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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 14, 2018 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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>> i have not seen anything that gives me reason to believe this has linked to terrorism at this point. >> what about a hate crime? >> we are keeping our focus as the wide as possible so we don't miss something by focusing too narrowly. >> the police have not said a relationship between of the victims of these bombings.
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however, "the washington post" is reporting this morning, that the stepfather of one of the victims is good friends with the grandfather of another victim. that's really the only connection that we have seen reported so far. austin police are offering a $65,000 reward. they received more than 250 calls about suspicious packages all false alarms so far. a charlotter bus ran off i- in alabama before dawn today. it plunged more than 50 feet into a ravine.kill. more than three dozen passengers hurt. some seriously. the bus did have seatbelts, which may have saved lives. rescuers used ropes to rappel down to the victims. look at those pictures. the band was heading home to houston from the disney world. members posed for this picture just hours before that crash. the president today joined british prime minister teresa may calling for russia to come clean on the poisoning of a
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former spy in england. while that was happening we learned another russian turned up dead in london. charlie d'agata is there. >> reporter: the body of russian exile nikolai gluskov was found, and comes two weeks after a poisoning by a military grade a jenlt ma agent made in russia. now joins a list of 14 other russians who have died on british soil. some, under mysterious circumstances, and whose cases are now being reviewed. the two remain in critical condition. as does the first police detective on the scene. a particularly lethal nerve agent. >> unbelievably cruel, unpleasant way to go. >> toxicologist says it wouldn't take much. >> in term we are talking about.
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literally, few drops here are sufficient to actually do away with some one. the real crucial question is, how you deliver it. >> novichok made by mixing two relatively harmless compound together and becomes instantly lethal. usually found as liquid. can be sprayed or swallowed. >> we speak of these as weapons of terror. they really are. >> meanwhile in russia, foreign minister, sergei lavarov dismissed allegations as nonsense and demanded the british hand over a sample of the nerve agent. >> the russians had until midnight tonight to provide some explanation on how that nerve agent made it to britain. jeff, now it is up to prime minister teresa may to follow through on threats to increase sanctions, freeze the assets of russian oligarchs here and maybe expel diplomats. >> charlie d'agata. president trump flew to
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california to get the first close-up look at eight prototypes for a border wall. the president says that existing fences aren't tall enough to keep undocumented immigrants out. >> getting over the top is easy. these are like professional mountain climbers. incredible climbers. they can't climb some of these walls. some of them they can. those are the walls we are not using. >> mr. trump says the new wall will top 99% of illegal immigration. coming up next, outrage over the death of a dog forced to fly in an ♪ tired of constantly battling lingering smells in your home, like pet, shoe, and body odors? for long-lasting, continuous freshness, try febreze plug. febreze plug provides 45 days of freshness, with a unique dual chamber design that alternates between harmonized scents for a continuous renewal of fragrance. plus, febreze plug is formulated with odorclear technology, which cleans away odors instead of just masking them. for freshness you'll notice week after week,
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it won't let you down. united airlines taking criticism over another incident on a flight. kris van cleave on how a pet carried aboard a plane wound up dead with a warning some images can be disturbing. here is kris van cleave. social media outrage over this picture. a family's french bulldog puppy dead in its carrier after a united airlines flight attendant forced them to put the dog and in an overhead bin for a flight.
