and his -- his mother and his friends. you find aha elvis was concerned about his career, what if i
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leave to go to the military, but he loved his country more than he loved his career. he's such a deep, interesting guy. it was quite a trip to go to memphis. pete: well, thankfully, you got to take cameras with you. let's take a look. ♪ ♪ >> hey, guys. your buddy john rich here, just pulled up to the home of great king of rock and roll, elvis presley. >> all of america will be talking about him -- >> a lot of country music takes its cues from the king of rock and roll. >> of course. >> this is my first time ever, my first trip. >> we are many elvis, the entertainer. there's over 20,000 square feet of everything elvis in here. >> the albums are from the door the to the ceiling. >> there's a few gold records. >> what was your role in actually making of the movie? >> trying to encapsulate
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everything elvis did in two and a half hours, i don't know how they did it. he actually came to memphis it was about four and a half years ago, and he lived here for almost a month. >> a 1956 gibson is an incredible trumpet, but the fact that this was elvis' guitar, did they actually allow guitar to be played in the movie? >> it was not actually used, a replica of it was. >> just a couple weeks ago when austin was in town, he did a rendition of i can't help falling in love. >> we're standing in front of one of the most iconic elvis get-ups that he ever put on, 1968 comeback special. >> here, in the movie it's such a pivotal part, such a perfectal part of elvis' career. ♪ ♪ >> so being the historian that you are, did you happen to notice my jacket? >> i do.
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it's from jailhouse to rock. exactly. >> it's incredible. >> there are over a hundred pieces of elvis' -- on display. >> wow, it's artwork. artwork. >> they really kid become pieces of art. and when elvis was wearing them on stage, they were just as much a part of the show. ♪ and we can --ment can't build our dreams on suspicious minds ♪♪ >> there's actually another outfit that, in my opinion, might be the most important thing ever. >> elvis presley givens his military service. >> here you have elvis, hollywood leading man, rock and roll star, he literally stopped his career for two years. e he loved his country, and that was important to him. >> these are actual uniforms? >> yes. the one that is really featured in the film is dress uniform. >> i've never met anyone like you. >> i hope not.
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>> if anyone deserves to have his own car showroom, it's elvis. >> without a doubt. >> he gave away over 200 cars throughout his lifetime. the majority of those cadillacs, of course. >> i wasn't fooling when i told those other kids i was going to buy them a cad hack one day. >> this car is also featured in the movie. ♪ ♪ >> john, i couldn't let you leave memphis without seeing the most important thing. >> yes. >> you have to see the mansion. >>? the mansion. >> really kind of something of a childhood promise to one day buy his parents a big house so they wouldn't have to or worry. >> make sure my mama and daddy never have to live in poverty again. >> one of my favorite things is this picture, elvis personal arely picked that out. and the unique thing, in the movie graceland is just as big of a character as elvis is
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because it represented so much to who elvis was as a man. they actually recreated graceland in australia. >> you'll never know what it's like to be elvis, but this is a little bit of it. knowing what it felt like to be elvis coming home. rachel: rich, i've been to graceland. you do feel like you get to know man a lot better, don't you? >> absolutely. i mean, what an incredible american icon. listen, his music impacts every artist whether you're country, rock and roll or otherwise. i don't think there was ever a more influential guy than i'll vis presley in the world of -- elvis presley. this movie is epic, what they put together. will: i've heard it's very good. john, that's a great tour of grace lamb. i've got to get there -- graceland. >> thanks, good to see you. pete: thank you, mama, always. [laughter] >> thank you, mama. will: there's a fox nation special on graceland right now,
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inside the gates of graceland. check that out. pete: all right. one more big hour next, mike huckabee joins us at the top of the hour. don't go anywhere, we've got a few surprises for you too. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ make way for the first-ever chevy silverado zr2. with multimatic shocks, rugged 33-inch tires, and front and rear electronic locking differentials. . . . ♪ ♪ this good? perfect. if you're gonna work remote... work remote. find new workspaces. find new roads. chevrolet.
