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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  May 12, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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at 1:00 p.m. looks beautiful. that's going to do it for a monday edition of "way too early." "morning joe" starts right now. so barbara, you're stepping down over after 50 years as a tv journalist. do you have any tips on how to achieve that kind of success? >> develop a signature voice that no one will forget. >> wait. is that not your real voice? >> no. this is my real voice. ello, i'm barbara wawa. the softer the news, the softer the focus on the lens. for example, an interview with the president, okay? an interview with a kardashian. president, kardashian. do not be afraid to ask the
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tough questions like if you're a tree, what kind of a tree would you be? or your place or mine, brokaw. >> good morning, everybody. it's may 12th. welcome to "morning joe." it's good to have you all with us. with us son set jon meacham. hello. >> yes, ma'am. good morning. >> did you have a good mother's day? >> yes, we did very well, i think. i don't know if she would share that. >> i think she might have some criticism. >> there could be. but there are three of them. you figure the odds work out eventually. >> willie geist, did you do well? >> feedback was positive. with the help of my children i should point out. >> they're so cute. thank god. >> did well. >> visiting professor at nyu, former democratic congressman harold ford jr. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> first mother's day. >> first mother's day.
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had a wonderful day. >> and on your birthday. >> 44th birthday. you can imagine i was subordinated. three of us spent the day together yesterday. did you do the work? >> i did a lot of it. >> that's a political answer, did you notice that? >> i could tell. all right. and in washington, columnist and associate editor for "the washington post," david ignatius. david has a new book coming out in a few weeks. it's called "the director." we look forward to that. will you come on and tell us about it? >> you better believe it. i gave a copy to my mother last night. i'll tell you what she said. >> i'd like her review. they tend to be the most honest. >> which is this? >> my ninth. amazingly enough. >> congratulations. >> okay. well, david, thanks for coming in early. we have a lot to talk about in the next few minutes. marco rubio, his strongest
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statement yet in terms of potentially running in 2016. we're going to play some of that interview. interesting concept he has on climate change. he lets that be known. also we have new polling that shows the democrats may have a better chance than you would expect in the midterms. some really surprising numbers that we're going to show. first we'll start overseas where russian separatists are declaring victory after votes in whether ukraine should have greater sovereignty. in one region, 90% supported the single vague question on the ballot. with long lines, makeshift polling places, and no international voters, the vote's legitimacy is being slammed by the government in kiev. washington criticized moscow for not doing more to halt the elections. and while much of the voting was
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peaceful, a city near donetsk, national guardsmen opened fire. in other areas the votes were more festive. david, give us perspective. the backdrop of this voting taking on obviously not good, but what do they mean in the long run given the fact they were almost rudimentary? >> we don't know. the phrasing of the question that people voted on was vague. it said, do you support self rule. not annexation by russia. yesterday's referendum happened even though russian leader vladimir putin said wednesday he thought it should be delayed. separatists on the ground we want ahead. putin certainly didn't try to stop them. he also said he would move troops back to the border. >> why was he saying he wanted it delayed? >> that's been a mystery among
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the analysts i've talked to. the closest i've heard is when angela merkel, the german chancellor, came to washington to meet with obama, they agreed if russia was seen to disrupt the presidential election, the big one coming in another ten days, that that would be reason for the u.s. and europe to impose serious sanctions on russia. that seems to have gotten putin's attention and led to these more calm, restrained statements last week. they didn't make much difference on the ground. i think we can see going into the may 25 election, russia will say part of this country has signalled it wants a different kind of future. so whatever happens, we need a decentralized ukraine that will be much more pliable for russia in the future. >> it also did not stop vladimir
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putin from going to crimea and taking a victory lap on a day that's considered one of the most important days in russia history. that is celebration of the victory in world war ii. >> you know, joe, i found that, frankly, a moving and important reminder of how powerfully the past weighs on the shoulders of vladimir putin and most russians. that the kind of suffering they experienced in world war ii, what they were remembering on victory day, the importance of crimea for them. the things to bear in mind, it was all on display in that visit. and we need to understand the motivations of our adversary in putin. and there it was. you know, returning to this city that symbolizes russian history to take a victory lap. >> if you start to look at this as kind of a doctrine for
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vladimir putin of protecting russian-speaking peoples in the region, you begin to look around the map and there's other places you could circle. moldova is one of them, armenia, kazakhstan. how far does this go for moscow? >> i think that's what all policy makers and analysts both in washington and european capitals are asking now. moldova is probably the most obvious. you have a russian community that claims it's oppressed in the ways russians in eastern ukraines have been claiming. you have large russian populations in some of the baltics that are nato members. that would be explosive if russians were on the borders of estonia or latvia. that would be a much different kind of situation. i think for the moment with putin, there's a sense this a ad
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hoc policy. i don't think he knows his next move. that's what makes it dangerous. >> turning to 2016 politics here. if anybody believed marco rubio was still on the fence for president, his latest interview is leaving little doubt he will go for the office even after suffering from immigration reform. goes as far as to pledge an all or nothing campaign if he decides to run. >> if i decide to run for president, i want to have some sort of exit strategy to run for the senate. that would be a decision not to run for re-election. i believe if you want to be president of the united states, you run for president. you don't run with an eject button. >> do you think you're ready to be president? >> i do. but i think that's true for other multiple people that want o run. i'll be 43 this month but the other thing people don't realize, i've served now in public office for 14 years. i think a president has to have
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a clear vision of where the country needs to go and clear ideas how to get it there. i think we're blessed in our party to have a number of people that fit that criteria. >> senator rubio also took some shots at his potential 2016 challenger hillary clinton and her record as secretary of state. >> i'm sure she's going to go out bragging about her time in the state department. she's also going to have to be prepared to deal with her failures. >> what grade to you give her as secretary of state? >> i don't think she has a passing grade. >> you think she's a "f"? >> yeah. if you look at her time, it has failed everywhere in the world. if she's going do run on her record as secretary of state, she's also going to have to answer for its massive failures. >> and there's just one more. the florida senator also made headlines with his comments on climate change. last week the obama administration unveiled a major report stating that manmade
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climate change isn't a problem in the distant future, it's happening now. but rubio says he disagrees with the scientists. >> how big a threat is climate change? >> i don't agree with the notion that some are putting out there include gd scientists that somehow there are actions we could take today that could change our climate. >> let me get this straight. you do not think human activity has caused warming to our planet. >> i do not believe that human tft is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are portraying it. i do not believe the laws they propose we pass will do anything about it. except they will destroy our economy. >> harold ford, a lot to talk about there. a lot to take in there with marco rubio. what are your take wastes? >> first, he didn't say he wants to do differently. he praised some of had his party
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for ideas, but didn't lay out ideas. not like santorum or romney did saying we're for the minimum wage increase. he still comes across as a little boyish, a little youngish. he'll be 43 this month. >> by the way, 40 is youngish. >> he just turned 44 yesterday. he finds himself very manyture. >> but you're older than marco too. >> finally when he talked about hillary clinton's time as secretary of state and her challenges, he didn't say here's what i would do differently. they can talk about what they think are mistakes, but what i'm not hearing -- and the first time i heard anything affirmative was from santorum and romney. romney on your show last week said i'm for certain things. for rubio and the others to advance, it can't just be they didn't do, they didn't do, they are bad. >> but jon, he certainly put
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himself out there on climate change. >> i give him a pass on that. because it didn't make sense to me. >> there's been climate change historically and he doesn't think that man is impacting that climate change enough to justify legislation that he believes would kill jobs. >> right. >> a position that a lot of republicans would probably agree with. you know, it's this all or nothing thing. democrats are moving to our left. like televangelists where you either believe in their form of climate change like al gore said, the waters are going to rise and we'll be submerged in florida in 50 years or else you're going to hell. some climate hell. there are a lot of us who reject that. i don't associate myself with marco's point, but there are variations of that. you can believe there is climate change, as i do.
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you can believe that human activity has played a role, as i do. but we don't need to adapt job killing legislations. >> he didn't say what you said. >> he didn't. >> but believing we have to go out now and job kill, that will put more americans out. i would believe in a balanced approach. there are variations of that. damn it if you don't believe there is climate change and that, you know, that al gore's right. that florida's going to all be under water within 50 years, i guess 46, 45 years now, then you're not a true believer and you don't love science. i reject that. maybe marco's variation was a little farther than me. >> what i find interesting about that part of the argument is exactly why it is that the base of the republican party seems to
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feel so alienated from the science. what is it in the climate, so to speak, that means -- that suggests that you can't come to a conclusion that human activity is helping drive this and we have to confront it. not with a particular bill in the senate, i'm not saying vote for this or go to hell. but what is it right now that puts the scientific community so far beyond the pail for republicans? >> i don't think it's science. i know it's not science any more than democrats like paul krugman are repulsed by simple math. they don't understand it. they reject it on trying to save social security, medicare, and medicaid for americans years to come. but on this issue, i think speaking of televangelists, i think the far left overplayed their back in '02, '03, '04,
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'05. you can look at polls. don't listen to me. look at the polling numbers from 2004, 2005, 2006. americans were actually bought in to the concept of climate change and that we needed to move aggressively on it. since that time, since the overreach, since there were the climate versions of the salem witch trials where if you didn't believe in the most extreme view, you were anti-scientist. not only did republicans move away from the issue, but most americans began wandering away from the issue. >> would you argue that what rubio was saying was a rational response? >> i would not. >> i would argue that was an overreach. >> why do republicans believe they need to have that? that's an overreach. >> first of all, we talk about republicans to republicans.