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the dog belonged to a mother traveling with two young children from houston to new york's la guardia airport monday night. before takeoff the bag apparently extended into the aisle. witnesses posted online the passenger explaned there was a dog in the bag. the flight attendant insisted it go in the overhead. the flight attendant told the airline she did not realize the pelt was inside. united says this is a trajic accident that should have never occurred. pets should never be placed in the overhead bin. we assume full responsibility for this tragedy and express our deepest condolences to the family and are committed to supporting them. united and delta limited what animals are allowed in the cabin, following, a flier trying to bring a peacock. a smaller dog in a carrier that fits under the seat is typically allowed. united says it is thur troely investigating to keep something like from ever happening again. but this is just the latest pr nightmare for the airline. remember last year a passenger was bloodied and drug off a
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united airlines flight. now the family that owned this puppy, has not commented. jeff. kris van cleave, thank you very much. when we come
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memorial on the lawn of the capital. 7,000 pairs of shoes saying the number of children shot to death in the u.s., since the 2012 sandy hook massacre. advocates for tougher gun laws planning a nationwide school walkout tomorrow. one month after the florida high school attack. prosecutors said they will seek the death penalty for nicholas cruz, the suspect in the parkland shooting. ready to plead guilty if his life was spared. cruz, 19, charged with 17 counts of first degree murder. john mcentee, the president's personal assistant removed from his job today. the white house would not say
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why. cbs said being investigated for financial crimes. since hired by the president's re-election campaign. we now turn back the clock, 80 years to march 13th, 1938. >> a program of st. louis blues scheduled for this time has been canceled. speaking to you from new york opening columbia short wave transatlantic program to cover the key cities of europe. >> robert trout with the first cbs news world roundup. germany invaded austria, america introduced to another legend that day. this is edward murrow speaking from vienna. it is now nearly 2. 30. in the morning, and, has not yet arrived. edward r. murrow, the world news roundup, longest running net work newscast still heard daily on the cbs radio network. time on the roundup, 8 past the hour. >> that's right. up next here, the man fighting for medals on the ice after
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earning them on the battle field. >> announcer: this portion is
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we end with a story, paralympics in south korea. holly williams met americans who have struck gold. >> brena huckabe had to fight her way back to take gold in snowboardcross. >> the first gold medal.
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>> i felt nauseated all night because it was so much emotion. >> the young mother from baton rouge, louisiana is used to a challenge. >> i have a running leg and snow board leg. >> lost her right leg to bone cancer at age 14. she is also the first ever amputee athlete to pose for sports i"sports illustrated" sw edition. >> to see myself out there. showing you you are perfect no matter who you are. i inspired myself in it. it was incredible. >> weaving and shoots and scores. >> on the ice rink, the u.s.-led hockey team is hoping for a third consecutive gold in pyeongcha pyeongchang. >> shoots and scores. >> in sport nothing short of brutal. they say, being lower to the ground, only makes it more dangerous. >> the puck hit the glass, glass gives. in sled hockey you hit the board board does not gi. >> you can knock yourself out. >> knock some one else out.
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>> these team members are all former marines. and lost all or part of both legs while serving their country. >> josh mishovitz hit by a home made bomb in afghanistan in 2011. >> only thing i don't remember is the blast. i've woke up my, right leg was gone. left leg was going that way. >> he went through months of rehab. postponing his homecoming until he could walk again. >> when you first get injured. blown up. you have no idea what to expect. you start playing hockey, you are going out, doing whatever you want to do. and it's like, oh i'm normal again, you know. >> the truth is though they're anything but normal. >> the u.s. has another solid victory. >> because they're superb athletes at the very top of their game. >> smooth as silk. >> holly williams, cbs news, pyeongchang, korea. that is the "overnight news" for this wednesday.
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hi, everyone, welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. black tuesday at the state department. president trump tweeted he fired rex tillerson. the president insisted a mutual decision in the works for a while. but when tillerson's top aide disputed the explanation he was fired as well. margaret brennan begins the coverage. >> i received a call from the president of the united states. little after noon from air force one. >> shaken rex tillerson relinquished control of the state department. warned in an early saturday morning phone call from white house chief of staff, john kelly.
