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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  May 20, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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welcome back, everybody, to moore, oklahoma, as we come back to visit what it means for this town one year later after that devastating tornado where 24 people lost their lives as we drill down to talk people lost their lives. as we drill down the talk of some of the figures, nearly 175,000 tons of debris has been hauled away. as you see plaza towers behind me, this school is to reopen coming in the fall. the healing continues here in moore, oklahoma. that's it for "way too early." "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ if we exceed the 14-day measure for scheduling appointments, he says, the front office gets upset. he outlined a way to get around it. when patients called for an appointment, they were not booked into the computer until an appointment came up 14 days after the day.
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that way you're off the bad boys list. >> any incident like this makes me mad as hell. >> your mad as hell face looks a lot like your oh, we're out of orange juice face. maybe you can take a page out of australian describing dog interaction guy. >> they came bounding over. >> now that guy gets things done! >> good morning. it is tuesday, may 20th. another pretty day in new york city. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle. good morning. you look nice today. >> thank you very much. >> analyst steve rattner. i like the suit. >> thank you. >> in washington, associate editor of "washington post" and msnbc political analyst eugene robinson. willie's here too and i can't
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wait for a good talk with dad. >> bill geist is going to be here in the next hour. >> oh, my gosh, willie. this is going to be great. i've taken a brief look at it because i got a sneak peek over the weekend. >> yeah. we slipped you one. we'll talk about it later on. it's me and my dad having awkward conversations. >> your dad, longtime cbs correspondent. apple did not fall far. >> good writer too. >> we have a lot to get to today. we have a scene for you to show you right now. that's one year ago today. as a massive tornado ripped through the town of moore, oklahoma. the f-5 twister left a path of destruction that few towns have ever seen before. we were there the day after last year to witness that devastation. and thomas roberts is back there with how the community is doing one year later. we'll hear from him coming up. plus this is how the new york
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city tabloids covered mayor de blasio's wife's interview with new york magazine. huh? did she say that? >> not at all. >> i didn't think she said that. she said something that was brave and most women think. and true. exactly. we're going to have that story coming up. the mayor's reaction as well. but we begin with a big day for the battle to control the senate. voters will decide which candidates head to the election in key battleground states. mitch mcconnell looks confident against matt bevin. but his democrat alison lundergan grimes who's poised to present a tougher task. she came out swinging at a rally in louisville. >> i am a kentucky woman who my republican colleagues have so generally referred to as an empty dress that seeks to retire
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mitch mcconnell. mitch mcconnell fails to realize that it's labor that has lifted millions out of poverty. as he says no to collective bargaining. as he says no to prevailing wage. you will have someone in the united states senate who says right to work for less is just another name for union busting and i will have none of it. >> okay. for mcconnell, it's not just about keeping his seat in the senate. he's eyeing the role of majority leader should republicans take control. >> there's only one thing we can do about it in 2014. in 2014 you can change the united states senate, make me the offensive coordinator instead of the defensive coordinator. >> very different tone there. gop candidates need six seats to shift the power. >> i say for you women in our
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room, you'll love our republican in oregon. she's a female pediatric neurosurgeon whose slogan is, change your senator not your doctor. >> i guess that's opposed to she's a male. >> i think that might be just -- the word seemed awkward to me. >> he's an awkward guy. >> okay. so female webby, however, has faced a bruising end to the campaign with newly disclosed accusations she harassed her ex-husband during their divorce in 2007. he called the police and claimed he pulled his hair, slapped him, and threw items at him. another man, a former boyfriend accused webby of stalking him last year. if she wins today, she'll go on to face democrat jeff merkley. male willie, take over.
