Skip to main content

tv   ABC World News Tonight With David Muir  ABC  April 14, 2021 5:30pm-6:00pm PDT

5:30 pm
tonight, breaking news as we come on the air on the johnson & johnson vaccine. late today, a cdc panel of experts leaving the temporary pause in place, saying they need more data. after reports of six women suffering rare blood clots after receiving the shot. one death, one woman in the hospital. the pause affecting thousands of vaccination sites. 1 in 4 locations in the u.s. using that vaccine. and what the head of the white house task force said today about the pfizer and moderna vaccines. also tonight, the former police officer kim potter has now been charged with second degree manslaughter for the deadly shooting of 20-year-old daunte wright. potter allegedly mistaking her gun for her taser. the 26-year veteran was training another officer as this all unfolded. the trial of former police
5:31 pm
officer derek chauvin tonight. a former chief medical examiner testifying for the defense suggesting underlying health issues were the cause of george floyd's death. news on u.s. troops in afghanistan tonight. president biden revealing today his plans to end america's longest war, withdrawing u.s. troops from afghanistan by september 11th, the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. and what the cia director said just today about the risk if u.s. troops leave. the desperate search under way at this hour to find survivors from a capsized vessel in the gulf. at least one person found dead. several others still missing tonight. the attack on the capitol. and the scathing new report tonight from the inspector general. did capitol police ignore intelligence warnings of an attack on congress? and why were officers told not to use the most aggressive force against the capitol rioters? bernie madoff has died in prison. so whatever happened to the billions stolen?
5:32 pm
did american investors get their money back? and the new cdc study tonight on the virus, airplanes, and the middle seat. good evening. it's great to have you with us here on a wednesday night. we begin with the breaking headline from the cdc, an advisory committee late today leaving the temporary pause for the johnson & johnson vaccine in effect. saying they simply need to know more after those extremely rare reports of six women who suffered severe blood clots. one died, another in the hospital. this temporary halt affecting about 1 in 4 vaccine sites in the country giving the johnson & johnson one-shot vaccine. the panel adjourning without a clear recommendation, saying they'll try to meet again in a week to ten days. the johnson & johnson vaccine
5:33 pm
using similar technology to the astrazeneca vaccine in europe. that vaccine has also triggered some concern in europe over rare blood clots there. at least 19 reported deaths. and the white house saying there's more than enough of the other vaccines to vaccinate all americans. to even accelerate vaccinations, they suggested. steve osunsami leading us off tonight with late news from the cdc in atlanta. >> reporter: a cdc advisory panel tonight says it needs more time and information to respond to the new concerns about the johnson & johnson vaccine. which means for now, americans should continue holding off using this brand of the covid vaccine. >> we do not have to arrive at a vote today or a recommendation today. if we need more time to think about this, we can reconvene later this week or this weekend. >> reporter: a very small number of women who suffered blood clots after getting the shot caused health officials to put a hold on using the drug.
5:34 pm
health officials here worry that this potential adverse reaction looks a little too similar to what happened in europe with the astrazeneca vaccine. the astrazeneca vaccine is made using similar technology as the johnson & johnson, and in europe 19 people died. >> there are some rather strong similarities about this with regard to the time frame following vaccination. particularly importantly, the clinical syndrome of these clots together with low platelets. so there are a lot of similarities there that you just can't miss that. >> reporter: the scientists are looking for any link between the six women who got sick, and they're investigating whether the blood clots were an immune response. all six women were between 18 and 48 years old. they got sick within two weeks of getting vaccinated. some of the clots formed in veins of the sinus and prevented blood from draining out of the brain. one woman died. three are still hospitalized. the holdup on using the johnson
5:35 pm
& johnson vaccine has had a huge impact on these 7,000 locations where it was the only shot they were giving. 1 out of every 4 vaccine locations in america was only using johnson & johnson. >> i get why they're doing it, out of the abundance of caution. but the statistics were so low for someone like myself to get the blood clotting, i was willing to take the risk anyway. >> reporter: the race is on to find available shots from pfizer and moderna for appointments that are already scheduled. >> this is all the pfizer and all the johnson i have. of course it makes it very hard because i have hundreds of doses of johnson that i can't use. >> reporter: they're pretty frustrated at this clinic in los angeles that's already been struggling to vaccinate underserved communities. toight, the biden administration is saying that p vaccine. >> i want to be clear that we have more than enough pfizer and moderna vaccine supply to continue or even accelerate the current pace of vaccinations. >> all right. steve osunsami live at the cdc
5:36 pm