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kelly his job was in jeopardy. tillerson traveling in africa cut short his trip. hours after landing in washington today, tillerson learned he had been fired and would be replaced by cia director mike pompeo. >> with mike, mike pompeo, we have a very similar thought process. i think it is going to go well. >> president trump who often says he likes different points of view said he fired america's top diplomat because they disagreed on foreign policy. >> i actually got along well with rex but really a different mind set different thinking. >> the president said they clashed over the iran nuclear deal. he wants to tear up the international agreement. while tillerson cautioned that breaking america's commitment could make it harder to reach a deal with north korea. >> on face the nation sunday, director pompeo skirted questions about whether tillerson would lead the talks. >> tillerson said this will be done through him its that the plan. >> a level of discussion the president is going to drive this effort, this negotiation. it will take a team to build out the picture. >> reporter: the president also
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rejected tillerson's advice to stick with u.s. commitments to the paris climate change accord and asia pacific free trade deal. he overruled tillerson and instead took jared kushner's advice to relocate the u.s. embassy in israel to jerusalem this year. tillerson told 60 minutes last month he had no plans to resign dismissed reports, but did not deny that he called president trump a moron in a private meeting. >> did you call the president a moron? >> i'm not going to dignify the question. we got so many bigger issues that we could be talking about. >> it was tillerson's experience as globetrotting ceo of exxon mobile that convinced mr. trump to appoint him. >> i will now return to private life as a private citizen as a proud american, proud of the opportunity i have had to serve my country. >> it is not clear when director pompeo will begin.
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one of his first decisions whether to withdraw from the iran nuclear deal in may. the war of words between britain and russia grew hotter as an exile was found dead in london under mysterious circumstances. just the latesten a string of deadly attacks on the enemies of vladamir putin. charlie d'agata is there. >> reporter: the body of russian exile nikolai gluskov was found, and comes two weeks after a poisoning by a military grade a agent made in russia. an opponent of vladamir putin and now joins a list of 14 other russians who have died on british soil. some, under mysterious circumstances, and whose cases are now being reviewed. the two remain in critical condition. as does the first police detective on the scene. a particularly lethal nerve agent.
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>> unbelievably cruel, unpleasant way to go. >> toxicologist says it wouldn't take much. >> in term we are talking about. literally, few drops here are sufficient to actually do away with some one. the real crucial question is, how you deliver it. >> novichok made by mixing two relatively harmless compound together and becomes instantly lethal. usually found as liquid. can be sprayed or swallowed. >> we speak of these as weapons of terror. they really are. >> meanwhile in russia, foreign minister, sergei lavarov dismissed allegations as nonsense and demanded the
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british hand over a sample of the nerve agent. >> the russians had until midnight tonight to provide some explanation on how that nerve agent made it to britain. jeff, now it is up to prime minister teresa may to follow through on threats to increase sanctions, freeze the assets of russian oligarchs here and maybe expel diplomats. >> charlie d'agata. president trump inspected prototypes for his planned border wall. >> getting over the top is easy. these are professional mountain climbers. incredible climbers. they can't climb some of these walls. some of them they can. those are the walls we are not using. >> austin texas remains a city on edge this morning. police say it took a skilled bomb maker to create the explosives left on three doorsteps over the past two weeks. two people were killed in the attacks. david begnaud reports from the scene of the first explosion. >> so thises where mr. haus was injured in the explosion and later died. said if you go you will get an idea of what kind of damage was done by the bomb. here's what we found. side wall right here, see the damage there.