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♪ ♪ oh, say can you see. ♪ by the dawn's early light. ♪ what so proudly we hailed. ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming. ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars. ♪ through the perilous fight. ♪ oer the ramparts we watched. ♪ were so gallantly streaming.
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♪ and the rocket's red glare. ♪ the bombs bursting in air. ♪ gave proof through the night. ♪ that our flag was still there. ♪ oh, say does that star spangled banner yet wave. ♪ oer the land of the free. ♪ and the home of the brave. [ applause ] rachel: wow. >> that is wonderful. rachel: that was awesome. that is john brennan, if you are a real world fan, if you're over the age of 40, basically and you know what the real world is, you know who john brennan is.
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he was on the real world in los angeles. he's a very dear friend of mine. he's going to be with us later in the show. we're going to talk with him. we're going to have a competition with him. by the way, he has a single out, called i ain't done singing yet, it's absolutely great. so thank you for that. also, it's great, this was the pro-life -- he would like it this way, by the way. he's also a minister. so that was a pro-life anthem because you saw that all those baby pictures are there. i requested that because i went to a pro life event and the women there said less pets, more babies and the producers delivered on a perfect weekend to do that. that was the pro life anthem. more babies and the flag, it's the kind of america you like. >> two for one today on the anthems. >> welcome to "fox & friends" on the fourth hour on a sunday. that's usually a 6:00 a.m. tradition. if you're not up early, the national anthem accompanied by
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your pictures is something we start every show with. today because john brennan is in town for rachel's daughter's wedding. rachel: he sang at the wedding. >> it was the perfect opportunity for him to come on the show today and serenade us at the 9:00 hour. >> congratulations again to the mother of the bride and the bride and the groom. it was a fantastic wedding. that's why you were out yesterday. rachel: yes. >> will and i, you know, soldiered forward with hangovers. rachel: i texted pete a story that i thought might be good for today's show and he's like -- i said at 7:30 a.m. and he said why are you not sleeping. >> i said why are you awake right now. rachel: 7:30, it's sleeping in for us. >> after the wedding, we slept for four to five hours. >> we went to the ceremony first where will and his wife were two rows in front of us and jen and i as and the kids
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shuffled in and if you didn't know will cain coming in, you would have thought he was superman because he was greeted with calls of superman because my son dubbed him as such because he looks like superman. i got home yesterday and my son wrote in this notebook, that says will cain, known as -- rachel: known as, i love it. >> superman. okay. even if his free time, will cain, known as superman, two pictures there. >> thank you so much for translating. i had no idea what that said. >> it's amazing. your biggest fan is 6 years old. he's watching right now. >> rex, love you, man. i've done nothing to deserve this title other than have my hair blow dried in the morning. i don't know why he thinks i'm superman. i p can't tell you how much i appreciate it. rachel: my cousin gave you this
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mug. she says you embodied superman. >> it works. rachel: we love you. >> thank you. >> congrats again. rachel: we begin with a fox news alert. protests and celebrations continuing across the country following the supreme court's amazing reversal of roe versus wade. several hundred people were out in washington for a second straight day yesterday, two arrested there. but the scene remained mostly calm with a heavy police presence. >> in colorado, a pregnancy center was vandalized and set on fire including a tag that said if abortions aren't safe, neither are you. in oregon, ten people were arrested for disorderly conduct. police saying a crowd zeroed in on a crisis pregnancy center. >> and protesters in arizona a tried breaking into the state's senate friday, sounds pretty insurrectiony to me, then reportedly tried taking down protective fencing when they returned last night. let's bring in mike huckabee,
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former governor of arkansas, to comment on this. governor, we read a bunch of headlines about how the left is losing their mind about roe v wade and this is no surprise but there are also millions and tens of millions of households in america on bended knee, grateful for the fact that 50 years later roe v wade is gone. this is a celebratory moment. >> 53 million babies we lost, basically, think about that, that's a fifth of our population that we have lost since 1973, babies to abortion. i don't know why people still defend the idea of abortion on demand when you think about the fact that it's the only medical procedure that i'm aware of in which at least one of the two people involved is absolutely certain to die. and we continue to call it healthcare. there's nothing that is about healthcare when it comes to taking the life of an unborn child. by the way, i do want to just mention how grateful i am to be