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marco's words stand on their own. i think some republicans would agree with marco going against this extremism i was talking about before. i don't know. i haven't seen polls on this, but certainly most of the republicans i talk to, willie, believe there is climate change. they are smart enough to believe 7 billion, 8 billion people have had a huge impact on it. especially what's happening in china. china's the number one producer of damage to the environment now. but they're not willing to just start shutting down factories and changing the way america does things tomorrow to throw millions and millions of people out of work. i don't know. i think there's some subtlety there. >> you get the sense that, yes, republicans who disagree with this point of view do disagree but also resent being hit over
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the head with it. >> you're anti-scientist. agree with al gore or you're anti-scientist. >> you know it's a reaction to that reaction from al gore. if you look at polls where climate change falls in people's concerns. it is important in the long-term, voters just don't really care about it. when they go to a poll, they're not voting based on climate change. that's not going to hurt marco rubio very much. seeg only 25% of republicans in particular say in a primary view climate change as a big problem and manmade. that position he took is not going to hurt him in a primary. >> without al gore, we wouldn't have the hybrid industry we have and the car industry would not have includesed standards. the number one emitter of carbon in our world is farming. he did overreach a bit. >> i'm not bashing al gore here.
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listen, he -- and i said this to him. he was a televangelist for climate change. and i think there have to be those people that are out there that are pushing hard and go as hard as they can go in one direction or another and i'm glad he did it. i personally believe he overreached. >> why are we talking about al gore? if it was someone for substantial, we should talk more. but it was marco rubio playing to the base. i suggest we move on. do you think? >> i disagree. rubio could be instrumental. if he agreed with you? you say he's not going to be a significant candidate in the republican party. >> in order to defend him, you have to move all the way around to al gore and extremism. it was a long road to defend him
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there. think about that one. >> in the long run -- >> actually, no. >> it took you five minutes to explain why marco rubio was okay in his answering. and he wasn't. bad answer. >> let me do it in sektds. a lot of us believe the left have overreached of this issue and we're not going to throw people out because of their ideological beliefs. >> you would agree it's not an irrational response to say republicans are overreaching the other way. >> yeah. including himself. >> if that's how you feel about marco rubio, i'm a republican, i believe in climate change. i believe it's manmade. i believe that man has contributed to climate change. but marco is right. it goes in cycles. and we'll see how those cycles play out. we're so arrogant as a people that if it happened to us last week, then it is this is the worst thing that's happened on the face of the earth.
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you would swear to god they were the first women on the earth to have a baby. they're not. they're not. we're not the -- >> i resemble that as a new dad. >> we're not the first people that have had climate change. am i concerned because it's more extreme than in the past? yes. but it's also been extreme in the past. we need to see what plays out but be careful. you're looking at a guy that's been talking about wanting standards to 40 miles per hour. i've got no problem. let's be careful and do everything we can do. i want a clean earth. you know what? industry can adapt to it. but i'll be damned if i'm going to throw millions of people out of work because somebody's going on an ideological tear. >> no one was. it was just a question. that he didn't answer very well. but you do a good job with the question. >> he didn't do it the way you like. >> no. >> let's get david ignatius in
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here. >> david, was rubio truthful in his answer and would you vote for him. >> what does that mean? >> i am stricken from the record. >> strike that. >> i'm taking this entire road you took us down to distract -- shiny object. >> let david talk. >> well, i want to break up this argument about rubio and climate change by noegt to me the most interesting thing about marco rubio is he is distinguishing himself on foreign policy from the whine of rand paul and ted cruz. he's much more traditional on policy defense issues than these other rising candidates. i think that's the news about marco rubio. he's trying to find a more traditional republican ground even as he appeals on immigration reform. on climate change, i've got nothing that you don't know. >> and also on marco rubio's
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foreign policy, it's not an either/or. it's not rand paul or neocon. republicans have been shoved into those two corners. he's a lot more sensible. it's more along my lines which is more of a colin powell approach which resists the urges of the neocons as well as the extreme rand paul. >> i think he's staking out some pretty familiar territory for republicans on foreign policy. and he's doing so at a time when that's a little bit controversial. also when you talk to marco rubio, he's very good at answering his questions. i think he's going to be a tough candidate. >> i do too. all right. still ahead on "morning joe," senior white house adviser valerie jarrett joins us on set. michael nutter is here with a big announcement from his city, and bill kristol joins the table. up next, the top stories in the politico playbook, but first bill kairns with a check on the
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forecast. thank you, bill. >> colorado we have snow. and in the midwest we dealt with tornadoes all weekend long. let me show you these pictures from missouri. this is one of the worst ones. you could see this twister, you can see how large it was too. went right over the top of this rural town. didn't do a ton of damage. it wasn't the strongest tornado. but incredible pictures of how wide it was. tore a bunch of roofs off. now let me show you a live picture, same storm, the backside of the storm in colorado. winter storm warnings. there's golden, colorado. two ski resorts are still open. and it's snowing in a windchill. it snows in colorado and may every now and then. but this is late in the season for this. let me show you yesterday, 35 tornado reports. a lot of those from nebraska. we didn't have any injuries or fatalities, amazingly.
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so that was great. still dealing with strong storms this morning. just rolling through kansas city up through areas around st. joseph. iowa today one of the stormier drives you'll have. as far as later today, if we're going to get tornadoes doing damage, we're mostly going to target morn missouri and areas of iowa. a lot of heavy rain coming your way in texas. we need it, but this is 4 to 5 inches. we'll have to watch flash flooding from dallas to austin. for everyone in the east coast, enjoyed a beautiful sunday. it looks like a great start to your monday. mid-80 s for the opening of the washington monument in washington, d.c. more "morning joe" when we come back. ♪ i do a lot oresearch on angie's list before i do any projects on my home. i love my contractor, and i am so thankful to angie's list
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welcome back to "morning joe." we were showing a picture of your mom. >> that was so wonderful. >> at the library this weekend. >> what a mother's day weekend. we had an event there, the library. she talked about her new book "the lore of the forest" which is a beautiful set of essays and photos over her 50-year career as a sculptor. >> people were fascinated by her artwork. >> the girls came up on stage. >> there's jen who asked her a great question. and carly's there. she talked about how she was fleeing world war 12 and a lot of ships. >> her boat was hit by a torpedo. >> but it didn't detonate. >> incredible story. >> yeah. she said the night as they were coming over, huge waves, but the light, the sky was lit up all night by boats burning.
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>> amazing. >> of course dr. brzezinski escaped. my gosh. the week before the warsaw uprising. >> they had an interesting background. then there's us. all right. let's take a look -- >> little different than mine. i played t-ball in georgia. then we had to take the two-hour drive to mississippi. >> it was a wonderful, wonderful mother's day. >> wednesday night supper at first baptist church in mississippi? come on. >> had dinner at a lot of first baptist churches. but not there. >> you need to try them. i've done the whole tour. >> okay. time now to take a look at the morning papers. "the washington post." the secret service is facing questions for reportedly diverting assets from the white house to protect the assistant of the director of the agency. the case states back to two months in 2011 when agents were
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sent to a rural area of maryland. a secret service spokesperson says the unit does not have a specific assignment at the white house and says the patrols in question lasts only a few days. >> "the richmond times-dispatch." three people were killed after a hot air balloon caught fire and it exploded. it was landing when it hit a power line. did hear two explosions at that point. at one time the gondola may have separated from the balloon. the pilot and two staffers for the basketball team at the university of richmond were on board. >> "the washington times," the washington monument reopens today. cracks were repaired following the earthquake in august of 2011. the restoration cost $15 million in both public funds and private donations. the monument is the world's
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tallest, free standing stone structure. and that is a live look right now at the washington monument finally without all that scaffolding around it looking beautiful. >> i'm glad they used private funds do, but what more important project for $15 million could you spend? >> i don't understand that either. if you're going use public money, use it for a monument on washington's mall. >> david rubenstein gave that money. become an important philanthropist. >> you guys betting again? >> no. >> very generous to monticello.
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>> really? we get dwayne wade's autograph. >> d-wade. >> "the dallas morning news". if you were one of the 70 million americans that purchased the so-called barefoot shoe -- >> i'm sorry, those things are gross. >> disgusting. you may be entitled to some cash. vibram, the manufacturer of the shoes, settled a class action lawsuit. the odd looking shoes were marketed to, quote, improve health. but it is not rooted in science. customers can get a partial refund. you guys, that's just not right. you don't do that. even if it helps your feet. just don't do it. >> 2011 i go to the white house correspondents dinner and there wearing a tux, ruffled shirt, but a black tux and those shoes.