tonight. i know the advisory committee plans to meet again on this. any idea how soon? >> reporter: david, this group's next meeting is scheduled for may 5th. but they're hoping to meet again in a week or so. there was a lot of concern about making a decision without all the proper information. they're also still watching about 3 million americans who have recently gotten the johnson & johnson vaccine within the last few weeks. they say it's still very possible we could see a few more of these rare cases that concern them. david? >> steve, thank you. the other major story developing, the former officer in the shooting death of 20-year-old daunte wright has now been charged with second degree manslaughter. kim potter was training another officer when this unfolded. body camera video can be heard, her shouting taser then firing her gun instead. stephanie ramos in minnesota again tonight. >> reporter: tonight, the now
5:37 pm
former officer who killed daunte wright charged with second degree manslaughter days after this traffic stop. >> [ bleep ]. i just shot him. >> reporter: according to the washington county attorney's office, kim potter fired one round into wright's left side with her glock 9-millimeter handgun after yelling, "taser, taser, taser." you can see a yellow taser on her belt in this photo. the office adding in a statement, "certain occupations carry an immense responsibility, and none more so than a sworn police officer." today, the wright family's lawyer questioning how potter, a brooklyn center police veteran, appeared to have mixed up the two. >> at what point did you not feel that this was a gun in your hand, versus a taser? and so the family, obviously, they are glad she got charged. >> reporter: authorities say potter, on the force for 26 years, was actually training another officer sunday when wright was pulled over for an expired tag. as they tried to arrest the unarmed 20-year-old for an outstanding warrant, a struggle broke out. >> i'll tase you!
5:38 pm
>> reporter: moments later, potter firing that fatal shot. she resigned along with the police chief. for a third night in a row, protesters taking to the streets, outraged over the killing of the young father. the mother of his child remembering him. >> he was a good father. he loved his son, and he wanted to see him grow up. he just was a very active fther. >> reporter: potter was brought to this hennepin county jail. if convicted, she could face up to ten years in prison. but if the case goes to a jury, she could also be acquitted. david? >> stephanie, thank you. and just a few miles from that scene, the trial of former police officer derek chauvin in the death of george floyd. today, the defense calling a former chief medical examiner who testified that underlying health issues were the cause of floyd's death. here's alex perez. >> reporter: today, the defense calling a forensic pathologist who testified that the manner of george floyd's death, officially
5:39 pm
classified as a homicide, was actually undetermined, citing a series of potential causes including heart disease and drug use. >> how did the heart and drugs contribute to the cause of death? >> they were significant. >> reporter: the defense also floating a new theory that floyd inhaled carbon monoxide from the tailpipe of the squad car. >> there is exposure to a vehicle exhaust, so potentially carbon monoxide poisoning. >> reporter: prosecutors then demanding proof, and the witness admitting he had none. >> you haven't seen any data or test results that showed mr. floyd had a single injury from carbon monoxide. is that true? >> that is correct, because it was never sent to the laboratory for that test. >> i just simply asked you whether -- i asked you whether it was true, sir. yes or no? >> it is true. >> reporter: dr. david fowler conceding the officers should have tried to help floyd when he became non-responsive. >> are you critical of the fact
5:40 pm
that he wasn't given immediate emergency care when he went into cardiac arrest? >> yeah. as a physician, i would agree. >> reporter: david, we expect the defense will rest their case tomorrow. so far, they've called seven witnesses. the prosecution called 38 witnesses. we could learn soon who was more effective as early as next week, when the jury gets the case. david? >> alex, thank you. we turn now to news on u.s. troops in afghanistan. president biden revealing his plan for all u.s. troops to leave afghanistan by september 11th. the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. and what the cia director said just today about the risk if u.s. troops leave. here's mary bruce tonight. >> reporter: at arlington cemetery tonight, president biden honoring the lives lost as he announced he's ending the 20-year war in afghanistan, withdrawing all u.s. troops by this september 11th. >> it's time to end america's longest war. >> reporter: over the last two
5:41 pm
decades, 2,312 americans were killed. more than 20,000 wounded. and nearly $825 billion were spent. >> we delivered justice to bin laden a decade ago, and we have stayed in afghanistan for a decade since. since then, our reasons for remaining in afghanistan become increasingly unclear. >> reporter: on capitol hill today, the head of the cia with a sobering assessment. >> when the time comes for the u.s. military to withdraw, the u.s. government's ability to collect and act on threats will diminish. that is simply a fact. >> reporter: but he also said al qaeda, the group behind 9/11, does not have the capacity today to carry out an attack against the u.s. >> mary with us live from the white house. we noted while we were on the air that the president was speaking today from the treaty room, the same room where president george w. bush told the nation nearly 20 years ago that we were in afghanistan.