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the door is boarded up. unclear if it was blown out. and neighbors told us they actually found shrapnel in this wall. in fact the next door neighbor says there was shrapnel 75 feet from mr. haus' front door. this is where he collapsed as his neighbor ran up. >> he collapsed right there. >> three feet in front of the door. >> three feet. >> anthony haus was bleeding from his face, had shrapnel in his chest and both hands were nearly blown off. according to his neighbor, sean phillips the first to reach him and stride to save his life. >> was the victim able to till you anything? >> no he wasn't responding to his name. his eyes ore -- were open but he looked glazed over. >> his daughter was inside the house. >> yesterday. police received reports of two explosions. the first came at 6:44 a.m. monday. a teenager was killed when he picked up a package and brought the bomb inside his kitchen. >> the second call was at 11:50 a.m., a 75-year-old woman critically injured by a blast
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that happened on her porch. >> this is not something that we have seen happen in our country quite some time. it is absolutely nothing that has happened in austin. >> brian manley, interim police chief in austin says explosives were disguised as packages left overnight near the victims' front doors. >> did the packages explode when the persons picked them up or walking up to them? >> we have had packages that exploded when the victim picked the package up we have had one where the victim picked the package up, brought it into the residents and opened it up it exploded at that point. >> the chief says packages are not being mailed or coming from any official delivery service. >> i have not seen anything that gives me reason to believe this has linked to terrorism at this point. >> what about a hate crime? >> we are keeping our focus as the wide as possible so we don't miss something by focusing too narrowly. >> the police have not said a relationship between of the victims of these bombings.
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however, "the washington post" is reporting this morning, that the step why did i want a crest 3d white smile?
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hav lane -- avalanches have killed 16 people. in squaw valley, california. rescuers dug out the man after he was buried alive. at north america's largest ski resort, it is the job of the ski patrol to keep the slopes safe. carter evans reports. >> looking for clearance for two sleds. valley, alpine en route. >> 6:00 a.m. at the base of whistler mountain. avalanche for caster, and his dog, zeus, head uphill to start their day. today we are shooting our targ
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egts a targets are along the ridge line. >> reece erecent snowstorms havd the areas with unstable snow. >> ready to fire. >> we have got over 200 slide paths on whistler mountain alone. after a storm, it takes us a couple hours to get everything open. >> once the it leaves the gun it is in midair, arms and debt nats on impact. >> how serious of a threat are avalanches here? >> they can be a serious threat. that's part of our main job here its to mitigate any kind of serious avalanche hazard. >> as a supervisor with whistler ski patrol, tracy and team of 60 use variety of method to keep unstable snow from dangerously building up and breaking loose. >> head over to the slow runner. >> before they deploy any of the tools it all starts with see if yens. >> well just do a little dig. and we'll kind of punch at it to
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sort of see what kind of reach cyst a resistance it has. >> checking layers of snow. >> does the different types of layer, indicate a slide in circumstances. >> it is. >> magnifying glass. for looking at layers. >> the doctor's kit for snow analysis. >> pretty much. >> he has been monitoring this roped off plot of what is known as snow study terrain all season. see that there. the fact it broke apart when you were tapping. shows weakness. >> that means there is potential for avalanches. the devastating, combination of gravity and snow that is every ski resorts worth nightmare. so when avalanche conditions form. snow science turns to preventative action. does that mean you hit them harder with larger explosive. >> hit it harder. >> hit the snow pack with these. explosives, made out of petn, or
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each with the explosive force of a stick of dynamite. we have many guests that come here. want to ski in avalanche terrain. doug mcfarland oversees all operations and includes many facets of avalanche control. a lot of terrain. in the ski runs. passes. kick out a slide. people below you. creating a hazard to the skier below. effective avalanche control. prior to you going there. >> if the terrain is tricky where the patrol teams have to navigate or use a helicopter to actually, make the whole thing go faster. what you can do is, you can get, surgical with the helicopter. get that shot exactly where you want it. what are you frying to hit. targets. up here on the ridge line. up by the top of whistler mountain. large, overhanging features, by the wind, top of the ridge
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lines. and, want to nick them down. >> for obvious reasons, this mission flies after the lifts are closed and skiers are long off the mountain. the fuses on the explosives are 2:15. once he lights them. and drops three out of the helicopter. that will give us a minute to move out of the way before the explosion. >> preparing to open the door. >> opening the door. >> shot is away. i can see the next target there. shot its away. the next target. shot its away. >> shot is away. >> nice placement. that's better. and it is complete. >> we didn't get much as way of results, shot, one and three.