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mike allen. >> that's right. >> he's got them on right now. >> did he wear those. >> the five fingered shoes they're called for some reason. >> mike, what's going on, man? >> hey, good morning, guys. you never know when news is going to break out. you have to be ready. >> ready to run, mike allen. >> jimmy olson in the five fingered shoed. >> let's talk about tim geithner's book. it's out this week. there's so much to wade through. why did he write it? obviously he wants to shape his legacy a bit, but i heard him say yesterday that he thinks legacy shaping might be long gone at this point. >> that's right. what he does do is take us behind the curtain on a number of fun scenes. secretary geithner was in the west wing a ton because of the financial crisis. so this book hits the streets today. we got a sneak peek, a couple
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fun things in there. he talks about how jake seward told him to see president clinton to get some advice about how to talk like a populist. one of the candid admissions in this book, geithner says never really figured out how to navigate the ceo pay and bailouts. >> i was looking at the politico last night as i often do and i noticed one of the top stories is a respected conservative economist calling kim geithner a liar. tell us about that. >> yes. so this is a dispute that's in the book about what somebody who clearly that geithner did not get a response from before he put the book out. and there's going to be a number of these. there's something also in here about senator mark kirk he may dispute.
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geithner says when he was in china, he went to the chinese and said, don't buy any more american notes. we're running up a deficit. we could default. and geithner had to call china and say you don't do this. you don't say we might default on notes. another person who is a little embarrassed by this book, scott brown. senator from massachusetts now of course running in new hampshire. went in to lobby geithner and said i could probably be with you on your financial plan, but i need an exception to the volcker rule. and he turned to his aide and said, which ones were they again? >> you're talking about gwen hubbard who is the head of the council of economic advisers. and so geithner talks about going to hubbard and talking about simpson bowles.
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when you're ready to raise taxes, there might be a deal here. and he quotes hubbard saying of course we have to raise taxes. hubbard said that's a lie, that never took place. that's the conversation you were talking about there. i believe we have geithner on tomorrow. >> good. >> going to join us on "morning joe" tomorrow. mike allen, thanks so much. good luck with the five fingered shoes. >> have a good week. >> they look good on him. certain guys pull them off. still ahead, a dangerous and effective way to get rid of a pesky black bear that's been in your back yard. >> oh, my. >> we'll explain in news you can't use. plus donald sterling speaks. this time on the record. his take on that rant is next. and vladimir putin hits the ice for a friendly game of hockey. you won't believe how well he did against a handful of russian starts. the matador defense next.
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is donald sterling a racist? >> i have never heard him say racial things. i don't know -- it was horrible
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when i heard it. i mean, it was just degrading and it made me sick to hear it. but as far as a racist, i don't really think he is a racist. >> do you think your husband should apologize? >> absolutely. >> that's donald sterl's wife shelly speaking out on her husband's comments with the fate of the clippers up in the air. he sat down for an interview saying in part, when i listen to that tape i don't know how i can say words like that. i don't know why the girl had me say those things. i was baited. i mean, that's not the way i talk. i don't talk about people for one thing ever, i talk about ideas and other things. i don't talk about people. i'm not a racist. i made a terrible mistake. i'm entitled to one mistake after 35 years. i mean, i love my league, my part ners. am i entitled to one mistake? it's a terrible mistake and i'll never do it again. >> oh, yes, he will.
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he made another statement in that. >> yeah. she made him do. action on the court. the thunder dominating the clippers for most of game four in l.a. the clips mount a comeback. capping a 12-2 run. less than two minutes to play now. clippers down one. jamal crawford knocks down the three. l.a. gets its first lead of the game. okc had a chance in the final seconds. russell westbrook's three no good. the tipback neither. the clippers hang on 109-99. that's a huge win. the series now even 2-2 as they head back. the pacers also -- excuse me -- won yesterday to take a commanding series of the wizards game five in indiana. tomorrow the nets host miami in game four. and the blazers try to get on the board against the spurs and avoid being swept in their own arena. finally russia could have used him during the olympics. vladimir putin suited up for the
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night hockey league festival. >> how do you think he's going to do? >> where's the "d," one asks? >> oh, my gosh. can you believe how good he is? >> oh, the wrister with the goalie diving in the opposite direction of the shot. how about this line? putin holds six goals and five assists. here's your final. team putin won 21-4. >> wow. this guy can do everything, can't he? >> wow. >> when on harold's team, you should see that. >> you play hockey? >> a lot. >> i bet you do. mika's must read opinion pages are next. we'll be back on "morning joe." ♪
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time now for to the must read opinion pages. at 46 past the hour. let's do "the wall street journal." their editorial board writes this. obama's power lament towards the end of his speech last week mr. obama declared i have this remarkable title right now. president of the united states. and yet every day when i wake up, i think about young girls in nigeria or children caught up in the conflict in syria. and there are times in which i want to reach out and save those kids. and having to think through what levers, what power do we have at any given moment. i think drop by drop by drop that we can erode and wear down these forces that are so destructive. mr. obama seemed to be saying to his liberal audience that his heart is in the right place, that he really cares about the victims in syria and nigeria yet he as the commander in chief of the u.s. armed forces could do
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something about both, moral sentiments after the fact are nice, but they are no substitute for u.s. military power. >> you can almost hear the wringing of hands as barack obama makes those statements. >> you can. you can also, i think, hear that he's being realistic. and he is probably -- he overshares in public. >> he did overshare. >> but as ever, we overcorrect. it was not hard to find a substantial number of folks from 2001 until 2009 who wanted a president who would acknowledge complexity. now we have a president who overly acknowledges complexity. we have gone from one extreme to the other. but i think to some extent, the president's being kicked around on this stuff unreasonably. because mull tear power, do we
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really after the last eight years, do we really want the first question to be what can our military power do to change the world? >> no. also, david ignatius, some would suggest we don't want it to be the very last question we always answer the same to which is no, no, no, no. i suspect ten years from now there are going to be a lot of people wondering why an administration that actually has an ambassador to the united nations who won a pulitzer on the world standing by on the balkan crisis is part of an administration that stood by while 150,000 syrians have been slaughtered. my god. >> it must be anguishing for samantha power having written those words about genocide to be
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able to effectively do nothing on syria. i think the challenge for obama that i hope he'll address in the next two years is how does the united states project power in a period where we're not going to send armies as we did to iraq and afghanistan. the default answer can't be to do nothing. which is so often what he's done. there has to be another kind of answer that the united states as a great power gives. i wrote the other day, ought to say less and do more. >> david ignatius, thank you so much. still ahead this morning, senior white house adviser valerie jarrett joins us in our 8:00 hour with details on the president's new initiative that could have big implications for the economy. >> keystone? >> but first, a routine traffic stop that turns out to be anything but routine. news you can't use is next. >> what happened here? oh, my lord! ♪
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that's my phone. hey. [ female announcer ] the x1 entertainment operating system. only from xfinity. tv and internet together like never before. ♪ all right. i hope you guys are ready for this. it is a monday edition of news you can't use. >> i look forward to this. do you have any news you can't use from new hampshire involving
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bears and bulldogs? >> oh, my god. yes. look at this. a pair of bulldogs in new hampshire not interested in sharing they back yard. pets charging a black bear who was snacking on some birdseed. now, apparently the bear had been visiting this property for years but this was the first time the dogs had been allowed out. look at that. the homeowner says the dogs are safe. the bird feeder, that's been taken down. so snack time is over. >> look at that. >> if you're looking for a flawless way to get out of traffic and being pulled other to get out of the ticket -- >> 128. i need officers to respond. >> all right. so this all happened in iowa. >> he was getting a ticket.
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>> the police officer's on the window. you can seed the back of his police jersey there lit up by the headlights. but both the officer and the driver were not seriously hurt. the driver was pulled over for driving without her headlights on. now, the good news, she didn't get a ticket. the bad? the car was totalled. >> that's a tree limb. big tree limb. >> talk about bad timing. zblex time she should just cry. >> no bear we know of. >> chased the bear up the tree. it all comes together. coming up, surprising poll numbers on key mid taerm races are just out this morning. chuck todd, sam stein, and bill kristol up next on "morning joe." blap ♪
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♪ i love this. welcome back to "morning joe." boys. >> can we just say we don't do data around here. okay? >> we have a lot of data in here. this looks interesting. jon meacham, harold ford jr. still with us. joining us bill kristol and in washington senior political editor and white house correspondent for "the huffington post," sam stein.
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and nbc news chief white house correspondent chuck todd. >> we have a lot to dig through, new polls to dig through. but before we do that, you were on this yesterday. marco rubio before you. he talked about climate change. we had a debate about what he was saying. let's roll that clip. >> oh, they have to now -- because that was the third one in. we have to stretch. >> no hold on. i told them beforehand we're going to the climate change clip. i could just do this. you were on yesterday with marco there. okay? i've already had this planned ahead of them. we've got a clip we're going to go to it on climate change. go there now. >> how big a threat is climate change? >> i don't believe with the motion scientists are putting out there that somehow there are impacts we could take today that will have an impact on our climate. >> let me get this straight. you do not think human activity has caused warming to our
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planet? >> i do not believe human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way the scientists are portraying it. and i do not believe the laws we propose we pass will do anything about it except destroy our economy. >> let me ask you because we've got another republican on the set and it feels good. >> i like to show up every couple of weeks. >> you know you come to visit me. >> i do. joe thinks i come to visit him. that's generally the case with this show. people come to visit you and joe thinks they come to visit him. >> you think i'm dumb? i'm not dumb. i know. i know. couple things. do you agree with me that there is climate change, first of all. >> there certainly was warming for much of the 20th century. >> do you think -- >> climate change has done.
