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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 23, 2018 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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>> dr. stanley: remember this: cannot change the laws of god. when he has visited you in some form of adversity and he brings you through that, that's like he has increased the strength of the foundation of your life and your faith in him. [music]
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storm has been beating down on parts of california. the rain is wreaking havoc on roadways across the state. in downtown los angeles 13 people were injured when two buses collided on a rain-slicked freeway. this road began to collapse when a hillside gave way. farther north, fire crews rescued stranded motorists caught by fast-moving flood waters. >> thank god nobody was hurt. >> reporter: the saturated ground caused this 70-year-old pine street to fall across the street into another property. but the storm also supplied some much-needed powder in the sierra mountains. with more than five feet of snow in the last 24 hours, mammoth mountain employees tried to shovel out the lifts. the biggest cause for concern is still in montecito, a town that's just starting to rebuild after january's deadly mudslides. renee grubb is riding out the storm in her house. >> you know there's something happening up there and you just don't know what it is. >> reporter: the water below me is the color of chocolate milk.
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the fire chief tells me that is an indicator there is new debris coming off the mountainside and until new vegetation grows up there these evacuations could be the new normal for at least the next few years. jeff? >> mireya, thank you. millions in the east are recovering from the fourth nor'easter this month. parts of new york and pennsylvania got more than a foot and a half of heavy snow. on long island one person was killed in an accident. another had a heart attack while shoveling snow. more than 47,000 homes and businesses are still without power, down from about 85,000 at the height of the storm. more spring snow could hit the area early next week. coming up next, what the gunman was up to in the days before the las vegas massacre. the video has been released. what if you had a medical emergency away from home?
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1st massacre. he seems like any other hotel guest, even as he planned the attack that would leave 58 people dead. jim axelrod has more. >> reporter: the video begins six days before the shooting. monday september 25th stephen paddock is seen checking into his suite on the 32nd floor of the mandalay bay. what follows is a haunting collection of surveillance images, capturing paddock getting on and off elevators, playing video poker, eating alone in the hotel sushi restaurant, interacting with hotel and casino staff, and transporting his arsenal of 23 guns and thousands of rounds of ammo in nearly two dozen suitcases and containers. the last we see of him is on the day of the shooting, gambling all night in a high-limit slot machine area before returning to his room at 7:37 in the morning. at quarter past noon he makes one more trip to the parking garage, returning in just a few
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minutes with two more suitcases. he gets off the elevator a few seconds before 12:30. ♪ a little more than nine hours later jason aldean would start playing. [ gunfire ] and 25 minutes after that the shooting would begin. [ gunfire ] [ screaming ] nearly six months later we may know more about what stephen paddock was doing and when but still nothing about why. >> i think if we don't know by now i doubt that we ever will know. >> reporter: randy sutton was a lieutenant with the las vegas police department for nearly 24 years before retiring in 2010. >> stephen paddock is like the bogeyman. he appeared out of nowhere, didn't appear to have any particular motivation. and at this point it's just -- it's a head scratcher. >> $31 million was raised to help victims of the shooting. that money should be distributed by the end of this month. families of the 58 dead get
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$275,000 each, as do another 10 people who suffered brain damage or were paralyzed. last november a class action lawsuit was filed against the hotel. >> and they were the ones that released this video. all right, jim, thank you very much. coming up next here, the new backpack students at stoneman douglas high school are required now to wear.