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>> thank you, female mika. that's quite a dump at the end of the campaign. we'll see how it plays out. let's go to, eugene robinson, about kentucky. what kind of race does this shape up to be? this is as tough as mcconnell has been challenged right now. but as you look at that poll, he's locked and worried about grimes. >> all the polls show this is a close race in november. alison grimes from that clip is a formidable candidate. she's, you know, a female candidate as mitch mcconnell pointed out. he's a crafty politician. he knows kentucky. he's got a lot of strings to pull. but he's in a really tough race and it's a funny state, you know? basically as solid red state,
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but it could elect a democrat. it's not beyond the realm of possibilities. so this could be the fight of his -- of this phase of his political life. >> if memory serves me correctly, i think there's a poll within the past six or seven weeks that showed senator mcconnell's internals were highly negative against him among republicans which was kind of an interesting dynamic. and i don't know whether his opponents seeming strength would account for the fact that suddenly after all of these years steve rattner, he seems to be traveling with his wife more often than not. >> yeah. his wife is a very formidable character. she served in bush's cabinet as a secretary of labor and a force of nature. i think gives him a personality that may not always be present in his absence. so he's bringing a female. >> all right. well, speaking of females -- my
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god. i mean, it's not like we're talking about your horses or something. it's ridiculous. did mitch mcconnell say female? >> yeah. >> can someone send him a note? seriously. >> you. >> i don't think he wants one from me. speaking of females, new york city mayor bill de blasio is defending his wife following a magazine profile where she discussed her struggles as a new mom. in an interview with new york magazine, she spoke about the challenges of balancing a career with the responsibilities of being a mother. she says about her daughter in part, i was 40 years old. i had a life. the truth is i could not spend every day with her. i didn't want to do that. i looked for all kinds of reasons not to do it. it took a long time for me to get into, i'm taking care of kids, and what that means. the tabloids pounced. "the daily news" says the first lady, quote, didn't want to be a
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mom. and the new york post said i was a bad mom. mayor de blasio was not happy. he called on the papers to apologize. >> i think it was inappropriate. it really suggests a tremendous misunderstanding of what it is to be a parent, what it is to be a mother. i think a lot of women are offended. a lot of hard working women in this city are offended. i think post the post and "the daily news" owes her an apology for misrepresenting what she said and for caricaturing a reality that i think so many women face. >> so i read the article. first of all, that part of it is this much in an article this big. it was much to do about her life as an advocate, as a ground breaker, as wife of a politician, but also a partner
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who has a career in his own right and ideas in her own right and hopes and thoughts for her future in her own right. i found the headlines to be stunning. is anyone -- >> what century is this that we're in all of a sudden? i mean, we have this this week. all last week we were talking about jill abramson, you know mitch mcconnell uses "female" in that odd way. i mean, did i miss something? did we just go back, like, a hundred years? what has happened? >> "the new york post" went back. they decided to take a short part of an article, twist it around and put it on the front page. because they're after this mayor, shall we say. >> i wonder what's behind that. >> first of all, bill de blasio ought not use the word "inappropriate." it's the most overworked word in the english language today.
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it was offensive to any young mother with children. i mean, you automatically, you can't help the feeling am i going to be handcuffed to the house the rest of my life. you love your child. you're going to care for your child. but it's okay to have those feelings. >> i will say that she says what so many women feel. i felt it, absolutely. and the guilt that she talks about, lived with every day. it starts to steam roll into something worse because you really feel pressured between what society thinks you should be which is completely in love with your kids 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. something is that is not applied to a man. and if you feel that way, is there something wrong with you as a woman? because i didn't feel that way. >> but you are in love with your children 24/7 you're just exhausted because your husband isn't there. >> all she was saying was she worked since she was 14 years
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old. that she knew how to do. what she didn't know how to do was be tied to the house running around after toddlers and almost being hostage to them. >> i think maybe you'd agree to this especially with your first child. your entire focus has been you and your career and goals and all these things in your life. then this person shows up and you love them more than you've loved anything in your life, but it's an adjustment. that's all she was talking about. i don't think we should be surprise. ed it's on the cover of these papers. that's what they're in the business of being provocative. but this went too far. >> i feel she broke the taboo of what women feel by they're not allowed to say. >> some will say it but they aren't married to a new york mayor. >> this is true. it will be interesting. we're going to talk to the author of new york magazine profile coming up on "morning joe." we're going to have a more broad conversation, bring other names and faces to the table as well.