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on with the mother of the bride, but more importantly to be on with superman. i mean, how cool is that? >> right. i'm proud of you, governor. i'm happy for you too. [laughter] i'm glad you got to see me this morning. [laughter] governor, thank you for that. we love having you on, on sundays, in big moments like this to put in perspective. it's not just a moral question, it's also a legal question, one that goes back to the states and numerous states, dozens of states have acted with trigger laws, arkansas among them in the wake of the supreme court's decision. what do you expect to see across the country? >> i think there's going to be a mix of reactions. some states will have more abortions, new york and california, most likely. but other states like arkansas and the states that surround us, you will see no aabortions. the clinics have been told, the planned parenthood profit centers, which is what they r it's a business and they've been
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told to cease and desist, to no longer perform abortions. i think that's a wonderful thing. i'm proud that arkansas is one of the states that affirmed life. now, what will happen is that we'll go back to the way it should have been all along and that is that the people through their elected representatives will determine the level of abortion in each of the 50 states. so if people really believe that abortion is popular and you hear the pro abortion people saying but people want abortions, then, fine, go to your legislators, convince them of that. they will pass it into law in your state and you'll have all the abortions that you can convince the legislators to create but for those of us who live in states where the majority say, you know, there's just something that hideous about this, just taking the life of an unborn child because it's inconvenient or it's expensive, my gosh, when we start that, where does this end? when people get old? do we end their lives because they're expensive. do we end their lives because it
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represents an a inconvenience to see them in the long-term care center. i mean, i don't think we want to live in that kind of culture. i don't. i want to live in a culture that affirms life and values every single human being and where we believe that the captain of the football team is no more val wall than the child with down's syndrome, that both created, loved and honored by god and therefore should be honored and loved by us too. rachel: oh, gosh, that was so beautifully said and touches my heart as a mother of a child with special needs, i don't love her any less than any of the other ones and it's so interesting because we just saw this weekend anna novaro a cnn contributor, she appears regularly on "the view" outwardly saying what we know to be true that the you'd jen ex mentality of -- eugenics mentality of planned parented p.
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they're profit centers. you can call them butcher shops if you like. i want to play a clip of an interview that pete had earlier with an abortion survivor and a wonderful man who was conceived through rape and is grateful to be alive and his mother chose life and adoption. take a look at this. i'd like to get your reaction on the other side. >> i thank god that i'm now able to actually prove that triumph can rise from tragedy all the time. i'm literally that 1% that's used 100% of the time to justify abortion but i thank god that my parents, two of the most pro life people ever known, shattered the myth of an unwanted child. >> i'm the product of my birth mom's right to choose whether to have me or not. i feel an absolute blessing to be able to live this life and be part of this world. there's lots of women out there who have a choice, have people speaking for them. we see it everywhere and being that i did survive an abortion,
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someone has got to speak for those little lives that aren't being spoken for. rachel: governor, your reaction? >> it's just beautiful. and i know ryan bomberger he's an amazing human being, so articulate, so positive and uplifting. i've interviewed him before. i find him to be one of those people that is the greatest advocate for life because he speaks from a position of authority. he doesn't speak from just a philosophical point of view. but as a person who could easily have been one of those statistics that most people say, well, now, that's a legitimate reason to you abort a child -- to abort a child. i'm kind of glad he's around. he's a great guy, a great father and a husband and i think we would be missing something if we didn't know ryan and that's what i wish people could see. is that there's no such thing as a person without worth, a person without value.
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every human life has intrinsic worth and value. every person brings something to the world. and when we lose them, when we don't even get to know them, we don't know what we've missed. god gave us that life and i don't know that i want to face him one day and say, you know, we just decided that that particular life had no value. we did not see it. -- did not see itsworth so we e. >> we're glad you're around, governor. so well put this morning. >> by the way, governor, happy you got to appear with superman, the mother of the bride, captain america. rachel: sean consistently. connery.>> he is morphing intoe clooney. that beard, it's a wonder. rachel: i've told the governor it was very sexy, he thanked me for that. he remembered that very well and you do look like a sean connery to me, not george clooney.