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eight new security measures went into effect today at marjory stoneman douglas high school in parkland, florida. eight florida hhwatl officers are now guarding the entrances to the school where a gunman last month killed 14 students and three adults. more officers are patrolling inside. when students return from spring break they will have to use clear backfax like the one you see here. they will also have to wear i.d. badges and go through handheld metal detectors. on saturday stoneman douglas students are marching in washington for strict gun laws. we will have live coverage here on cbs television and our streaming service cbsn. president trump today again said he would like to speak with the special counsel in the russia investigation. today also mr. trump's lead lawyer resigned. john dowd exits days after mr. trump added joe digenova to the
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legal team. he has accused the fbi of trying to frame the president. fighting words from the 71-year-old president and 75-year-old joe biden. here was the former vice president tuesday commenting on the president's treatment of women. >> if we were in high school, i'd take him behind the gym and beat the hell out of him. >> today the president responded by saying "crazy joe biden is trying to add like a tough guy. actually, he is weak, both mentally and physically. he doesn't know me, but he would go down fast and hard crying all the way." two cops in shaker heights, ohio put their paramedic skills to good use. body camera video shows how they saved a choking baby. they spotted the mom's car stopped at an intersection. the officers quickly removed two-month-old tyra from the car and then performed, as you see, this version of the heimlich maneuver for infants. an officer placed tyra face down on his forearm and gently tapped her back. about a minute later tyra was breathing again and back in her
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mother's arms. up next here, when the there's only one word for the all new
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staring april 13th at disneyland resort. we end here tonight with golden retrievers and what one of them is doing to help the rest. here's unofficial canine correspondent chip reid. >> go out. >> reporter: the sweet and playful golden retriever, one of the most popular dog breeds in america, with a special talent for getting even so-called grown-ups to join in the fun. >> see, guys, there's nothing to
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it. >> reporter: but as kris campesi has learned through painful experience, they also rate high on another scale. >> goldens have a high probability for cancer. >> reporter: about 60%. one of the highest rates in dog world. she recently lost one golden to cancer, and now 7-year-old malachi has a brain tumor. >> they're such a part of your life, and when it's time for them to go it's hard. >> good boy! >> reporter: looking for answers, she entered 3-year-old nicodemus, who's perfectly healthy, in a national study of about 3,000 golden retrievers. the goal is to understand why the cancer rate is so high. she spends hours each week gathering information. >> i have to keep track of everything they eat, the water they drink, the chemicals i use around the house. >> am i correct that nicodemus has a fitbit? >> yes, he does. it's called a whistle, and it stays on him all the time so that it can record his activity and his sleep. >> hey, buddy.
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how you doing? >> reporter: at frequent medical exams veterinarian lani rhymes takes samples of his hair and nails. >> good boy. >> they're looking for environmental stuff that the dogs might be exposed to that would concentrate in the nails. >> reporter: and even while he's giving blood, that tail keeps on wagging. >> come here. >> reporter: campesi hopes the study will eventually help all dogs, including hers, to live longer lives. >> very nice. >> reporter: and so do they. >> is that your best bud? >> reporter: you see, nicodemus is a therapy dog for special needs children. and they are counting on him to live a long and healthy life. chip reid, cbs news, springfield, virginia. that is the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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york city, i'm jeff glor. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. with a stroke of his pen president trump fired the opening salvo in a new trade war with china. he imposed stiff new tariffs on chinese imports, branding beijing an economic enemy of the united states. major garrett has the story from the white house. >> it is the largest deficit of any country in the history of our world. it's out of control. >> reporter: president trump was talking about china and a trade deficit of more than $375 billion, driven by low-cost labor and trade policies he says unfairly favor beijing. mr. trump set in motion billions
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in tariffs on certain chinese imports. >> it could be about $60 billion. but that's really just a fraction of what we're talking about. >> reporter: commerce secretary wilbur ross. >> we will end up negotiating these things rather than fighting over them. >> reporter: the chinese embassy accused the president of "ignoring rational voices," adding "china is not afraid of and will not recoil from a trade war." fears of exactly that led to a dramatic sell-off on wall street. the dow closed down 724 points, or just under 3%. >> clearly the tariff was the big trigger. >> reporter: cbs business analyst jill schlesinger. >> a tit for tat trade war would be bath for both sides. >> reporter: today's tariff nuancement fulfills a long-standing campaign promise. >> when was the last time you said oh, gee, we beat china? >> we can't continue to allow china to rape our country.