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speaking of offensive comments, the nba is officially moving forward with plans to strip donald sterling of his ownership of the los angeles clippers. he is accused of actions that continues to hurt the nba. the disgraced owner has until may 27th to respond to the charges. his lawyer has requested a three-month delay which is unlikely to happen. sterling will have the opportunity to make his case to fellow owners at a hearing on june 3rd. if 3/4 of the owners vote to uphold the charges, sterling will be forced to sell the clippers. as he should. >> so steve, donald sterling's argument is you cannot just strip a person of their property at will. there has to be a case. we all knew this was coming. he was going to sue back and fight. but there's no way that come opening night in october that donald sterling is owning the
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clippers. you've had players like lebron james saying if he own this clippers, i will not play next season. there's going to be a big fight along the way. >> i think one thing about this that hasn't really come out and i think i'm right in saying this, there's a tax fight involved in this whole thing. because he bought that team for nothing. if he dies with that as part of his estate, he gets a step up in basis. and he avoids paying a couple million dollars on that because of the way the team is sold. he's not a well man, as also been reported. i think there's a little bit of a substance text here i need this in my estate because it's going to cost me a lot of money if i die first. the contract between the nba and the owners seems clear. there's other businesses where you can lose your license, lose your franchise, lose your rights if you're part of an organization and you've agreed to abide by its rules. >> it's been reprehensible for
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so long. just get it over with. moving on, it was one of the most devastating tornadoes in american history. 24 dead, 400 hurt. and the town of moore, oklahoma, leveled. "morning joe" is on the scene just hours after the storm hit. and thomas roberts has made his way back there. >> mika, good morning to you. good morning, everyone. it was a year ago that we all made our way here and it was amazing to come back yesterday to see exactly how far moore, oklahoma, has progressed in 12 months' time. if we look at some of the numbers, 175,000 tons of debris has been removed over the year. we can see certain lots that have been leveled and the slow start of rebuilding. but it is amazing to think for 39 minutes last year, an ef-5 tornado touched down destroying moore. >> it was pretty scary. everybody was rushing everybody. and then i came out and i saw the cars and i saw the houses and i just started crying so
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hard. >> reporter: "morning joe" traveled to the scene of the devastation just hours a the storm hit. the images were hard to comprehend. >> the scene behind us, it's like from a post-apocalyptic movie. >> it's hard to wrap your mind around what you're seeing. >> what you're seeing is a neighborhood behind us that's no longer standing. >> it was house, house, house, house. all that's left is foundations pip keep getting overwhelmed by these sights. this was a little girl's room. you see the clothes still hanging. >> reporter: the tornado was a mile high at its base kicking up clouds of debris that stretch two miles wide. winds at 200 miles per hour. the hospital became a symbolic image of the destruction throughout the neighborhood. and it was the last day of class as the plaza towers elementary school. >> we had to sit like this and
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the tornado started knocking on the ceilings, go up and down. and a light went down and it hit me in the head. and all the other girls were screaming and they were crying. >> i had to hold onto the wall to keep myself safe, because i didn't want to fly away in the tornado. >> it was coming, it was hitting, and everybody said put your heads down, put your heads down. some people got hurt. >> reporter: while the trauma of the event is so clear in the voices of the children, the stories of survival went beyond the young. >> we had to pull a car out of the front hallway off a teacher. i don't know what that lady's name is, but she had three little kids underneath her. good job, teach. it ripped our house up. there's a little girl buried there. >> reporter: it was on the ground for nearly 40 minutes leaving thousands homeless. the winds were strong enough to rip the bark off trees. families did whatever they could to find shelter.
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>> we had the three girls in the tub and we had couch cushions behind them. my husband and i were knelt down in front of them with a mattress over us and we all had helmets on and huddled together and locked arm. just right there. >> reporter: can you believe you survived? you rode this out in the family bathtub? >> no. i only -- i think it's a miracle. i mean, i don't -- i don't know how i'm standing here. >> reporter: even president obama seemed emotional during his visit to the storm ravaged community appearing to wipe away a tear while talking to a victim. >> the people of moore should know that our country will remain on the ground there for them beside them as long as it takes for their homes and schools to rebuild, businesses and hospitals to reopen, their parents to console, first responders to comfort, and of
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course frightened children who will need our continued love and attention. there are empty spaces where there used to be living rooms and bedrooms and classrooms. and in time, we're going to need to refill those spaces with love and laughter and community. >> reporter: last month moore became the first city in the country to adopt rules specifically aimed at preventing extensive tornado damage with tough new residential building codes. it's now going to require new homes to withstand winds up to 135 miles per hour. but again, let's just remind everybody. the winds sustained here were over 200 miles an hour. and behind me this is plaza towers elementary school. they are in the process of rebuilding the school to open in the fall. you'll recall when we were here, this is the elementary school that had seven children die while trying to survive the storm. there was also another elementary school that was damaged, but they didn't lose any of their students.