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>> that's better than saying -- what's going on with joe biden's economy, i'll probably have to moon light as a department store santa this year so i'm getting a head start. >> good to talk with you this morning. rachel: sexy santa. [laughter] >> she's not letting it go. she's not letting it go. >> just one adjective. congratulations. >> oh, my goodness. >> we're talking about this this morning, it's a big story out of arizona, sometimes getting buried underneath the massive news from the supreme court. arizona embraced school vouchers, freedom of choice when it comes to education to the extent that not many have -- no states have to this point really in american history. $7,000 vouchers offered to every student in arizona. every single student, every parent now has an option and ability to choose the school of their choice. public, private, secular, religious. it's your choice how you want your child educated.
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it's flown under the radar because there's been a lot of wonderful big news in the last couple days emanating from the supreme court. rachel, you did a great interview with corey deangeles, the american federation for children, explaining why this is such a big education victory in arizona. >> this is clearly the biggest victory when it comes to school of choice in u.s. history, every family regardless of income will be able to take their kids' state funded education dollars to the education provider of their choosing, whether public, private or home based educational option. this is the way that every state should do it and they should follow governor doug ducey's lead and the republicans in the state legislature and senate and house of arizona. republicans have been saying there's a parent party. republicans in arizona just proved it. rachel: this is truly historic. i believe it's the beginning of a trend. i think two take-aways from this, i don't think this would have happened had we not seen or
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had the unions not exposed who they are, whose side they are on and all the corruption that we saw over the last several years with the pandemic. so unions, you did this and now i think many other states are going to follow. the second take-away is that this is about fairness. barack obama, michelle obama, have been opponents of school choice for so long and yet when given the choice themselves, they always chose private schools for their own children. same with the clintons, same with so many of these people who claim that they're on the side of parents and they're on the side of kids. then have a choice, they choose a private school or a school that's right for their kids. they're allowed to have that choice. now arizona is saying everybody has that choice and i think this is a game changer. will: one last addition to take away here. the founding fathers conceived this country as little laboratories of democracy, each state experimenting with the way that we should be governed.
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i think we've seen real victories in the past week of moving towards what is freedom on a local level, whether or not it comes from the issue of abortion, school of choice, increasingly we're seeing calls for the states to take over immigration, democracy willing to solve where they can some of the greatest issues. >> we've seen for republican politicians, ron de santis, glenn youngkin, good policy also equals good politics. when parents see this works in arizona they'll ask for more of it. republicans who tiptoed around vouchers and school of choice have an opportunity to go all in and be rewarded by the electorate. rachel: states like wisconsin that had vouchers and were doing it early on, they limit it to low income. this makes a huge statement, says, no, these are your tax dollars, these are your children, the money is attached to your child. you make the best choice because
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i trust you as a parent. >> that's one of the things in my new book, battle for the american mind, we talk about in the educational insurgency is universal educational choice to break down the monopoly of the unions inside government schools. if you haven't picked up a copy, you still can. you can come out and hear myself and david goodwin, my co-author, we'll be at the ronald reagan presidential lie -- library this tuesday. go to the website, all the information is there. or if you're looking for a signed copy, we have not had any available yet and now we do. you can go to that url right there, premiercollectibling.com/battle and purchase a signed copy. we're doing a live signing, get a signed copy of battle for the american mind. rachel: i hope people go and i hope people buy the book. if you're a politician, this is
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number one on the new york times best seller for a reason. there is a demand. there is a hunger for your book, for the information in your book and for the solutions that you provide. >> we deserve it. >> go see pete in california, pick up a signed copy or pick up a copy of the number one new york times best seller. rachel: or just pick up pete. >> sure, why not. we'll see you in california. >> thank you, will. as the left fumes over the supreme court ruling on roe, the justices are set to make yet another major decision tomorrow. rachel: the high school football coach fired for praying on the field joins us to discuss his fight for faith, next. before discovering nexium 24hr to treat her frequent heartburn... claire could only imagine enjoying chocolate cake. now, she can have her cake and eat it too. nexium 24hr stops acid before it starts for all-day, all-night protection. can you imagine 24 hours without heartburn?