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>> reporter: one of the president's concerns, chinese firms stealing u.s. technology patents and making similar products for less. china also holds the largest portion of america's $21 trillion debt that sxlefrnlg fears of retaliation created anxiety among republicans in congress. iowa senator charles grassley. >> i think i would advise our people in the executive branch, from the president on down, to be very cautious how you approach it. >> reporter: the administration has 15 days to identify which chinese imports will face the new tariffs. it will be at least 30 days after that before those tariffs actually take effect, giving both nations time to find if they want to another way. >> the new tariffs sent the stock market tumbling. the dow was down more than 700 points. and china is vowing to fight back. ben tracy reports from beijing. >> reporter: as made in china products grow, says this child, it has definitely threatened the
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u.s. conservative chinese media is using kids to issue trade threats. "we will fight back fearlessly," says this child. "if they have an eye to us, we will cut out that eye." in its official response china's foreign ministry specifically mentioned boeing airplanes and u.s. soybeans as examples of major u.s. exports that could become targets of china's retaliation. tariffs on soybeans would hit farmers in states such as iowa and ohio hard. tianjun wu is a beijing-based economist. given that the government here keeps saying we don't want a trade war, is there any chance they just let this go? >> i don't think they can let it go. i mean, just looking at the domestic politics, it will be showing the weakness to just let it go. >> the president has talked with affection about his relationship with the chinese president xi jinping. how does that change now? >> reporter: well, it's hard to
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imagine that this makes that relationship any better. you know, president trump has been very blunt, saying he has gone easy on china on trade because he wanted china's help to put pressure on north korea, and apparently the president doesn't feel he needs china's help in quite the way he did even just a few months ago. surveillance video from the mandalay bay casino in las vegas shows how stephen paddock amassed an arsenal of weapons before unleashing the worst mass shooting in modern american history. jim axelrod has the story. >> reporter: video begins six days before the shooting. monday september 25th. stephen paddock is seen checking into his suite on the 32nd floor of the mandalay bay. what follows is a haunting collection of surveillance images capturing paddock getting on and off elevators, playing video poker, eating alone in the hotel sushi restaurant, interacting with hotel and casino staff, and transporting his arsenal of 23 guns and thousands of rounds of ammo in
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nearly two dozen suitcases and containers. the last we see of him is on the day of the shooting, gambling all night in a high-limit slot machine area before returning to his room at 7:37 in the morning. at quarter past noon he makes one more trip to the parking garage, returning in just a few minutes with two more suitcases. he gets off the elevator a few seconds before 12:30. a little more than nine hours later jason aldean would start playing. and 25 minutes after that the shooting would begin. nearly six months later we may know more about what stephen paddock was doing and when but still nothing about why. >> i think if we don't know by now i doubt that we ever will know. >> reporter: randy sutton was a lieutenant with the las vegas police department for nearly 24 years before retiring in 2010.
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>> stephen paddock is like the bogeyman. he appeared out of nowhere, didn't appear to have any particular motivation. and at this point it's a head scratcher. there's outrage in sacramento, california, where a pair of police officers killed an unarmed suspect in a hail of gunfire. john blackstone has the details. >> reporter: sacramento police say the two responding officers believed clark was pointing a gun at them, but despite the newly released police body cam and helicopter video there are still questions about why police fired 20 rounds at clark. >> hey! show me your hands! stop! stop! >> reporter: police body camera video released by the sacramento police department shows the moment two officers opened fire on stephon clark. >> show me your hands! gun, gun, gun! [ gunfire ] 57 shots fired. >> reporter: in the video officers unload a barrage of gunfire at clark, at least 20 rounds in all, killing the
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22-year-old. >> running south. running to the south. >> reporter: police believe clark smashed a number of car windows and a sliding glass door in a south sacramento neighborhood sunday. officers chased him to his grandparents' back yard. police say they thought clark was pointing a gun at them. that's when they fired. >> subject's down in the back yard. >> did he have a gun? >> we haven't secured it. >> reporter: police never found a firearm, only a cell phone. >> we want everybody to see the video. and that's why we made it a priority, so that everybody has the opportunity to see what we have the opportunity to see. >> they came from that direction. >> reporter: they came from this direction. the clark family's attorney m s melissa knowles says nothing in the video will justify the gunfire. for the clark family promising justice. >> you're going to know his name forever. you hear me? like you know trayvon martin and mike brown, eric garner, samir rice, you're going to know him. you're going to remember this.