5:42 pm
now, 20 years later, president biden saying we must end this forever war. president biden saying he spoke with former president bush? >> reporter: yes, he says he spoke with bush yesterday to inform him of his decision. he did not say how the former president responded. but biden stressed they're absolutely united in their respect and support for the valor and courage of the men and women who served. >> mary, thank you. and also from washington tonight, a scathing new report on the attack on the capitol. what the inspector general has found. did capitol police ignore intelligence warnings that congress itself was the target? here's pierre thomas. >> reporter: tonight, a new inspector general report revealing just three days before the attack, capitol police intelligence analysts wrote that congress itself is the target, and that the stop the steal movement had the likelihood of attracting white supremacists, militia members, and others who actively promote violence.
5:43 pm
today, the intelligence failure drawing sharp criticism from the senator who chairs the committee overseeing the capitol police. >> in the end, they didn't do what they needed to do. >> reporter: the inspector general's findings, in sharp contrast to former capitol security officials who recently told congress they could not have anticipated the broad violence that left more than 100 officers injured and possibly killed another. >> no entity, including the fbi, provided any new intelligence regarding january 6th. >> reporter: the inspector general also finding stunning security failures the day of the insurrection. shields that easily shattered from the blows from the mob, some officers vulnerable without shields because they were locked away inside of a bus. and the inspector general questioning why officers were also told not to use the most aggressive force against the mob, like stun grenades, which might have helped push back the rioters. david, tonight we learned that prosecutors have closed the investigation into the fatal shooting of ashli babbitt.
5:44 pm
who was killed by capitol police when she tried to climb through a broken window during the attack. authorities say the officer was justified to fire in self defense, and to defense congress. david? >> pierre, thank you. there's a desperate search under way in the gulf of mexico tonight after a vessel capsized. at least one person found dead. 12 crew members still missing off the coast of louisiana. elwyn lopez is in louisiana tonight. >> reporter: tonight, off the louisiana coast, a race against time to find survivors from this capsized vessel. >> we are saturating the area with available resources to assist in the rescue mission. >> reporter: 19 people were on board the seacor power when it capsized during unusually powerful storms. the 129-foot vessel has 250-foot legs that can raise it out of the water to work on offshore platforms. winds gusting to 75 miles per hour in the area.
5:45 pm
a good samaritan sending a distress message just before 4:30 p.m. the coast guard and good samaritans saving six people from the rough seas, finding one survive.rson who did not - families of the missing anxiously awaiting word tonight. >> we're trying to be positive and stand on faith. >> reporter: the coast guard telling me moments ago, efforts to find those missing will continue throughout the night here. david? >> elwyn, thank you. we learned today that bernie madoff has died in prison. he was 82. the mastermind of the biggest ponzi scheme in american history. and we wondered, whatever happened to the billions? did investors get their money back? here's whit johnson tonight. >> reporter: the mastermind of the largest ponzi scheme in american history, dying behind bars in north carolina at the age of 82. bernie madoff's health deteriorating in recent months. in a wheelchair, suffering from
5:46 pm
kidney disease. >> he was an aging, debilitated man who was in many ways broken at this point in his life. >> reporter: madoff died 12 years into a 150-year sentence. the disgraced financier defrauding thousands of investors. pleading guilty to the scheme, which unraveled shortly after the 2008 financial crisis. >> he's not only destroyed my life but he's destroyed the lives of thousands of people. >> reporter: madoff's wife ruth madoff, reportedly living quietly out of the public eye in connecticut and florida, always claimed she knew nothing. the fraud was ultimately valued at $17.5 billion. most of that, more than $14 billion, has now been recovered for the victims. david? >> whit, thank you. when we come back, the new cdc study on the virus, airplanes, and the middle seat.