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>> as backlash grows over two supreme court decisions, some backlash, a lot of celebration as well, a high school football coach is awaiting to hear the verdict on his religious liberty case which could come as soon as tomorrow. coach joe kennedy was fired for praying on the 50-yard line after a football game. he joins us along with first liberty institute executive general counsel, hir am. coach, to you, first today is
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sunday, tomorrow is monday, the last day of the supreme court calendar. it may not happen tomorrow but likely it will. all you wanted was the opportunity to quietly pray at the 50-yard line after games. the highest court in the land is about to rule on your case. what are you thinking? >> it is so bizarre to me, something so simple as taking a knee for 15 seconds in thanks after a football game has made this much noise, all the way to the supreme court. it seems just weird to me. >> hiram, the case is there, presumably the outcome is already written. can you give us a sense of what you're anticipating. this court has shown a lot of support for religious freedom and religious expression. what's your expectation? >> we're hopeful that the coach will be able to win. we asked for something pretty small, which is just that coach should be able to pray quietly by himself after the games and
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so if we can win that, that would be fantastic and get coach back out on the field for this coming season. >> what other impacts, real quick, could this case have? yes, this is a case about one coach and one particular form of expression but could it lead to opportunities for faith in the public square in other ways? well, sure. i mean, depending how it's written. this could provide broad protection for not just public school employees, but public employees at large. it could affect millions of americans and their right to be able to share their faith in private settings or just simply to be able to just pray over their meals at lunchtime without being discriminated against. >> and considering how the court ruled on roe, which could have been narrow, but ultimately overruled, this court has shown a willingness to go bigger as well. coach, your story has captivated the nation to include outlets like sports i'll traited -- i'll
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illustrated. they said a win for kennedy, that's you, and an erosion of a bed rock of american democracy. how would what you're doing be an erosion of democracy? >> i do not understand that in the slightest bit. you know, i spent 20 years in the marine corps fighting to protect the constitution and i think i'm still doing it right now. so if sports illustrated or they want to meet in the octagon and have a fair fight, i'm all in. they can write whatever they want about anything else. >> coach, i'll tell you this. you have -- it's been amazing what you withstood and you took it all the way to the top and you've got 24 hours or less to find out where. we're all pulling for you. thanks so much. we'll be looking for the case tomorrow. god bless you both. >> awesome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> one-time liberal darling, andrew yang, says the democrats only have themselves to blame
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for the roe v wade reversal. raymond oroyo on andrew yang's blistering takedown of his own party, that's next. n - we will ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ the new gmc sierra. premium and capable. that's professional grade. it■s hard eating healthy. unless you happen to be a dog. hi, i'm karen. i lost 58 pounds on golo and i've kept it off for over a year.
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rachel: we are back with headlines starting with this. pga tour golfer is disqualified for failing to finish his round. on the 18th hole, he hit his final shot of the day, 40 yards past the green before leaving the course. the three time pga tour winner was going to miss the cut anyway but there was speculation that he is set to join live golf. >> he said i'm done. i'm out. i'm going to the live. rachel: history is made at the 2022 world swimming
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championship, performing the fastest time since 2018. she has won the 800-meter free style race eight consecutive times, the 25-year-old athlete has 23 medals including seven olympic gold medals, the most of any female swimmer in the world. i said female swimmer. >> the fastest woman of all time. rachel: she's a woman. those are your headlines. >> have you tried to swim for eight minutes really fast. rachel: i can't do it. she's amazing. all right. will, what do you have? will: failed democratic presidential candidate andrew yang blaming his party for the reversal of roe v wade. he writes it feels like democrats owe their people an apology. they had a long time to defend roe v wade or get rbg to step down, et cetera. instead, they got played and trounced. help undo our failures is not a compelling rallying cry.