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>> reporter: clark had prior run-ins with the law including for robbery and domestic violence. sacramento police say the
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." russian president vladimir putin recently unveiled a new generation of nuclear weapons designed, he claims, to thwart u.s. missile defenses. president trump wants to modernize america's nuclear arsenal as well. all that sounds frightening to the man who used to choose the targets for u.s. nuclear strikes. alex wagner has his story. p. >> reporter: for more than 40 years daniel ellsberg has been known as the man who exposed the u.s. government's secrets about the vietnam war. >> i did this clearly at my own jeopardy. >> reporter: but there's an even bigger secret he's been keeping about his involvement in planning for an even bigger war. you said "i was part of a plan
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that should never have been made that was a crime against humanity." >> yes. >> what was the plan? >> the plan was to hit every city in the soviet union and every city in china. there was no plan for fighting soviets that did not also involve annihilating the chinese population. the result was a readiness to annihilate 600 million people. 100 holocausts. when i say crime against humanity, it was actually a crime against the existence of the human species. >> this is the end of days. and that was the plan. >> yes. >> i pray that the coming years will be blessed with peace and prosperity. >> reporter: in the 1960s it was ellsberg's job to update the nuclear plans left by president eisenhow eisenhower. >> you've said this was the most evil plan that ever existed. and yet the people that you knew
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who drafted this plan, were they amoral? >> no. what this revealed to me was something about our species that i've had to live with for the next 50 years and try to understand. they're very normal, ordinary, smart, conscientious, patriotic people working in secret can carry out monstrous plans. but it's the job. and you go to work in the job and you do what the boss wants. when i modified these plans, i for instance tried to get the targeting off cities and off moscow and off china automatically. and actually, i failed in all that. not hitting moscow was just unthinkable. >> they will reduce a doomsday shroud. >> reporter: ellsberg compares the war plans to the 1964 movie "dr. strangelove," which centers on the existence of a doomsday machine meant to automatically respond to a first strike attack with enough nuclear weapons to
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destroy all life on earth. >> and dr. strangelove was a documentary. it saw the mad humor in the situation. >> gee, i wish we had one of them doomsday machines. >> it still makes me laugh when i hear about it because it's hard to take it seriously except that it's very serious indeed. those were and are our preparations for nuclear war. >> he intended to bring the information to the public after the close of the war in vietnam. >> but found publishers then and 30 years later feeling we can't sell this to readers, they don't want to hear anything "waiting for superman" with the word nuclear in the title. that was true up to the present. >> reporter: more than 50 years later ellsberg has published a book about his experience. he wrote the book in his bunker-like office referencing documents in his considerable archives. >> and you created your own library classification system. nuclear notes. >> first use.