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and it was amazing to come back yesterday. we'll show you video coming up later of where we were on the corner there of south telephone road and southwest 6th. that corner plot of land, that house and the debris, that's all gone. the slab doesn't eastbound exist anymore. across the street where the moore hospital was, the medical facility, that's completely leveled. and there is a tent city of hospital emergency rooms there. we'll show you that coming up as well. but it's stunning to see the healing that's happened, but also stunning to see there hasn't been a bigger burst of rebirth in the areas where we focused on last year. >> and storm shelters in every school because it's not a matter of if, it's going to be when. thomas, thanks very much. we'll check in with you throughout the morning. among your guests will be oklahoma governor mary fallon. we can ask her about that. thomas, thank you. coming up on "morning joe," actor liam neeson makes his western debut.
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why he took the role in the raunchy new comedy. plus "good talk, dad." the great bill geist will be here on set with the stories in their new book. up next, the cia is giving up the spy tactic that helped end the hunt for osama bin laden. we'll tell you what that tactic was and the reason they're dropping it. but first here's bill kairns with the check on the forecast. bill? >> so many memories being brought back from what happened there in oklahoma. for me was the odds of moore getting hit twice by an ef-5 tornado twice. as far as the two storms, what was really incredible is the path of the storms. the blue line and the red line are the strong ef-5s 14 years apart. they crossed paths and almost went in the exact same direction. the blue one was the one from
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'99. that went to the north side of moore. then the last year one was on the south side of moore. the pictures looks like joplin, like tuscaloosa, and other bad sites. we do have a chance of seeing strong thunderstorms today. later this afternoon into areas of cedar rapids. we do not think this will be tornadoes. but if you're in chicago, indianapolis, ft. wayne, all the way down to indianapolis and columbus. a line of strong storms with damaging winds heading your way. a lot of power outages expected with that. thankfully we've had a quiet, knock on wood, tornado season in oklahoma. they had the el reno tornado that was an ef-5 a couple weeks after this one. they've only had five tornadoes up to this point in oklahoma all year long. typically they average about 55. we're at a nice, slow pace. and they deserve it after what they went through last year there in moore. more on "morning joe" coming up.
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well, knowing gives you confidence. start building your confident retirement today. ♪ time now to take a look at the morning papers. from our parade of papers, "the washington post." there are concerns about a potential coup in thailand this morning after a surprise move overnight. the country is currently under marshal law. right now the military is in charge of security across the country. army leaders want to restore order after six months of anti-government protests. there have been 11 coups in thailand since 1932. >> "the washington times" the
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cia says they will no longer use vaccinations for spying. in 2011 a doctor offered vaccinations in pakistan if as cover for the cia to obtain dna at the compound where osama bin laden was eventually killed. this comes as protests have resulted in 56 deaths in the country over the last two years. >> "the new york times." flood danger persists in serbia. the worst in 120 years. closing in near their capital. hundreds of thousands of people are without electricity and thousands more have been evacuated. it's left some towns under water. >> "the wall street journal," credit suisse will pay nearly $3 billion fine. it's the largest financial institution to ever enter a guilty plea. that's in the last 20 years at least.