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raymond arroyo is here to react. glad to see you this morning. what do you think of andrew yang's statement? >> i think it misses the point here, will. it's a little off base. look, how many layers of fantasy land is andrew yang going to enter into, to try to reconstruct what happened at the court this week. hillary might have been elected. they may have had majority, rbg might have been living, there's a ton of things that might have happened but they didn't. here is what andrew yang, and i think a lot of people, they're just in denial today, the fact is this was an inevitable decision by the supreme court on roe. first of all, because it was an invented constitutional right and very bad law. i heard rbg herself say that and many constitutional scholars. that was the primary reason that this ruling followed. the other reason, and it's not often noted, if this was not a partisan movement that hastened
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this decision, this was a deliberate 49-year march of people united in this cause for life, a prayerful movement of democrats, republican, independents and they raised this issue of life and the wrongness of the roe decision, the cram-down of roe and they prevailed. >>s there's several seminal moments that led to this decision. you highlighted one that not many pointed to. amy he coney barrett relayses ruth bader ginsburg, the advancement of science that leads to the inability to sustain life. really quickly, raymond, i want to get your reaction to the fact that nancy pelosi and democrats are raising funds off the decision. the fund raising e-mails are out. >> well, here's the problem. they say they're going to codify roe v wade, like trying to
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codify plesy at this point, separate but equal. the supreme court defines rights as you well know, will. all congress can do is enforce them and i think even if pelosi could get the votes which we're not sure of and here she is pledging by the way to make republicans regret ever challenging the choice for abortion, right to choose. i don't think this is going to work. codifying roe won't work either. the court's going to strike it down and what pelosi will learn is that it is the court that define these rights and not politicians' fund raising letters. we will see in the days ahead. i doubt if she has the votes. if she does, i don't think it will stand. you can't create a constitutional right with congress. it doesn't work the that way. sorry, constitution's not silly puddy. >> raymond arroyo, great perspective. thank you, raymond. disney goes woke again. maria bartiromo on that story, coming up.
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as leaders of the g7 came to the bavarian alps to meet for the three day summit. they have been very vocal about even before coming here that russia would be a central focus over the three days. president biden did not give a large comment on this but he did say a few quick words. take a listen. >> mr. president, do you have a reaction to the russian missile strike in kiev? >> [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: earlier in the morning, biden met with german chancellor praising the alliance and response to the kremlin. this time they are banning imports of gold from russia, the g7 will officially announce the news on tuesday. this weekend's summit at a private castle outside of munich, germany will largely center on the invasion, the war on european soil triggered instability not just across the continent but really around the
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world. last year the major concern at the meeting was the pandemic. but now china will be a broad theme for the trip. they're also focusing on inflation, the current energy crisis, supply chain blocks, food shortages and climate change. the leaders of the u.s., u.k., canada, france, italy, germany, and japan have met as a group and in some cases will meet each other individually for talks as well as a dinner tonight. they are not the only people who have traveled here from the parts of -- other parts of the world to the bavarian alps. other leaders include the leader of argentina, india, senegal, indonesia and south africa. ukraine's president will not be here but he will address the summit virtually. pete: alex hogan, thank you very much. let's turn now to chief meteorologist rick reichmuth for our fox weather forecast. hey, rick. >> good morning, pete. it's a warm day across the eastern seaboard after the heat that's been bottled up for the
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last 10 days, it's moving to the east. take a look at what happened. across the central plains, the blues, the temps are 20 to 30-degree below average temperatures for this time of year after we broke hundreds of high temperature records over the last couple weeks. a bit of a break, it's going to last for a couple days and then we'll start to see things heat up again. take a look at this, 57 in fargo, 68 in kansas city, 73 in chicago. enjoy the cooler temperatures. it's behind this front that we see bringing the rain stretching across the central part of the country right now. we'll see more rain across areas of florida and the gulf and take a look at the moisture around the four core percent, that is early -- corners, that's early monsoon moisture. rachel: american corporations are facing backlash as they vow to cover all costs for employees crossing state lines for abortions. one outraged disney employee telling the new york post, this