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shot two. we got a good result. so we are happy with that. >> size two avalanche. >> size two large enough to bury or kill a person. >> that's exactly the sort of tragedy whistler ski patrol works sun rise to sunset to prevent. carter evans, whistler, british columbia. there are growing concerns abut the effects of digitally altered video. fake video created from clips of "saturday night live," how they can make hillary clinton, vladamir putin or you say or do anything. tony dokoupil reports. >> imagine this a world leader appearing on individually to give a speech that never actually occurred. computer generated image remade this more possible than ever. and while the technology does have legitimate uses, experts are afraid it could sew chaos or even war. >> good evening, america. >> alec baldwin is to some a perfect stand in for donald trump. >> china, china.
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>> stake day look at this. that's president trump's real face on the right. digitally stamped on to baldwin's performance. >> testing. testing. >> part of a wave of doctored awedy and video spreading on line. >> the idea that someone could put another person's face on an individual's body. that would be a home run for any one who wants to interfere in a political process. >> senator mark warner believes manipulated video. >> the investigation is on going. >> could be a game changer in global politics. >> this is the new reality by 2020. potentially, as early as this year. >> this is going so well. >> anonymous maker of the trump video made videos of hillary clinton and vladamir putin. in a message he said he does it for fun. though he sees the potential for fake news, he adds, people will have to adapt as the tech is here to stay.
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>> are we ready? >> no, absolutely not ready for this. absolutely not ready for it. on so many levels we are not ready for it. >> he runs a lab at dartmouth, aimed at exposing digital fakes. >> i want to replace your face with nicholas cage's. >> for starters we asked him to make one. >> why nick cage? >> it awesome. >> identifiable in the first frame. i will play it. there on a mobile device. look at that all day long. that i tell you is a compelling fake. >> the method recently pub lushlush published on line is one of several, he is tracking. this can change facial expressions in real time. this adobe program can create new audio from text. >> i separated from my mother. >> out of the gate that is terrifying. terrifying. i can create the president of the united states saying anything i want. >> adobe calls this early stage research project. while the company acknowledges
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potential for objectionable use it bleeftz telieves the positiv of technology will overshadow negative. all method have legit matt uses in digital video and design. but fared worries they'll be woep uponi weaponized. the other country reacts within minutes. second. we have a global nuclear war. >> his lab is developing tools to quickly identify fakes. >> what you have is undoctored image. even pulse. doctored image. >> fared suggests this its just the beginning of a longer strug m. >> fake news phenomenon not going away, add fake images, audio, video you have an explosion of, what i would call information war. >> there is no democrat or republican that would be safe from this kind of manipulation. but, boy, oh, boy, we have as a country how to get our act together. >> the cbs "overnight news" will
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be right back. hey, need fast heartburn relief?
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try cool mint zantac. it releases a cooling sensation in your mouth and throat. zantac works in as little as 30 minutes. nexium can take 24 hours. try cool mint zantac. no pill relieves heartburn faster. new law makes it illegal to smoke while driving with a minor in the law. the brain child of five girl scouts. barry peterson has their story. >> they are the youngest movers-and-shakers in aurora
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colorado. 13-year-old, julianna martin knows. >> we aren't the type of people who are giver-uppers. >> started as a girl scout project. create a city ordinance. take it to the city council. their proposed ordinance would make it illegal for an adult to smoke in a car if there is a a child 18 or under in the same vehicle. >> city council heard the concerns. >> nancy rogers, aurora's senior assistant city attorney helped them craft the legal language. >> i like that young girls are interested in the legislative process. >> is this an empowering thing for girls? >> i think so. i think so. there is not many women that are in local government at the elected level. >> there was home work. like researching similar laws in other states. eight states and puerto rico have such measures in place. there are no such laws in colorado. >> good evening. we are girl scout troop 60789. >> then came their night to advocate for their law.