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the bank helped clients avoid paying u.s. taxes by creating secret offshore accounts. it sets a template for how the u.s. may respond. what's going on here? >> it's incredible. they literally would send their bankers into the u.s. on tourist visas meeting secretly with americans to help them avoid u.s. taxes. now they're going to plead guilty. they're going to pay a $2.6 billion fine, but the next day they'll go to business as usual. >> the same thing will happen again? >> probably not for awhile. but if you're an individual and get caught up in this, you might go to jail like one guy did the other day. you might be barred from something the rest of your life. credit suisse is allowed to go about their business like nothing happened. >> why is that? >> it's corollary to too big to fail. no government wants to be secreted for putting down a bank
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that big. >> what's going to happen to the house? >> nothing. eight employees have left the bank, others will be required to leave the bank. but the ceo of the bank who's an american actually, but this goes back a long time before his watch. so it gets complicated, stays in place. >> is this going on elsewhere or is this a credit suisse? >> you possibly believe it could be going on elsewhere? i can't imagine. the famous swiss bank accounts we've heard over the year, they truly existed. >> looks like the u.s. government is moving on those now. let's go to playbook for a look inside politico's playbook. editor in chief john harris. >> good morning. >> so democrats fighting to keep the senate majority as we know in the midterm elections. politico reporting that one key democrat is not invested in the fight at least not as much as some democrats would like him to be. who is it? >> that man is barack obama who's got more at stake than any other person in the midterm
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elections. reviving his presidency depends a lot on preventing republicans from take over the senate. but there's frustration among a lot of democrats that my colleague talked to which is that they feel the president's not engaged with coming up with a coordinated democratic strategy. he's busy raising money which is a big thing that helps, but he doesn't seem personally invested in the strategy. had in-person briefings with bill clinton, gone up to new york to talk to the former president. hasn't had an equivalent of that with obama himself. >> how unusual is that? would a president usually be more engaged at this point about six months out from election day? >> a lot of democrats say now is the time. they do feel, yes, that now is the time where they want to be -- they want some tangible evidence that the president himself is prepared to invest his personal credibility in carrying some of these democrats over the line. and so, you know, presidents are
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political to different degrees. clearly bill clinton at an equivalent stage would have been more heavily involved than barack obama himself is. >> john, this lel of engagement or lack of engagement from the president, is it drastically different than any? >> president obama gets engaged when he himself is on the ballot, doesn't care that much, some say. the white house says that's unfair and point to signs as evidence that the president is really invested in these races. but another big problem that isaac points out in this piece is that the messaging has not really worked. the minimum wage and income inequality, we heard so much from the white house months ago. but it's not doing much. it's not helping them with middle class voters. it sounds like a more traditional kind of help the poor message. consequently we've seen that
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less used out there. >> another story, john. interesting bit of news popping up yesterday. former democratic senator from a key swing state hinting he may consider running for something in 2016. who is it and what's he thinking? >> sure, willie. you remember jim webb who was representing the senate from virginia. i tell you what, i have my ear cocked pretty well to sort of presidential rumblings in this job. i hadn't heard any too to date but there are some in webb's own mind. he's out pressing a memoir he's written. in the course of that he's said i would consider running for president 2016. that doesn't seem like real possibility unless a certain democrat chooses not to run. in which case the door would be wide open. jim webb has been an interesting guy as long as he's been in public life. i think there would be a lot of people who'd find this intriguing. >> he's going to be on "morning
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joe" next week. so we'll ask him. >> he said, quote, he's thinking about rejoining the debate. >> but not as vice president. >> right. that's right. john harris with a look inside the politico playbook, thanks so much. still ahead, it was one of the most unexpected prom invites ever, but did joe biden make it a night to remember? >> no, he did not. come on. the thunder struggled without their key player. sports is next. ♪ and just give them the basics, you know. i got this. [thinking] is it that time? the son picks up the check? [thinking] i'm still working. he's retired. i hope he's saving. i hope he saved enough. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. whether you're just starting your 401(k)
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♪ all right. time for some sports. the nba playoffs, thunder and spurs game one of the western conference finals. the spurs jumped out to an early lead. tim duncan still getting it done. 21 points in the first half. led san antonio 27 in the game. third quarter, okc pushes back a bit. durant makes a three. thunder missing defensive presence serge ibaka in the middle. spurs win 122-105. tonight miami looks to get even at indiana in game two of the eastern conference finals. indiana took game one in that series. california chrome's triple crown hopes alive.