5:47 pm
saturdays happen. pain happens. aleve it. aleve is proven stronger and longer on pain than tylenol. when pain happens, aleve it. all day strong. ♪ ♪ ocean spray works with nature every day to keep you healthy with less moderate-to-severe eczema, you can roll up those sleeves.
5:48 pm
with dupixent, adults saw clearer skin and significantly less itch. don't use if you're allergic to dupixent. serious allergic reactions can occur including anaphylaxis, which is severe. tell your doctor about new or worsening eye problems, such as eye pain or vision changes, or a parasitic infection. if you take asthma medicines, don't change or stop them without talking to your doctor. so help heal your skin from within and talk to your eczema specialist about dupixent. if you wake up thinking about the market and want to make the right moves fast... get decision tech from fidelity. [ cellphone vibrates ] you'll get proactive alerts for market events before they happen... and insights on every buy and sell decision. with zero-commission online u.s. stock and etf trades. for smarter trading decisions, get decision tech from fidelity. tonight, prosecutors
5:49 pm
revealing more about a break in the case in the disappearance of kristin smart nearly 25 years ago. authorities charging paul flores with murder, saying he killed smart during an attempted sex assault. his father also charged, allegedly helping to hide the body. and the cdc, and a new study about lowering the risk of covid when you fly. the cdc says keeping middle seats open could reduce passenger exposure by more than 50%. just as some major airlines now fill those middle seats. when we come back, some news coming in about first lady dr. jill biden. and some news tonight about us here at abc news. future. which is why it's good to know exactly how you'll get there. for more than 150 years, generations have trusted the strength and stability of pacific life to protect their tomorrows. because protecting those you care about with life insurance and retirement solutions is a winning game plan.
5:50 pm
ask a financial professional about pacific life. new pronamel mineral boost helps protect teeth against everyday acids. ask a financial professional about pronamel boosts enamel's natural absorption of calcium and phosphate - helping keep teeth strong, white and protected from sensitivity. new pronamel mineral boost
5:51 pm
people everywhere living with type 2 diabetes are waking up to what's possible with rybelsus®. ♪ you are my sunshine ♪ ♪ my only sunshine... ♪ rybelsus® works differently than any other diabetes pill to lower blood sugar in all 3 of these ways... increases insulin... decreases sugar... and slows food. the majority of people taking rybelsus® lowered their blood sugar and reached an a1c of less than 7. people taking rybelsus® lost up to 8 pounds. rybelsus® isn't for people with type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. don't take rybelsus® if you or your family ever had medullary thyroid cancer, or have multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2, or if allergic to it. stop rybelsus® and get medical help right away if you get a lump or swelling in your neck,
5:52 pm
severe stomach pain, or an allergic reaction. serious side effects may include pancreatitis. tell your provider about vision problems or changes. taking rybelsus® with a sulfonylurea or insulin increases low blood sugar risk. side effects like nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may lead to dehydration which may worsen kidney problems. wake up to what's possible with rybelsus®. ♪ please don't take my sunshine away ♪ you may pay as little as $10 per prescription. ask your healthcare provider about rybelsus® today. to the "index" of other news. and first lady dr. jill biden underwent a medical procedure today. president biden going with her to an outpatient center this morning. the white house calling it a common medical procedure. saying she's fine, and is now resuming her normal schedule. and tonight, some news about abc news. kimberly godwin has been named the next president of abc news,
5:53 pm
making her the first black woman to lead a broadcast network's news division. godwin spent more than a decade at cbs, most recently serving as their executive vice president of news. she spent many years in local news before that, in communities across this country. peter rice, chairman of disney general entertainment content, saying throughout kim's career, she has distinguished herself as a fierce advocate for excellence, collaboration, and inclusion, and for the vital role of accurate news reporting. godwin saying she is honored to take on this stewardship and that she's excited for what we will achieve together. and we are too. when we come back, one of the best zooms we've seen. the surprise, "america strong." home... it's not just a place. home is a feeling you live in and when your home is happier, you feel happier.