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these are threats of first use. there's a lot of notes. >> wow. >> it's a chapter in the book. and this is a draft dated 1995. so people asked me why have you waited to put this stuff out? the truth is i put it out in lectures and sometimes trying to get it out by special means like getting arrested, testifying. putting out all these sectors at the time. >> nobody noticed. >> nobody was interested. >> reporter: but the world is paying attention now. north korean leader kim jong un has been testing intercontinental ballistic missiles. >> they will be met with fire and fury. >> reporter: president trump has threatened the full force of the u.s. military. and russian president vladimir putin shocked the world, unveiling an updated weapons system including a new icbm that he says is invincible. does the brinkmanship feel
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different this time around? >> no. not really. the brinkmanship has been there, as i've said, it was a way of using nuclear weapons without pulling the trigger. using a gun at someone's head in a confrontation without pulling the trigger. using the gun. and to say we haven't used these weapons or that they've proved useless is simply misleading. trump and kim are both using their weapons right now. and one or the other may back down or not. the problem is making similar first use threats. his are threats of crazy action just as ours are. and it doesn't unfortunately mean that they will never be carried out. >> reporter: now 86, ellsberg and his wife, patricia, have been privately living with this knowledge for as long as their nearly 50-year marriage. today it's their fellow citizens who are also living on edge. >> hawaii inadvertently sent out
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a message alerting residents to an incoming missile attack. it was a false alarm. >> what hawaii-d the alert, was to make a million or so hawaiian citizens aware for the first time of the kinds of dangers that we have all in the world been living with for half a century without thinking about them. and what to do. some dived into manholes. many people interestingly sat in ba bathtubs. a total symbolic action. it's not what i would have done. >> what would you have done? >> oh, i would have invited patricia to lie down with me and kiss for as long as the alarm went on. and if it didn't have on, we would have had a good half hour. >> is it a miracle that we haven't had a nuclear holocaust? >> yes. miracles do happen. and by that i don't mean just it was unlikely but it was hard to imagine if you knew what the real risks were.
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it's not impossible that there will be another 70 years. it would take another miracle. what i'm working at is to alerting people to the danger before the alarm sounds. to do hey, need fast heartburn relief? try cool mint zantac. it releases a cooling sensation in your mouth and throat. zantac works in as little as 30 minutes. nexium can take 24 hours. try cool mint zantac. no pill relieves heartburn faster.
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spring break is right around the corner, and millions of americans will be headed to the beach. many have plans to go
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snorkeling. well, there's some new gear out there that could be dangerous. vladimir duthiers went to honolulu for this story. >> reporter: here on hawaii's beaches lifeguards say they are seeing more and more of these. full face snorkel masks. some of the tourists that we've spoken to say they love them. they say they're easier to use than conventional masks and snorkels. but some safety advocates warn that people need to know about the risks that come with wearing these. and for one man's wife that warning came too late. >> she was a water bug. >> she was a water bug. >> yeah. she was a good swimmer. >> reporter: guy cooper and his wife, nancy peacock, traveled the world together. but on her last trip to the hawaiian islands cooper stayed behind at their home in california. he says it haunts him every day. >> i picture her in the water frightened, panicking. trying, struggling with that mask. >> reporter: an avid snorkeler, peacock was trying out a new type of equipment, a full face mask she bought on amazon.
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but less than an hour after entering the water her lifeless body was pulled out by a nearby surfer. >> i started right away thinking about this mask. >> right away. >> because i'm trying to think what could have gone wrong. >> reporter: these masks have a new design that covers the entire face, allowing snorkelers to breathe out of their nose and mouth, unlike the traditional two-piece snorkel equipment. but some safety experts say it's this design that may make it less safe, with greater risk for carbon dioxide build-up that could cause snorkelers to become dizzy or disoriented and tighter-fitting head strapz that may make it harder to pull off in an emergency. something cooper suspects happened to his wife. >> i wrote to the coroner, and i said, wouldn't you want to know what she was using? the e.r. never asked those questions. you never asked those questions. apparently, no one is asking those questions. and couldn't that be a contributing factor? >> reporter: but until last year
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the type of equipment used in snorkel-related deaths or near deaths was never recorded. >> no one will know if they're dangerous or not until you put it in a data base, look for trends. this is ground zero for it. >> hawaii. >> hawaii is ground zero for the snorkeling-related incidents. >> reporter: ralph goto recently retired as honolulu's director of ocean safety after 30 years. he now co-chairs a committee investigating the spike in snorkel-related deaths along with the hawaii department of health. >> there's the full face mask theory. there's issues of pre-existing medical conditions. there's theories of inexperience. and all of them have some credence. so we're asking the first responders to gather the equipment that's involved in these cases. >> reporter: for as for the masks -- >> more and more people are using the full face masks. >> reporter: lifeguards like kawika eka and his team are responsible for the safety of an average of 1600 visitors each day at hanauma bay.