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>> hold on. you wanted to hear from republicans. >> i do. and he's making a normal answer. >> i think he agrees with me that humans have attributed, but how much have we contributed is e the main question. >> sure it's a debate. >> i think the practical question going forward really is what can we do, what should we do, how much should we spend. slowing down the economy on this is the issue. i'm with marco rubio on that. the recent proposals wouldn't do that much about climate change in the next 20 years. at real cost to the economy. >> why was he doing that dance? >> yao got an excellent tv show here. you should have him here. >> he's too afraid to say the truth. >> the base does not care -- >> does the base even -- i have gone -- >> the base does not want the u.s. economy shut down. they don't care about debates
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about how much it's contributed in the 1950s or '80s. >> are you for a carbon tax in exchange for the keystone pipeline? would you be for something like that? part of the problems is we've allowed businesses to pollute for free. i think in fairness of talking about how al gore -- >> let me answer this. not in turn for the keystone pipeline. i think that should be approved on its own merits. but we have a tax system now that burdens labor and the middle class and working class. president obama's talked about this. but no one wants to do anything about it. the payroll tax is looking at the system as a whole. and it's a pretty hefty tax. it's not a progressive tax. and if you replace that with some form of carbon tax, i'd be up to that. >> i want to blow up a belief that was stated around this table last hour that all republicans are climate change deniers. i've talked about this story
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with very conservative people and they're with me. if a republican goes in and says in the process i believe in climate change, i believe we have contributed to climate change. i'm not exactly sure how much we have and i'm not willing to shut down the economy on it, but if there are good ideas and we have science that we need to move on it, i'd be glad to make those discussions. but i'm not just going to jump because al gore me tells me i can jump. >> and it is startling in the last 20 years, the warming has seemed to stop. i look forward to you saying this in new hampshire. >> stop it. he will not be doing that. >> i don't think climate change denier is going to be rewarded in the primary process. >> to be fair, i'm not sure that's what rubio is exactly saying. >> i wasn't saying that he was. >> he didn't answer the, really.
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he did his little careful dance and then you when we were discussing it went all the way to the al gore part of it. >> because i love america. . especially in the senate where the balance of power -- >> this is so interesting. >> -- the election may not be as rough for democrats as previously believed, mika. >> a new nbc marist poll looks at three races. arkansas, georgia, and kentucky. in all three states the president's approval is below the national average. >> terrible. >> kentucky and arkansas, it's in the 30s. and his signature health care law isn't doing much better. at least 50% say it's a bad idea in all three states. and while those are bad numbers for the democratic party in general, you'd think, it's not necessarily hurting the party's candidates. >> let's start in arkansas. chuck todd, mark pryor up 11 according to this polls. there are some they have him up two or three points.
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but some other polls showing mark pryor holding on. i'll be the first to admit this is a big surprise to me. what's going on in that state? >> surprise to me too. i think you look at two numbers. number one, mark pryor is winning a third of obama disapproval voters. >> how's he doing that? >> well, i think it's because he's identified himself as mark pryor. not as democrat mark pryor, number one. number two, i think that arkansas if you look at it, arkansans give bill clinton a 70% positive rating. already they're able to separate democrats -- arkansas democrats into one column away from national cldemocrats. then the third number that tells me that maybe in this fix when you watched his come pain, i don't think cotton has run a
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good campaign so far. it's basely 1-1. and that tells you he hasn't done a good job of defining himself. a lot of people said just get on the ballot. mark pryor will fold like a cheap suit. it will be done. and i think that's a part of this is mark pryor simply campaigns matter. that's what this poll shows. they simply matter. you look at the republican side, arguably on the governor's race, hutchison has been running a better campaign and he's upset him. >> we had tom cotton on. following what's been going on. i was impressed with the guy, but what's happening in arkansas? >> i think chuck's right. campaigns matter. mass uf buys attacking cotton on medicare and on liberal attacks on conservatives which if not responded to could have some
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effect. and i think they have had some effect. i think other groups will come in and negate that. will be a good strong republican state and a good republican year. so i would bet on cotton you can't assume there is a tie. harry reid is one tough politician. if you look at what his pack is doing, they have been the most effective spender in this cycle. he's just got married. he doesn't really understand what it's like to be a 62-year-old who might be in danger of losing his job and is worried about medicare. >> interesting. chuck, in kentucky, senate minority leader mitch mcconnell neck and neck with allison lundergan grimes.
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>> is you just get the feeling that we're still going to be either unless a debate blows it open and grimes underperforms or something else happens, we try to figure out who's going to win that one. >> this is about do the anti-republican voters stay home or vote grimes? right now a lot of them are sitting in the grimes column or undecided. what happens to them at this point. they're going to vote against mcconnell in the primary. the mcconnell folks know this is the game. right now they don't seem to have any interest in supporting mcconnell in either campaign. so where do they go? can mcconnell convince them to come home? i mean, you could look at this poll and say mcconnell's up a point. he's in big trouble. or you could say he sat here,
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he's been focusing on the republican primary. his numbers among conservatives are actually pretty good now compared to where they were a year ago. so the campaign that's in front of him, he's doing a good job with. and once he starts focusing on grimes, watch out. that's the other unknown about her. she's basically been able to fly under the radar while mcconnell has been worried about a primary. >> that's a great question. and i have not talked in shock about grimes. so the characterization i'm about to make does not apply to him. but i'm sure he's heard the same thing i've heard. this race is close in kentucky against the top republican in the senate despite the fact that a lot of national reporters that have gone to kentucky say she is not a good candidate. she is stiff. she is programmed. you get her beyond her talking points, she's not effective.
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you can tell she hasn't run a big race before. and you look at that one or two ways. but if you were a republican, i would say, jeez, hopefully mitch can hammer her when they're one on one. but why is mcconnell so close to this -- why is this even a race if she's really as challenged on the trail as a lot of national reporters tell me she is? >> well, i haven't been to kentucky and haven't seen her so i can't comment on that. but i agree with chuck's comments. they feel like a lot of that bevin camp will come back. >> -- the cockfight before he gets the bevin vote? >> that's not like the smartest political move, but it's odd that the senate race has desc d descended into the debate of
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attendance into cockfighting. >> we bring it up every day here. >> but it's going to be a tough race for the democrats anyway. it's a tough state for the democrats. obviously she has a lot of outside money coming in because people are intrigued by this. but in the end, it comes down to will those dis-affected bevin supporters come back and vote for mcconnell? you'd have to imagine in a contest between her and mcconnell, they will choose mcconnell. it's not as rosy as these poll numbers suggest for democrats. >> maybe not. they do have a matchup, the same poll has a matchup between them. >> two things. cru kristol, i'd love your reaction to this. governor bah sheer was able to make this thing work better. clinton won that state two times. i think mcconnell is a stronger candidate. i know allison and she's far
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more in than people give had her credit. than say some of the experiences in other states? could that be one of the factors in kentucky? >> it could be. but mcconnell's been there a long time. and i think he overcomes that probably ultimately in the general. but having a primary if you're on incumbent is bad news. i don't think primaries necessarily hurt a party when it's an open seat. i think they like to see it a competition. and the party unites behind him. but if you're an incumbent, we talk about arkansas. voters see a primary challenge that's kind of credible against a sitting senator, if you're on independent voter you tend to think, i don't know. people in his own party don't really want him? you know? so i think the challenge of bevin even though i don't think he'll beat mcconnell will be
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important. i also think allison grimes is underrated. she seems to be an attractive candidate. >> let's go to georgia. michelle nunn, her numbers seen here on the right side show she is holding her own against all candidates in the crowded gop primary. what do you mach ke of that chu? >> you look at this poll and nationally republicans are relieved that the top two that have been in our poll in the republican primary are not phil gingrey or paul broun. david perdue, jack kingston, they look like the two headed to the runoff. which means the establishment doesn't -- means the national
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party doesn't have to go in there and bail somebody out. they let the two of them fight it out on their own. i don't think they care that much which one they get. they feel either one of them is more electable than michelle nunn. to bring it back to kind, i've had many national democrats say kentucky would be over if michelle nunn were the nominee in kentucky. >> bill, obama carries virginia twice, north carolina once. georgia, kentucky are different in that georgia's not quite as southern anymore because of atlanta. does that make it more critical if. >> i don't know. georgia will be a tough year. i think karen handel could make
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the run. one of the under-reported stories this year is republicans look like they're getting a pretty good field in the general elections. but also younger in many cases. younger candidates who are well qualified aren't going to make foolish mistax either. you see them coming together in most of these states. >> you don't see any of these candidates trying to redefine rape in the general election. >> that would be nice not to have that. it'd be nice to go a whole six months without that. >> you know, gingrey did it, but it doesn't look like he's going to get it. >> thank you. still ahead on "morning joe," white house senior adviser valerie jarrett and philadelphia
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mayor michael nutter. and later this hour, fast company was named magazine of the year by the national magazine awards. editor bob safan is here. and someone who is not on that list, roger bennett. >> he should be. >> no. he'll be here with the football frenzy. up next, as secretary eric shinseki prepares to testify about the coverups at the va, is there a way for the white house to clean up? army veterans standing by. >> here's bill kairns. he has a look at the forecast first. >> have you seen colorado? look at the live pictures out of the denver area? just the fact that a lot of us have turned our acs on and cranking them up. it's snowing this morning in denver. it's a late season snow. it's happened before, but just for the rest of us it's shocking. it snowed about 10 inches in
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cheyenne. it's snowing not just in denver. widespread into nebraska at this point. it will end this morning. couple inches. it will melt quickly. middle of the country, chance of severe weather. maybe a tornado or two iowa into missouri. but a heavy rain threat is what i'm watching. could get 3 to 5 inches of rain in the next 48 hours. look at monday's forecast. a lot of areas in the east with a chance of a stray shower or afternoon thunderstorm. we're definitely in the summer-type weather pattern. we're going to cool things off in the great lakes in the days ahead. still a warm, humid tuesday. then all our attention will focus out west. a big heat wave for california. and of course that fire danger and drought. this becomes a bigger and bigger story every time i show you a forecast like this. more "morning joe" when we come back. ♪ ♪
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well, there's no one who understands accountable more than shinseki. >> does he have your support? >> i do support general shinseki. but there's no margin here. if this, in fact, or any variation of this occurred all the way along the chain, accountability is going to have to be upheld here. because because we can never let this kind of outrage -- if all of this is true -- stand in this ko country. >> chuck hagel with his support for eric shinseki. secretary shinseki will testify this week on capitol hill as congress investigates the growing scandal where up to 40 veterans died. with us here now combat veteran wes moore. and director of iraq and afghanistan war veterans of
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america, paul reicoff. thank you. >> general shinseki served his country admirably a lot of people respect him. but i think everybody has been patient through the backlog crisis. they've been patient through one scandal after another. hi showed up at an agency that was broken but sure as hell hasn't fixed it. how does he not get fired for what went on in phoenix? why is he still there? why does chuck hagel continue to defend him? why do people continue to defend him? >> that's the question everybody in america is asking right now. i come on your show every couple of months really and talk about a new problem with the va. this one cuts to the core of america's trust with the va. if people are cooking the books and it's systemwide. >> and killing veterans.