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is another attempt by disney to take a political stance that will inevitably alienate potential customers. the activism hurt the company financially and is violating the fiduciary duty to shareholders by continuing to comment on political matters many here to react, sunday morning futures anchor maria bartiromo. maria, good morning. it's such an interesting quote from this employee because i'm a customer of disney and i don't know if i would want mickey mouse and cinderella associated with abortion. why are they doing this? maria: yeah, you're so right, rachel. good morning to u it's great to see you. and congratulations to your daughter. rachel: thank you. maria: who got married. i loved seeing you. look, i think at this point companies are being much more cautious than ever before in terms of wading into political issues. i was surprised to see so many companies step up and say we will pay for an abortion if you have to travel but that's what we're seeing right now because
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there is such pushback from half the country on this decision and i think, you know, we'll have to see how this plays out in terms of what happens to these companies. we remember what happened after they took the major league baseball game and moved it because of political issues and then we realized that the georgia vote was totally wrong and they were running and defending something that wasn't even true. so, look, i think companies have gotten burned by this in the past, getting involved in political issues and i don't think you're going to see that much of a ground swell of companies getting involved but to see disney do it, i agree, is totally -- it feels almost hypocritical, given it is a children's company. it's odd to see. i don't think you're going to see a huge amount of companies do it but over the weekend there have been people saying that they want to step up to fill the
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hole that some people feel was left with this decision. we'll see. rachel: tell me about what's coming up on your show because we know you have -- maria: we're leading the show with mark levin. he's going to talk about the ruling and what it means and how this will play out longer term as far as the states that are stepping up to say, look, we are going to make as much -- we're going to come across as much as possible for women and then there are other states that are just banning abortion all together. we're talking with john solomon and jim jordan about breaking news on the violence that has come in this. nancy pelosi trying to turn this into a vote saying it's on the ballot in november. monica de la cruz is part of a growing hispanic movement toward the gop. she is going to join us. of course senator bill haggerty
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on policy and what is coming in the coming weeks as the democrats continue to push through more spending even in the face of this inflation. we'll see you in 15 minutes. we have breaking news. rachel: looks like a great show. looking forward to seeing the monica de la cruz interview. democrats thinking abortion might hurt them with hispanic women in particular. so great show. we'll be tuned. maria: we'll see you in a few minutes. rachel: thanks, maria. the usfl title games is one week from today so who will come out on top? the stars or the stallions? abby hornbeck is standing by with a couple of the top players. stick around, stay with us. ♪ the tempur-pedic breeze° makes sleep...feel cool. because the tempur-breeze° transfers heat away from your body... ...so you feel cool, night after night. for a limited time, save $500 on all tempur-breeze°™ mattresses.
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>> the philadelphia stars shining yesterday as they stunned the new jersey generalses advancing to the championship game with a 19-14 win. >> the birmingham stallions continued their wining streak, beating the new orleans breakers to face the stars in the league finals. rachel: let's head to cleveland where abby hornacek is live with players from each title contender, we start with the quarterback and wide receiver,
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victor golden junior. abby. >> reporter: yeah, that's right, you guys. you know, we had both winning head coaches last hour. now i have two of the players who absolutely dominated in yesterday's games. you guys, thank you so much for coming on this morning with me. congrats on the win. >> thank you. >> reporter: we'll start with you. such an incredible story, you didn't begin the season as the starter. after coming in, in game four, you absolutely dominated just like i said in my intro. can you talk about your mindset throughout the season, that led you to be fourth in passing yards and second in touchdown passes? >> yeah, i think for me it's really simple. just getting on the same page with the guys. we have a lot of very athletic play makers and so my job as quarterback is to get them the ball. so wide receiver, running back, tighteneds, we feel positions can make plays for us. i try to get the ball to them as quickly as i can. >> reporter: victor, you made
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the usfl all-star twice, first as a receiver, second as a special teamer. can you talk about how you continued to fill that role and perform for your team? >> yeah, we came in, knowing that i would have an opportunity to return kicks and play receiver and just to get the opportunity to go out there and do that, i think that our success came from our consistency. so just have to continue to do what i'm doing and make a plays for my team. >> reporter: you face off in week five. heading into the championship game, what are you thinking. >> we're excited to be there. but got to watch a lot of film first off. we haven't played each other in a few weeks because we've been so focused on going 1-0 each week. they're a good football team. we like our matchup. we're excited about the game. >> big honor to play in the game. this is was we talked about since the beginning to get here. we're excited for the opportunity and we're going to prepare like we do every week and take advantage of it.