5:54 pm
which means, you can celebrate happier or organize happier, or just be happier. every room, every moment, everything you need to home, happier. bed, bath & beyond. happier. metastatic breast cancer is relentless, but i'm relentless every day. and having more days is possible with verzenio, proven to help you live significantly longer when taken with fulvestrant. verzenio + fulvestrant is for women with hr+, her2- metastatic breast cancer that has progressed after hormone therapy. diarrhea is common, may be severe, or cause dehydration or infection. at the first sign, call your doctor, start an anti-diarrheal, and drink fluids. before taking verzenio, tell your doctor about any fever, chills, or other signs of infection. verzenio may cause low white blood cell counts, which may cause serious infection that can lead to death. life-threatening lung inflammation can occur. tell your doctor about any new or worsening trouble breathing, cough, or chest pain. serious liver problems can happen. symptoms include fatigue, appetite loss,
5:55 pm
stomach pain, and bleeding or bruising. blood clots that can lead to death have occurred. tell your doctor if you have pain or swelling in your arms or legs, shortness of breath, chest pain and rapid breathing or heart rate, or if you are nursing, pregnant or plan to be. every day matters. and i want more of them. ask your doctor about verzenio. i brought in ensure max protein, with thirty grams of protein. those who tried me felt more energy in just two weeks! ( sighs wearily ) here, i'll take that! ( excited yell ) woo-hoo! ensure max protein. with thirty grams of protein, one-gram of sugar, and nutrients to support immune health! ( abbot sonic ) whoa, susan! ohhh... i'm looking for coupon codes. well, capital one shopping instantly searches for available coupon codes and automatically applies them. save me some cheddar! capital one shopping. it's kinda genius. what's in your wallet? ♪ ♪ are you ready to join the duers? those who du more with less asthma. thanks to dupixent. the add-on treatment for specific types of moderate-to-severe asthma.
5:56 pm
dupixent isn't for sudden breathing problems. it can improve lung function for better breathing in as little as 2 weeks and help prevent severe asthma attacks. it's not a steroid but can help reduce or eliminate oral steroids. dupixent can cause serious allergic reactions including anaphylaxis. get help right away if you have rash, shortness of breath, chest pain, tingling or numbness in your limbs. tell your doctor if you have a parasitic infection and don't change or stop your asthma treatments, including steroids, without talking to your doctor. du more with less asthma. talk to your asthma specialist about dupixent. if your financial situation has changed, we may be able to help.
5:57 pm
finally tonight here, we're grateful to our teachers in this pandemic. and the students are, too. the teacher, "america strong." tonight, the surprise thank you for a teacher in this pandemic. >> we're going to look at probability. >> reporter: ms. wendy franklin, a biology teacher at winston churchill high school in potomac, maryland. >> no one is on camera right now. >> reporter: she asks why none of her students are on camera. >> ms. franklin? >> yeah? >> well, the whole class wanted to thank you for being such a warm and bright and happy person during this whole semester. >> oh, i'm going to cry. >> reporter: suddenly, each of the students holding their own thank yous. >> aw, thank you, guys. that's so sweet. i very much appreciate it. >> thank you, ms. franklin. >> how am i supposed to teach now? geez, i'm teared up.
5:58 pm
>> we couldn't do it without you. you're such a great teacher. >> reporter: and the students on why they did it. >> ms. franklin helped her students grow as people. >> always keeping us engaged, having fun. >> always there for us, with questions we had, clarification, or even just life advice. >> reporter: and ms. franklin, too. >> what i can tell you, david, is that that thank you message nearly made my heart explode with gratitude. >> we loved it. gratitude for ms. franklin and for all of our teachers. i'll see you tomorrow. good night.
5:59 pm
tonight if you all come all down to >> we are starting this out. we are having a couple of technical issues. we are
6:00 pm
sorting these out in just a moment. this is abc 7 news. tonight it could all come to a head to -- for a small town whose mayor faces a fight for survival against sexual assault accusations. thank you for joining us. for weeks we have bhave b reporting on the sonoma county town of windsor. it's mayor, dominic foppoli has been accused of sexual assault and denies. >> they have targeted the winery he owned and there are more and more calls for his resignation. tonight, town council will make a formal request for him to step down. j.r. stone is live at that meeting which is happening right jr? >> reporter: dan,

21 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on