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the horse bb allowed to wear the nasal strip. he used the breathing aid in the previous two wins and his owner had said he wouldn't run him in the belmont without it. no horse has won the triple crown since affirms did it in 1978. >> but there have been 12 that won the first two. so it's going to be an interesting race. >> absolutely. the ice. stanley cup playoffs. canadiens in montreal tied at one at the end of first period. >> elted down by kreider. score! >> that's rick nash for the rangers netting the go-ahead goal for new york. rangers get another win on the road and they're now up 2-0. two wins away from playing in the stan lieu cup finals. tonight the blackhawks host the kings in game two. the blackhawks won the first one in chicago.
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little baseball now. tigers and indians tied. michael brantley at bat with a full count, two outs. >> 3-2 to brantley. brantley with a drive deep down the right field line. good! and the indians win it! >> there it is. the walkoff win. michael brantley. 5-4 was the score. good for tito francona, right? >> my man. our guy. >> he is the man. coming up next, millions of americans will hit the road this memorial day. should they pack their patience? >> i think they should. definitely. you'll be told to do that by reporters standing on the highway. it's a good use of resources. >> but are their driving habits hurting the country? that and a look at today's must-read opinion pages. we'll be right back with more "morning joe." ♪ [ male announcer ] some come here
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♪ time now for the must-read opinion pages. i just want to point to something in "the wall street journal" greater new york section. chris christie made a talk this sunday over the weekend. it looked a lot like he's running for president. the crux of the article is that the issue of israel is posing a challenge for him because he didn't bring it up. 16-minute talk delivered to the jewish international awards gala focused on the need for the u.s. to reclaim role on issues including syria and civil war and emboldened russia and iran's work on a nuclear reactor. he mentioned the former president ronald reagan several times as a model of relationship and criticized washington gridlock. he said things like this which
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sound like a candidate, america is no longer sending clear signals to me world. consistent signals. signals like the ones ronald reagan sent when he was president as to whom our friends are, the governor said on sunday. in the audience, eugene robinson, sheldon adelson, the las vegas casino magnate and who vowed to support the next presidential candidate. they spoke after the meeting one-on-one. thoughts as to why chris christie would take time to do that on a sunday afternoon or evening? >> you know, mika, i think he's running for president. i think he's trying to establish a position in foreign policy. i guess the question is not so much sending signals, i would argue, but sending troops. you want to talk about syria, send all the signals you want. that doesn't seem to do much to
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bashir al assad. >> as much as he's been plagued by bridgegate, he's raised more money than all o other republicans. >> and her got in trouble in march talking about the west bank in terms of occupied territories. i think a lot of people thought that speech was a chance for him to clear that up. and he didn't do it well enough wsh some say. let's move on to steve rattner's charts. that's why we're here today. the latest victim of gridlock in washington. your first chart, steve. americans are driving less. first part of the problem. >> right. we're coming up on memorial day weekend. a lot of people are going to take to the roads. fewer than in the past, because what's happened since the recession began in 2008. is americans are starting to drive less. you can see this blue line which
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has been growing, growing, actually flat. if you look at a per capita basis, americans are driving a lot less. they're down from 13,000 miles a year per american, they're down to 12,000 miles a year at the moment. this is a little bit of recession, a bit of young people not living as far from work and so on. but it has consequences for our roads. a lot of our road repair is financed by the gas tax. here's what's been happening to the gas tax since then. if we look at the next chart. so yeah. the gas tax was last increased in 1993. and if you look at it on inflation basis, it's been going down, down, down. as a mix of the fact people are driving less, using less gasoline and so on. and inflation has eroded that gas tax. so the consequences of that, the
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gate goes into the highway trust fund. the highway trust fund pays for repairs to roads. if you look at the state of the highway trust fund, you'll see the implications of this gas tax thing. declining revenues. then over here in these last four years, congress has had to put $54 billion of the general into this fund. >> 1993. >> and at the moment the gas tax -- the highway trust fund is going to go broke this august. >> terrific. >> this august then start to run these kinds of deficits. meanwhile congress is in a fight about the fact that people don't want to spend more. people don't want to tax more. they do want their roads. so they may pass some kind of stopgap measure, but in the meanwhile, there's a million miles of roads that are at the mercy of what's going on in congress. >> so if politicians do not raise the gas tax, what are they
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proposed to do about the roads are crumbling and full of potholes? we see it every day. >> i drove in from the country on sunday, and every time you hit those potholes -- i think the solution is going to be they'll take general revenue and stick it in the trust fund as a stopgap measure. the conservatives won't like that because it will be an increase in our budget deficit. it'll be another one of these classic washington, take steps and not do anything at the root of it all. >> do you suppose they could figure if you raise the gas tax minimally to repair roads and bridges, that means you hire people who make money who then spend money in small businesses. can they figure that out? >> some of the wiser people have made that point, but it has gone unheard. >> okay. here's a question for you all. what went wrong at willie's epic senior year house party? what went wrong there?