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>> even if the allegations in phoenix aren't true, the va has admitted 23 others have died waiting. this started in phoenix. this ft. collins, cheyenne, st. louis. and later today there'll be another one. and we're continuing to get e-mails from va employees, from our member who is are frustrated and outraged. it keeps going on. >> this just isn't new. >> that's right. it's not a new story. >> people asked me whenever i would go to town hall meetings, if irs is screwing somebody a congressman can get a response with the irs. you know who doesn't call me back, the only agency that doesn't call me back, the va because they don't give a damn. that was 20 years ago. it's still the case. >> there's a culture of stone walling. >> it's the slow roll, man. >> it is. and they wade out the political appointees. and really calcified this broken culture. but shinseki hasn't been able to
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fix it. we had high hopes for him, but he couldn't. we have to figure out how deep does this run and can he even fix it? >> and you have to look at the level of care that veterans are receiving. because as warfare has changed, the injuries have changed. there are many more men and women coming home with long-term injuries and brain injuries and the va seems like it's stuck in a time warp or something. >> i tell you, mika, why this is so heart breaking right now is all these scandals and these things are taking place while we still have men and women overseas fighting. what happens 10 or 15 years from now when these men and women are only 40 years old? if we have all these problems now, what happens when the wars are not front mind of the american population? >> the va i was talking about was in 2000, 2001 before we had a decade of war. this is going to get tougher. we always have a guy at the helm who doesn't know what he's
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doing. >> everyone understands hospitals make mistakes and bureaucracy makes mistakes. the degree to -- this is taken to a new level now because of the apparently systemwide falsification of records. purposeful misleading. isn't that right? i think if you get to that -- look, you can preside over a not confident bureaucracy, but it's been broken for quite a while. if you're presiding over a system that in place after place is cooking the books, as you said, that's a whole different story. >> and congress has a role to play here too. there are plenty people on the va committee that have been soft on these people. chairman miller on the house side has been strict. but bernie sanders has not. he's got to come out strong on thursday, get to the bottom of this. and he has to tell us why this has been going on so long. this is about the entire federal government and congress failing our veterans. >> sam stein?
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>> i just wanted to jump in on that point. what can congress do legislatively? i get they're going to look sbiet and hold hearings on this. but that seems to be the response to every va scandal which is you hold hearings and talk to people and then nothing gets done. what practical steps could congress actually make? what legislation should they consider? do they create their own select committee to look into something like this. >> we support a va accountability act that would empower the va to actually fire people. it's really hard to do right now. that's just one piece of this. we also have a comprehensive piece of suicide prevention in it. once they get done banging their chest in front of the hearing, they need to move something through. >> let's get jeff miller to come on the show and we'll talk about it. because he is fighting on the house side. >> try to get the secretary on and i don't think you will which is a part of the problem.
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this can zal went on for days before he did a single interview. what other cabinet secretary could have this scandal and hide from the public this long? >> we had jim miklaszewski on last week. he says he respects shinseki, but even he said it doesn't seem like guy gets it, just how bad it is. >> also just that accountability has to mean something. the veterans community has been looking for some type of response, some type of reaction. some type of emotion behind this entire thing. and repeatedly there just has not been the level of responsiveness or concern that the veterans community has earned. >> wes moore, thank you. >> thank you, guys. really appreciate it. the next installment of coming back with wes moore airs on pbs. still ahead whob are the most creative in the business?
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fast company has that. plus the person the secret service agents were spent to protect. next on "morning joe." ♪ predicting the future is a pretty difficult thing to do. but, manufacturing in the united states means advanced technology. we learned that technology allows us to be craft oriented. no one's losing their job. there's no beer robot that has suddenly chased them out. the technology is actually creating new jobs. siemens designed and built the right tools and resources to get the job done.
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the secret service is once again drawing attention this time for reportedly diverting assets from the white house to protect the personal friend and director of the agency. >> that's just not a good thing. >> that's not good. >> hey, i'll be home in a second. do we help the president stay safe or tommy boy? well, you know, tommy did get -- >> the case dates back to two months in 2011 when agents were sent to a rural area of maryland. it was known as operation moonlight. and the agents from the prowler unit who patrolled the white house grounds were reportedly told mark sullivan was concerned his assistant was being harassed by her neighbor. for its part, the secret service has opened an investigation. >> sounds legit to me. my god. >> and acknowledged --
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>> who are these men? >> it's human resources. >> go knock on her door. >> and acknowledged agents performed welfare checks at the woman's home. but a spokesman for the secret service says the prowler unit does not have a specific assignment at the white house adding the patrols in question lasted only a few days and were brief drive bys at the home. just let it breathe, joe. sometimes you don't need to say anything. there can be awkward silence. >> wasn't it like the petraeus story that somebody was calling someone. >> we don't need that. >> this sounds vaguely familiar. >> i feel comfortable talking about the arkansas senate races. >> what's going on here? up next, what do jerry seinfeld, the senior vice president at uber have in
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common? >> they all played a kiss cover band in high school. zblo bob safian is here with the answer. ♪
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how much money do you think you'll need when you retire? then we gave each person a ribbon to show how many years that amount might last. i was trying to, like, pull it a little further. [ woman ] got me to 70 years old. i'm going to have to rethink this thing. it's hard to imagine how much we'll need for a retirement that could last 30 years or more. so maybe we need to approach things differently, if we want to be ready for a longer retirement. ♪
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♪ your kids, where are they on santa claus? >> well, we're jewish. >> i found certain duties fall on certain parents. like my husband is on barf control. i can do it. he's better at it. i'm in charge of feces. all the household feces are my purview. >> i like that in the same sentence. >> that was a clip from the web series "comedians in cars
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getting coffee." the comedian was named one of the 100 most creative people in business by fast company magazine which is award winning. >> it is. >> thank you. thank you. >> that is amazing. joins us on set managing editor bob safian. that was amazing. >> thank you. it was great to see you there. it was a lot of fun. >> it was. talk about who were the 100 most create i have people in business? >> you mentioned jerry seinfeld being one of them. this is one of my favorite features we do. it's a hundred people who we have never written about before. that's the idea. this is showing the covers of anna kendrick the star of "pitch perfect" who's had a terrific time in the movies and also singing. on social media she has a strong following. >> 2 million or twitter.