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>> reporter: victor, case, thank you so much for coming on. good luck next week. you can catch it on july 3rd on fox. >> abby, thank you. the philadelphia stars face off against the birmingham stallions on fox. rachel: at 7:30 p.m. tonight. all right. still ahead, as they famously say, come on, baby, shake that -- do that what? we're going to go -- do you remember what it is? >> no. rachel: conga. we're going to see who can finish the lyrics of famous songs. that's the contest, with john brennan from real world los angeles. stay with us. ♪ before treating your chronic migraine— 15 or more headache days a month, each lasting 4 hours or more you're not the only one with questions about botox®. botox® prevents headaches in adults with chronic migraine
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♪ ♪ make way for the first-ever chevy silverado zr2. with multimatic shocks, rugged 33-inch tires, and front and rear electronic locking differentials. dude, this is awesome... but we should get back to work. ♪ ♪ this good? perfect. if you're gonna work remote... work remote. find new workspaces. find new roads. chevrolet. ♪ muck. [laughter] will: -- of the national anthem at the top of the hour, ain't
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done with "fox & friends" yet. rachel: that's the name of this new title hit, let's bring back our friend, country artist john brennan to see who can remember the lyrics to the most hit sock. will: if we're doing country, i'm going to win, john. [laughter] rachel: by the way, just so you know, rick reichmuth is a real world fan. rick: only when you were on, because that's how old i am. and you were a kid. >> he was on before me. okay. ♪ we were trying different things, we were smoking funny hinges -- ♪ making love out by the headache to our favorite song -- lake to our favorite song. will: i got it. not thinking about tomorrow singing sweet home alabamaal all summer long. rick: you sing all the lyrics all the way through.
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♪ you gotta be bad, you gotta be bold -- ♪ you gotta be wiser, you gotta be hard -- ♪ you gotta be cool, you gotta be calm, you gotta stay togethe- ♪ love will save the day. >> love will say the cay. [inaudible conversations] rick: all right, two for pete. pete: you are trailing me. rick: he got every word. >> pretty sure i won the first one. ♪ ♪ will: always easy raising my father's son. pete: okay. rachel: he got the lyrics. [laughter] rick: not quite -- will: it wasn't in the right
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place though -- rick: you can't give -- [inaudible conversations] >> play some alan jackson. pete: next one. ♪ you drive me crazy, i just can't sleep. ♪ i'm so excited, i'm in too deep. ♪ you call me crazy -- [laughter] will: yeah. [inaudible conversations] rachel: you don't know britney, john? no, no, no, listen, nobody is a bigger britney fan, i think britney instagram. [laughter] rick: it's a rain wreck. all right, one haas thing. ♪ -- emotion that i get from you. ♪ you got the kind of loving that can be so smooth, yeah -- ♪ give me your heart, make it real or let's forget about it.
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>> no, no, i gotta that one. for sure, that was me. rick: listen, i hate to say this, but with pete! will: a lot of radio. john, thank you very much. if. rachel: john's album is i ain't done singing yet, available on john brennan.com. ♪ ♪ maria: good sunday morning, everyone. welcome to "sunday morning futures, "i'm maria bartiromo. today, chaos and choice. pro-abortion groups lash out destroying property all weekend as the democrat leadership blows off the constitution and undermines the supreme court. >> the supreme court has made some terrible decisions. >> the extremist maga supreme court. >> you see this turnout here? you ain't seen nothing yet. no matter how they

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