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he says it's too early to know if they put snorkelers into greater danger. >> we're looking into if there is a connection to snorkel drowningings and the full face mask. >> reporter: have you tried one of these? >> yes. >> and what did you think? ? no comment. >> reporter: one manufacturer said in a statement, "the safety of our customers and the performance of our equipment have always been our first priorities." adding the product was put through rigorous testing protocols, including the measurement of potential co2 build-up. the statement went on to say their success has spawned a number of low-cost copycat masks whose expertise, design, and manufacturing experience are unknown. it's something that troubles robert whitner, founder of snorkel bob's, one of hawaii's top snorkel equipment retailers. >> i get three or four inquiries a week from chinese manufacturers, you must carry these, please send your address, we'll send samples. and my response is always the same. no, thank you. please put them in the dumpster. >> reporter: whitner decided against carrying any of the full
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face masks after his researchers tested them. >> they said that the face area heats up and gave them a feeling of claustrophobia. they could not reach their nose to clear. it's hazardous. and if you try to get the mask off in a hurry and you're not thinking clearly, it can stick. >> there are snorkeling fatalities way before there were one-piece masks. i think we have to look at it in totality. is it the snorkel? is it the mask? we don't know for certain right now what's going on, but we're certainly trying to find out. >> reporter: cooper may never know exactly what caused his wife's death. but for now -- >> i just wouldn't want someone else to go through what i went through, losing her. >> reporter: currently, there are no regulations for snorkel equipment in the united states. a consumer products safety commission did respond to guy cooper's complaint, and they say they are look into full face
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masks but they aren't taking any action. cooper says his wife nancy will not have died
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over the past 45 years starbucks has opened more than 25,000 coffee shops in 75 different countries. but so far not one in the birthplace of cappuccino, italy. that's about to change, and not everyone is happy. seth doan reports from milan. >> reporter: in italy this is the daly ritual. and you don't hear the words grande, venti, or frappuccino. coffee is simple and straightforward.
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>> it's our way to enjoy the day. >> reporter: but ask maurtsio cazula about starbucks' plan to open and the tone changes. >> can we cut it? can we cut it? >> reporter: the seattle coffee giant makes for awkward conversation here. >> i like starbucks. i like star dukz. but it's like a big invasion. >> an invasion? >> yeah. >> reporter: tradition runs deep here in italy, and coffee is no exception. but with starbucks planning to open its first store here in milan next year is italian coffee culture under threat? after all the cookies and cream frozen cappuccino is already here. even before starbucks arrives, several american-style coffee shops are catering to changing tastes. >> can you make us a unicorn in the cookies and cream, please? >> reporter: david nathaniel has eight of these 12-ounce coffee joints and plans to open 100 in
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the next five years. >> cheers. >> reporter: here customers can sit and drink from disposable cups. >> we don't want people to stay at the counter. >> isn't there something pu beautiful about that? >> absolutely. but there's plenty in italy like that. so why not give italians an opportunity of having an alternative? >> reporter: we found some americans including bob hodge from ohio lamenting the looming u.s. import. >> i'm not a huge fan of starbucks myself. they've run a lot of the mom and pop coffee shops out of the u.s. >> reporter: now the 150,000-plus small coffee shops here may need to concoct something else strong to hold their ground. seth doane, cbs news, milan. that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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captioning funded by cbs it's friday, march 23rd, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." breaking news. a deadly fire. a firefighter is killed while battling flames that broke out on the set of a movie in new york city. the latest shakeup in the trump administration. a third national security adviser has been named and a member of the president's legal team calls it quits. and congress passes a $1.3 trillion spending bill. it stops the government shutdown for now, but what does it the bill include

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