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>> things with new ads around the super bowl. one of the things i love on the list, the number one on the list is a saudi princess. >> tell us about her. >> she took over her family's retail business called alpha and she runs a store, a retail store called harvey nichols. what she's done is moving out male salespeople and bringing women into the workforce which is not something necessarily embraced by the culture in saudi arabia. she set up car pooling for women. she's addressing culture. >> that is so cool. >> look at that shot if we can zoom in. saudi arabia, this is a bold move. >> the business is taking a bit of a hit because there are traditionalists objecting but it is the progressive forward-thinking thing that the creative people in business will
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do. >> thomas? >> it seems really fascinating the way you've curated this list. you have paleo-on cocologist in here. >> studying bones to see how cancer developed over time. but there are also the founders of tinder and whisper which i'm sure you use all the time. >> what's whisper? >> it's one of these apps on the social web where you can remain anonymous and can share information with your group or with others remaining anonymous. >> that sounds dangerous. >> okay. so whisper, i think i'm going to check that one out. >> james carnes who is the designer of the new soccer ball for the world cup every four years. there's a new soccer ball
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designed. this one from adidas. it's constantly sort of -- if you look at the history of the soccer balls, there's dramatic changes. >> here's jerry a guy out of 1990 yet here we are 2014 you have him as an innovator. >> 35 million views on sony's crackle network on the web. you know, this is dramatic success for sony. he's also worked closely with acura the advertiser to be able to create content for acura that is constant and fits with the show but that people will pay attention to. it's also helpful for the brand. something you wouldn't necessarily suspect someone from seinfeld to engage in. he feels it's fun and important part of the media. >> uber. >> i'm sure you all use it. the gentleman on here is involved in the marketing of uber, all the different things and techniques you use. >> tell people what it is. >> uber is an app you can use to
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call a car service and it will automatically be paid on your credit card so you feel like you're one of these big deal folks who can just show up and get a car. >> it's between taxis and car service. >> yes. and you can also get suvs. there's a different range of services on your phone. it's simple and an easy thing. >> you've got a friend of "morning joe" here. you got him in a t-shirt. we've never seen that before. >> something called the global poverty project which is really making, helping poor people around the world sexy. engaging and raising both money and impact and attention to these causes. >> you recognize the ceo of beats music. apple buying beats, what's your perspective and opinion of that? >> well, there are reports they're bidding to buy beats. if you look at anything apple does, it's not based on just one thing. it's got to fit into the full
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ecosystem. that's what they're looking at with beats. they have a high quality electronics product that's actually making money. you've got a music service that can allow and help apple music and itunes to develop a streaming service in a more robust way. then you have the talent base of people who they are acquired in the process. >> you also have the creator of "orange is the new black," and director of "frozen." >> yes. and the woman who was the key instigator behind the lego movie. >> everything is awesome. >> very cool. we'll be checking out the latest issue of "fast company." bob safian, great to see you. >> great issue. >> and congratulations on your success. >> thank you so much. >> it's great to see magazines thrive. up next, he has spent -- he's dancing with jen. i swear to god.
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okay. he has spent the past four months -- go jen! -- traveling the world vying to be one of the 23 representing the u.s. at the world cup. roger bennett is here. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ i make a lot of purchases for my business. and i get a lot in return with ink plus from chase like 60,000 bonus points when i spent $5,000 in the first 3 months after i opened my account. and i earn 5 times the rewards on internet, phone services and at office supply stores. with ink plus i can choose how to redeem my points. travel, gift cards even cash back.
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♪ yesterday and what you did will do today and how do you deliver tomorrow? and how you can live with tomorrow. >> a very special welcome to julien. >> jozy altidore with the goal. >> you want the players to take this very seriously. >> it's the last opportunity for a lot of these players. >> i can't control who he picks at the end of the day. i know his job is going to be very tough. but if i can make his job that much tougher, that's all i can do. now with us, our good friend, analyst for espn. roger. >> roger. >> world cup coming up. world cup coming up, man. how are we going to do?
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we're in the bracket of death. >> as you've seen, we've been filming the u.s. team for eight days and filming with my friend john hawk. they've been doing the "hunger game" in cleats. germany number two in the world is a devils hand they've been dealt. it gets worst than just the team, they're playing in rain forest conditions. >> have they ever played in rain forest conditions? >> they've never played in rain forest conditions. >> so they're undefeated there. >> they're undefeated there. >> who's your favorite this year?
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>> for the world cup? >> yeah. >> no european team has ever won in south america. germany looks remarkable. can you never discount the little sort of smurfs from spain. that national anthem will propel them. i'd love to see argentina play them in the final and beat them. >> european teams do not perform in brazil. >> or the european commentators, jay. >> not a happy weekend for either you or me. >> i take no pleasure in your demise. >> i take no pleasure in your team didn't make the top four. everton. looked like two of the four teams were going to be from mercy side in europe. the top four clubs actually go to europe. it's a difference of -- it makes about $100 million pound deference whether you're in the
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top four or not. >> everton came fifth. the league came down to liverpool, plucky liverpool, who are like sea biscuit charging toward the title and imagine sea biscuit falling over in the last run. it isn't pretty. but manchester city -- >> liverpool needed mancini to lose. >> they were already on their vacation, westham. and nasry, how can so many awful traits be in one human being? and the truly wonderful captain of manchester city, captain of this world cup, manchester sfi
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won their second title in three years. cynics would say, joe, this is the most spectacular money of oil money buying sports titles. think of the new york yankees, multiply them by the dallas cowboys. >> it's been ridiculous. they said they're all making 30 million pounds. at some point they'll be policing this. but they bought two championships. except for plucky liverpool, the little engine that could. nobody expected liverpool at the beginning of the season to be in the top five, six or seven. what a season. they collapsed yesterday. and they came back. >> i interviewed john henry and he said liverpool would get a
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top-five place. >> this has scamped the u.a. john henry and tom werner, a sad ending but fantastic what they've done. >> it actually is money ball. it is money ball in england where the last two transfer windows, a lot people wanted them to spend millions and millions and millions, they simply refused. >> they spent it on youth. they had a line on what they would spend, investing it in youth. now they're in europe. will they be able to continue or was it a flash in the pan?
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>> and tomorrow, march to brazil will reair tomorrow. >> usa! usa! >> still ahead, valerie jarrett and mayor michael nutter. guys -- >> what? >> we're switching out something but they just can't hear me. ♪ ♪
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slammed by the new government in kiev along with much of the e.u. and the u.s. washington criticized moscow for
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not doing more to halt the elections and while much of the voting was peaceful, in one town near donetsk, national guardsmen opened fire on a crowd where voting was taking place. now, in other places the air was more festive with russian songs blaring from loud speakers and many hailing the referendum. the backdrop for this voting taking on, david, what does this mean given the fact it was almost rudimentary. >> we don't know. the question they voted on was vague. it said do you support self-rule, do you support a annexation by russia? putin said he would move troops
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back to the border. >> do you think he was saying he wanted it delayed? >> that's been a mystery among the analysts i have talked to. the closest i've heard is when angela merkel came to washington and met with obama, they jointly agreed that if russia was seen to disrupt the may 25 presidential election, not this election, but the big election that's coming in another ten days, that that would be reason for the u.s. and europe to impose serious sanctions on russia and that seems to have gotten putin's attention and led to these more calm, restrained statements last week. they didn't make much difference on the ground. i think we can see going into the may 25 election, russia will now say, look, part of this country has signalled it wants different kind of future so whatever happens we need a
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decentralized ukraine that will be much more pliable for russia in the future. >> david, it also did not stop vladimir putin from going to the crimea and taking a victory lap on a day which is considered one of the most important days in russian history, that is celebration of victory in world war ii. >> you know, joe, i found that frankly a moving and important reminder of how powerfully the past weighs on the shoulders of vladimir putin and most russians. the kind of suffering they experienced in world war ii, what they were remembering on what they call victory day, the importance of crimea for them, are things we need to bear in mind. it was all on display in that visit. we need to understand the motivations of increasingly our adversary in putin. there it was, returning to this
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city that symbolizes russian try to take a victory lap. >> you begin to look around the map and there are some other places you could circle, mo moldova, is probably the most youfs. >> you have moldova. astonia or latvia, that would be a much different kind of
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situation. with putin there's a sense this is ad hoc policy. i'm not sure he knows himself what his next move is. that's what makes it dangerous. >> turning to 2016 politics, if anyone believed marco rubio was still on the fence about seeking office, his latest statement would state the obvious. >> if i decide to run for president, i will not have some sort of exit strategy to run for the president. >> that will be a decision not to -- >> i believe you run for president and you don't run with an eject button if it doesn't work out. >> do you think you're ready to be president? >> i do. i think that's true for many
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people who run. i've served in public office for the better part of 14 years. i think the president has to have a clear vision of where the country needs to go and how to get it there. >> senator rubio also took some shots at his potential 2016 challenger, hillary clinton and her recent record as secretary of state. >> i'm sure she's going to go on bragging about her time in the state department. she's also going to be held accountable for her failures, whether it's the failure with the reset in russia and the failure in benghazi. >> what grade would you give her? >> i wouldn't give her a passing grade. >> you think it's an f? >> yeah. if she's going to have to run for president on her record as secretary of state, she's going
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to have to be responsible for its failures. >> and one left, he also made statements on climate change. rubio says he disagrees with the scientists. >> i don't agree with the notion that people are putting out there, including scientists, that there are action today that could make an impact on our climate. >> you don't believe that -- >> i do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are claiming it. i do not believe the laws passed will do anything, except destroy our economy. >> a lot to take in there with marco rubio.