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>> the health problems that can affect minors are, really bad asthma attacks. >> if caught and pulled over you will face consequences of a $150 fine, which will be raised by $50 for each offense. no less than 48 hours of community service. >> when julianna handed the ordinance to the may your she was nervous. >> normally what we do is say please give these to the city clerk. that was then. this is now. now you have talked in front of the city council. we are never going to shut you up are we? >> no. >> you are going to stand up for things. >> yes. >> from now on? >> yes. >> because now you have learned what? >> now i learned that, it takes a little bit of courage and, knowledge, and perseverance. >> it was close. some council members thought it was too much government intervention. the vote, was a nail biter. a 5-5 tie until the mayor cast the deciding vote for.
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amelia wasn't surprised that they won. >> we are all strong women. we are a good group. we know each other really well. >> the law is a secondary violation. so if the police stop you for something else and then, see that you are smoking in a car with a child under 18. that's when you get cited. >> for doing this, they each earned the silver star. the highest girl scout honor for their age group. and while they learned a good lesson. they also taught the grownups a lesson. >> do you think people listen enough to, to, people of your age. >> no. i feel like some times we are looked down upon because we are kids. we don't know anything. but we do. >> and you proved it. >> yes. >> better watch out next time we say just kids. right? >> yeah. >> not to be rude to our parents. but i think we accomplished more at our age than they did in like their first 20 years.
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>> you are really going to say
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should i be making motorcycles? yes, you like motorcycles. should i start a motorcycle company? yes! you really like motorcycles! should i make a squarespace website for it? yes, they're very good websites. but why am i in the desert talking to myself? don't ask me. ♪ ok. [motorcycle revs away] ♪ music fades
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a. >> we found a man, what to do with all the antique washing machines he has collected. >> you have got a problem. >> i do have a problem. >> 87-year-old, lee maxwell had to build a ware house to store all of the objects of his obsession. >> first automatic, 1937. >> what's more is there is more. >> no. >> way more. >> no! >> behind that one warehouse. >> no! >> there is a second warehouse. again, filled with nothing but washing machines. >> i told you it was insane. >> it is one of the largest personal collections of anything
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in america. and lee says it all be innocently enough with this one may tag. he had just retired as an electrical engineering professor was on a road trip with his wife barbara when he saw this at a farm auction in iowa. >> by the time we got to maine, we had four. and that's where the, the, fur started to fly. she was thinking bad things about me. >> very bad things. >> lost my rocker. i think maybe i did. >> by the time they got home, lee had bought a trailer to haul them. >> squeezer, scrubber combination. >> today nearly 1500 different machines in his collection. ones that you power. ones that use power. >> chief this one here. >> he has a model that was never mass produced that tran on child labor. >> this would be one kipd here. one here. >> then they would teeter-totter. isn't that in ven tich.
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a -- inventive. >> what i found amazing he restored the machines. fiends them in this condition and spends a couple weeks fixing each one. working ten hours a day. seven days a week. >> so what is your dilemma now? >> trying to find a home for it. so the thing can be preserved. >> do you think about this often? >> i do. every day. >> and, steve hartman or bill gates or something. >> he would look to find a ben factor. >> preferably a bill gates. >> someone who can build a proper museum. dedicated to the human ingenuit for the washing machines we have today. you can't leave without being struck by how many washing machines have changed over the years. >> do you know how to turn this on? >> absolutely not. >> and how men are pretty much the same. steve hartman, on the road, in eaton, colorado. >> you tell me. that's the "overnight news" for wednesday.
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for some of you the news continues for others check back continues for others check back later for the morning news a captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, march 14th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." groundbreaking physicist stephen hawking dies at 76. hawking refused to allow a debilitating disease to stop his work, which led to major discoveries on black holes and relativity. >> it took a little longer than we thought, but we did it. >> the democratic candidate in the southwestern pennsylvania special election declares victory, but his opponent is not conceding. the hora

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