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what are some of your takeaways? >> he didn't say what he's for and what he wants to do differently. he praised some in his party for having ideas but he really didn't lay out ideas. two, he still comes across as a little boyish, a little youngish, although he says he'll, 43 this month -- >> by the way, he's 14 years -- >> he just turned 44. >> did he? >> yes. >> i'm not saying i'm old or nothing. >> no, but you're older than marco, too, so 43 is a bit youngish for you this week. >> and he talked about hillary clinton's time as secretary of state. he didn't talk about what he would do differently. the first time i heard anything affirmative, romney on your show last week saying i'm for certain
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thing. for people to advance, it just just be "they didn't do, they didn't do." >> well, he did talk about climate change -- >> i didn't mention that because that didn't make any sense to me. >> he said he doesn't think climate change is enough by people so much that it will cost jobs. there are a lot of us that reject that. there are lot of us that believe -- i don't associate
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myself with marcos' point. you can believe there is climate change, as i do and you can believe that human activity has played a significant role, as i do, without believing that we need to adapt job-killing regulatio regulations. >> he didn't say what you said. >> no, he didn't. >> without believing we have to go in right now and adapt job killing regulations that will put even more working class americans out. i would get you agree. >> i fully agree. >> there are variations of that but, damn it, if you don't agree there's climate change, if al gore is right that florida is going to be underwater in 46, 45 years now, then you're not a true believer and you don't love science. i reject that. >> what i find interesting about that whole part of the argument is exactly why it is that the
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base of the republican party seems to feel so alienated from the science. what is it in the climate south carolina to speak, that means -- that suggests that you can't come to a conclusion that human activity is helping drive this and that we have to confront it. not with a particular bill that's on the table this second. i'm not saying you vote for this or you go to hell, but what is it right now that puts the scientific community so far beyond the pale for republicans? >> john, i don't think it's science. i know it's not science any more than democrats like paul krugman are repulsed by math, they reject it on trying to save social security and medicaid for americans for years to come. but on this issue, i think speaking of tell advantage liev
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think they overplayed their hand. 2004, 2005, 2006, americans were bought in to climate change and that we need to move aggressive of it. since that time, since the overreach, since there were the climate versions of the salem witch trials where if you didn't believe in the most extreme view, that you were anti-science, not only did republicans wander away from this issue but check the polling, most americans began walking away from this issue. they overplayed it. >> would you say rubio has a ration response? i would argue it's overreach. >> that's an overreach as well obviously playing to the base and not reality. >> first of all, we talk about
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republicans, republicans. we'll let marcos' words stand on their own. i think a lot of republicans might agree with marcos, going against this extremism i was talking about before. i haven't seen polls on this but certainly most of the republicans i talk to believe there is climate change, they are smart enough to believe that 7 billion, 8 billion people have a huge impact on it, especially what's happening in china. china is the number one producer of damage to the environment now. but they're not willing to just start shutting down factories and changing the way america does things tomorrow to throw millions and millions of people out of work. i think there's some subtlety there. up. >> get the sense that, yes,
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republicans who des agree with this point of view do disagree but they also resent getting hit over the head with it and saying fall in line -- >> you're anti-science. >> you get that this is reaction to that reaction from al gore. if you look at where climate change falls in people's concerns, for all the attention it gets and it's important for the long term, voters don't really care about it. that's not going to hurt rubio at all. that position he took, while it may be offensive to a lot of people is not going to hurt him in a primary. >> al gore but for some of his comments, we wouldn't have the hybrid industry and the mileage that we have. the number one emitter is
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farming in our country, though he did overreach -- >> i'm not bashing al gore here. listen -- and i said this to him. he was a televangelist for climate change. i think there have to be those people that are out there that are pushing hard and go as hard as they can go in one direction or another. i'm really glad he did it and drew a lot of attention to that. i personally believe he did overreach. >> that reporter didn't overreach in this questioning. why are we talking about al gore? it was someone more substantial, i think we should go on but it was marco rubio overplaying to the base. i believe we wee should go -- >> what, if he would agree with you? >> no.
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in order to defend him you have to loop all the way around to al gore and extremism. it was a long road to defend him. good look. it took you five minutes to explain why marco rubio was okay in his answering and it wasn't. >> a lot of us believe the left have overreached on this issue and we're not going to throw people out of work because of their ideological rampages. >> it's not out of line for rubio to say republicans are now overreaching the other way. >> coming up, a big new partnership between the city and a magazine. and the white house thinks they've found their secret weapon for getting their message out for the mid-term elections. but first, bill karins with the
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weather. bill. >> have i a heat wave on the west coast, a snowstorm in colorado and flooding that will affect areas of texas this week and we're wrapping up a tornado outbreak. this tornado was right overthe top of it, this guy was safely in the distance, not too farp away. you can see how wide it was. it want a classic tornado. you can tell the winds were mighty strong and flying in a circle, some of that debris. 35 tornadoes yesterday, the big one in nebraska, they were saying was a half mile long last night was mostly over rural areas, which is why we got away from no fatalities and no injuries. and it is still snowing in
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denver with a wind chill of 25 degrees. here we are heading into the middle of may, up to a foot of snow on the ground in cheyenne, wyoming. chicago had some nasty storms yesterday. you could get a few more than. and san antonio, you're going to get drenched. that's a flooding threat there in texas. and even storms late today in new york and d.c. as it's feeling very summer-link and very humid. look at these live pictures from denver. wow. good luck with that. it will melt soon. you're watching "morning joe." >> call on me, come and see me, i'm the same boy i used to be ♪
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here with us now, white house senior adviser valerie jarrett on set. >> it's such a pleasure seeing you live rather than looking through a black hole. >> a lot easier this way. let's talk about the working families. this is a big deal. >> it is a big deal. president obama is hosting first ever summit on working families. now that more than half of hour workforce is half women, we have
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to make sure the environment reflects the environment -- >> i was listening to poll numbers, there are more working moms in the midwest because of different reasons there, demographically in school systems and more female bread winners, believe it or not in south dakota. you'd think it would just be the big cities with these changing dynamics. >> no, it's all over the country now. a woman's contribution to the family income is more important than ever before. so we want to share best practices and i'm here in new york today because we're having a series of regional forums around the country to get programs we can take to scale, employers who are really understanding in order to be globally competitive, they need to be flexible, they need to pay equally, to have benefits. >> and retain women. >> you can get them in the door but if you don't create an
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environment that's supportive of the family dynamics, of the demands of senior citizens that are now living often times with their children, you're not going to be able to retain people. you change people for a few years and they're like i can't do this anymore. >> exactly and burnout. >> in terms of single-income households where females are the income earner, you have the wage disparity. >> the overall goal of the president is to make sure everyone has an equal opportunity. issues about day care and early childhood education. we did a survey recently that found within a three-month period, 29% of working parents had a child care crisis. well, what happens if you've got to leave in the middle of the
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day? if you're a low-wage worker and you leave, you could lose your job. you're certainly going to get docked for the day's work. what can the employers do to make sure they can retain that talent. sometimes women are dropping out of the workforce because they can't make it work. as the president likes to say, when women succeed, america suc succee succeeds. >> how much of this is modelling corporate practice and how much is legislate of? >> it's not either or, it's both and. we want to highlight practices around the country where they have evidence that it's making companies more profitable, they're retaining talent, they have less turnover and let's look at more what we can do. the president signed an
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executive order requiring all federal contractors to not discriminate or retaliate against employees for sharing pay. we've been calling on congress to pass a similar bill that would affect all employers. there are steps we can take legislatively but we want to show what we can do. >> i'm working with some companies next friday, censure, bank of america, all of them are working on a business model to ensure women stay, which is something new. back when i was having little children, most of my friends quit because they made as much in a week as it did to pay a baby -- it made no sense for them to stay at work. >> exactly, it cost more to pay for day care. what you're finding is people
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are much more demanding and they will hop to another place. employers are understanding in or to be competitive -- you can work for a company through technology. you can work anywhere in the world. this is not a political issue. this is an issue about what you're going to do to be globally competitive. many in the private sector do understand it and are putting in place best practices but many of lagging behind. the goal is to put the spotlight on the issue and give policies and programs that have been put in place in both the private and public sector that enhances it.
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>> and there are partners, aetna, they looked at it and put measures in practice -- >> that's why under the affordable care act that providing preventive care was so important. women often put themselves last. if you make preventive care for women, whether it's screening for cancer or contraception -- >> that move will pay you back but not for a long time. and same with these companies. aetna had put these policies in place and literally it did make their business grow and it affected profits. so there's a reason to do this that goes beyond just being a good citizen and doing the right thing and being nice to women. i mean, come on. >> it's good for the bottom lien. as you'll find in the private sector, that's the real
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motivation. that's what we really want to highlight. >> thank you for having the summit. i'm invites myself there. >> oh, no, she's invited. this is something we've talked about, what more can we do to get women to stay in the workforce and thrive -- >> so we -- >> you two, you have to demonstrate what you bring to the table. >> eleanor roosevelt can vouch for us. >> joe is part of his because of how supportive he's been of mika and the folks here at msnbc. >> valerie, thank you so much. it's good to see you. and this weekend is my know your value women's conference. gayle king is going to be the
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key note speaker. you won't want to miss my show. we've picked five women who will compete on stage live, pitch off for a $10,000 bonus. they will pitch me and tell me why in two minutes or less they deserve a bonus. >> that is terrific. >> joe will be a celebrity judge. it's all up to me, believe me. it's going to be so excited. $10,000 bonus right there, just pitch it. women have to put it on the table and say what their value is and learn what they have to do and join it. coming up next, forbes magazinemagazine showcasing the talent in the country. next on "morning joe."
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where did i see you? forbes editor randall lane. >> you want me to get where this was? >> probably in d.c. for the correspondents dinner. >> everything's all a blur. from the working family summit to the know your value summit to the under 30 summit in philadelphia. tell us about it. >> we're excited. this partnership is about to be formally announced in philadelphia but we have to be here first. philadelphia is a hot town. greatest number of young millenniums, growth of any population of any city in america. >> that's so cool. >> it's very exciting. i'm hoping to be able to attend some of the eventing for under 30 certainly. >> you're not allowed in. you're not allowed in. i want to get to the editor of forbes in a second. is it because of philly's
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growing popularity? >> we're a city of first. we are experiencing this huge explosion of population, especially in the millennials, we support entrepreneurship, i.t., all of these sectors are growing in philadelphia. we're excited. >> and all the exception things these days, randall lane, are done by kids. seriously. talk about feeling old, even thomas feels old. >> i do. i'm getting a fake i.d. >> we're talking about 50-year time horizons. when you type in forbes into google is forbes 30 under 30.
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we had 8 million page views in just the first week we put it up. this is becoming a phenomenon. we're bringing together over 1,000 of these game changers, people who are changing the world right now. this is one of the most influential audiences can you find. they are going to run the country for the next 50 years. they're doing right now, multi-billion companies by the hundreds. >> 23 years old, co-founded snapchat? >> and he turned -- evan spiegel turned down $3 billion. they offered him $3 billion for a company with no revenue and he turned it down. he said i don't want to sell out for one-time small pay day. when $3 billion is your one-hit pay day, you know we've had a paradigm shift. >> but is there heat on this for
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snapchat to dissipate when he didn't act on something like this. >> that's what's so exciting about this is these people are truly disrupting, they're coming up with ideas that people, frankly, who are older -- can't think of because they're digital thinkers. we have 15 different categories. 30 under 30 is under 30 in 15 different categories. we've done it for three years. it's over a thousand of the most disruptive people coming. >> and maria sharapova finds herself almost reinventing herself where she is in her business model going forward. >> these are people who think entrepreneurially. it's not just what she's doing on the court and it's not just endorsements. 20 years ago with a game like
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that and a face like that, it would just have been endorsements. she wants to be an entrepreneur. that's what she's coming to philly for. >> this is innovation going on all across america. we're exciting to be hosting this kind of event and activity. it really is a spread of a different mindset. again, this partnership, philadelphia, if you want to talk about revolution, few folks have an idea that will create a country. it's the first startup right in philadelphia. >> i would have thought all of them would have been 29 1/2. 21 years old? palmer luckey. >> palmer just sold the facebook for $2 billion, his occulus, the
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virtual reality goggles. you had to have things like revenue and profits ten years ago. now an idea can be so powerful that you can create billions with the power of your mind. >> mayor, i want to ask you about the minimum wage. >> sure. >> thank you for doing what you did. you raised it for city workers, how much? >> it goes to $10.88 and then it goes to $12 and we'll add a cpr to that every year. >> tell me about the dramatic economic ramifications of that. you will lose so many jobs and have such trouble with that, wouldn't you? >> no. we think that -- fortunately many of our contractors are already paying more than the minimum wage. if philly it's called a living wage created by one of our city
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council members. i've partnered with him. we have a number of first tier contractors, the contractors of our contractors. we want to raise their wages. i inequality -- >> this is 78 cents over what the government's is. how do you leap over? >> we have 150% of the state or federal minimum wage. we're already at 10.88. there a number of workers who were not covered. weep have a ballot initiative sponsored by the councilman that will come up next tuesday to cover all those workers. i wanted to get a jump start on, it work with the councilman and add by executive order, we can direct what our contractors pay and by executive order i'm taking that to $12 an hour -- >> that's great.
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if thes wou white house needs a market city, philadelphia can provide it. >> we think it's time as the city, as our workforce moves through the tail end of this great recession that others at the lower income scale they need to be boosted and we need to lift them up. you have to lead by example. i'm hoping other employers will follow our lead and look in its of their workers and see where they might able to raise some folks up and help lift them out of poverty. >> mayor michael nutter which look to me to doing the right thing but not to many.
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>> make your apartment work for you. >> uh-oh. also, one of oreo's largest competitors is about to stage a comeback? what would be a competitor to oreo? double stuff? >> that would be an inside job right there.
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that violence in the region escalates through western europe and brings everybody down and that fear trade right now. it looks like the former. you mentioned airbnb. they're saying they want to look into airline tickets and dinner reservations. you said who might be a competitor to oreo. >> right. >> remember hydrox? >> yeah. >> they went away in 2002. kelloggs got rid of them and they are making a comeback. >> they were the original ones that predated oreos. >> i think oreo copied them and took control of the market and then hydrox went away. double stuff oreo, that want oreo. that was just a double oreo. >> i know, i had a bad experience with double stuff.
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>> can we share? >> can we hear the story? >> similar to nutella. i ate a whole box of just the double stuff inside and then i broke out in hives all over. >> one would. >> by the way, guys, i loved your interview with philadelphia mayor michael nutter. i'm going to get in trouble for saying this. philadelphia is better than new york in restaurants. the hottest restaurants in market, the best chefs are moving to philadelphia. >> philadelphia an unsung hero. >> meacham can come, too. >> my treat with meacham's credit card. >> thank you. up next, the very effective argument congressman trey gowdy is making why democrats should back off the argument that
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republicans are benefiting off the benghazi investigation. keep it right here on "morning joe." cars are driven by people. they're why we innovate. they're who we protect. they're why we make life less complicated. it's about people. we are volvo of sweden. on car insurance. everybody knows that. well, did you know that game show hosts should only host game shows? samantha, do you take kevin as your lawfully wedded husband... or would you rather have a new caaaaaar!!!! say hello to the season's hottest convertible... ohhh....and say goodbye to samantha. [ male announcer ] geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more.
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a nigerian extremist group says it will free hundreds of kidnapped school girls in exchange for prisoner detained by the government. new video just released this morning features the terror group's leader, there he is right there, who just last week threatened to sell the children into slavery. a separate video claims to show
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dozens of the girls wearing full veils and praying in an undisclosed location. they were kidnapped from their school back in april. it's 273 girls. we'll be following that story. >> it's still unclear what role, if any, democrats will play in the congressional committee set up to investigate the attack in benghazi. republicans are charging forward. the white house says gop attempts to raise money off the issue proves it's politically motivated. the committee's chairman, congressman trey gowdy, is urging both parties to leave money out of it but telling democrats not to forget their on fund-raising on the past. >> they raised money on katrina and iraq and i will not raise
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money on benghazi and i've asked my colleagues to follow suit. but it would be helpful if our colleagues on the or side of the aisle did not have selective amnesia when it comes to what's appropriate to raise money off of and what is not. >> well, that's actually a very good point. >> well, selective amnesia is at least a universal as opposed to selective political affliction. >> either way i think it's -- i don't know if unethical is the right word. if you are going to criticize a policy, especially that involves people who perished, you don't raise money off of it. i don't think it works. but he's making the point that democrats have done the same thing i guess. >> the only thing both sides are looking at when we get meta about this is the calendar, the election year calendar. what it means for the mid terms and what it means beyond that and how long this can remain in the headlines is a benefit for republicans, regardless of whether they benefit off it or not, which is pretty disgusting. if it remains in the headlines, they have a narrative.
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>> we'll see what happens next on "morning joe." what if anything did we learn today. vo: once upon a time
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rising star. loved her in "pitch perfect." >> what did you learn? >> a lot of great senate races in the old confederacy. trying to see democrats holding on and maybe closer than we thought. >> harold? >> science is important. >> and we'll embrace that going forward. >> and the senate races are more ahead and they're not. >> what did you learn? >> know your value conference this friday in hartford, connecticut. we'll have an incredible pitch contest with women. >> and i learned john is not as good at learning basic tips. we are chipping. all the weight on the front foot, keep this arm, don't break your wrist. just like you, throwing the ball. >> that's the velocity. >> lean on it. i'm leaning, i'm lanning. >> it's "morning joe."
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just right there. keep everything like that. we'll see you tomorrow. >> don't break the wrist. >> some southern comfort for democrats. our new nbc news mayor's poll. and mark pryor defying gravity. and michelle nunn's prospects in georgia. and in eastern ukraine, separatists push for self-rule. and vladimir putin's propaganda power play heats up on the ice. when it comes to foreign policy, everything gets run through the "how did hillary clinton cause this" filter on the right? is it all about fitting her

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