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>> i know. >> and what would prompt willie to get an earring? willie's dad bill geist hits the table for the answers to the question for their new book. and it's one of the most iconic guitar riffs of all time but it may have been stolen from another band? no. that story is next. ♪ [ male announcer ] staples has everything you need to launch a startup from your garage. from computers, smartphones, and 3-d printers to coffee, snacks, and drinks to fuel the big ideas. yes, staples has everything you need to launch a startup from your garage. mom! except permission to use the garage. thousands of products added every day to staples.com. even safety cones. this week, get maxwell house® original roast ground coffee for $5.99. staples. make more happen.
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♪ and now here to perform the world's first-ever lip-synch -- nip-sync duet, welcome terry crews and jimmy fallon. ♪ ebony and ivory ♪ live together in perfect harmony ♪ ♪ side by side ♪ oh lord ♪ why don't we ♪ ebony ivory ♪ living in perfect harmony >> wow. >> yucky. >> wow. that was a lot of grease on those gentlemen. >> was that funny? >> yeah. they're amazing up there. the things they come up with. somebody sat down and thought
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let's strip them down and let them -- >> maybe their pecks move? yuck. a connecticut teenager decided to go big for he high school prom. she invited none other than the vice president of the united states joe biden. she sends a handwritten note saying quote, i could only tolerate a high school dance if i was to be escorted by the most delightful man in america. she warned that if biden turned her down she would ask john boehner instead. adding, quote, we can't have that. months later she received a delivery at her door. it was a handwritten note and a corsage from the veep himself. the vice president writing, quote, i'm flattered by mu schedule would not permit me to be in connecticut on friday evening. but i hope you accept this corsage and enjoy your prom. biden's assistant says she picked out the flowers for the
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girl. the young girl did not believe it was really from her. she said yes that is from mr. biden. >> that's cute. >> nicely done. it is widely considered one of the greatest songs in history plagiarism charges for the song "stairway to heaven." the band stewart is saying they lifted one of the most famous riffs. here's zeppelin's version. ♪ all right. so that's zeppelin. now here is spirit's song "taurus." ♪ >> that sounds kind of similar. i don't know. >> so the band played several
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shows with zeppelin in 1969. led zeppelin allegedly wrote "stairway to heaven" two years after they toured together in the united states. >> "stairway to heaven," the ultimate slow dance song. >> where have they been for 40 years? >> someone's in need of money. >> i think so. looking for cheese. >> did you slow dance to it? >> i'm sure i did. >> we're going ask your father. >> the problem with that song if you're slow dancing with someone you don't want to dance with, it goes on forever. you're like, my gosh. that happened to me. okay? that's the only thing that ever happened to me in high school. the longest slow dance that i didn't want to have. >> that's a long song. >> yeah. it was bad. still ahead on "morning joe," a political blogger tried to break into a nursing home to photograph the wife of united states senator.
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if you think that's the worst example of dirty tactics in this year's races, you might be surprised. plus -- >> i love my wife very deeply. she is an extraordinary mother. she always has been. she very much wanted to have children, which is evident in the new york magazine article if anyone cares to read it and not caricature it. >> new york city mayor bill de blasio defending his wife by her treatment by the new york tabloids. and later -- >> at first i didn't want to take this vacation, now i'm glad i did. it's given me a chance to spend a lot more time with you and -- >> audrey. >> audrey, yeah. >> good talk, russ. i have to tell you that scene helped inspire the new book i wrote with my dad. bill geist will be with us here on set talking "good talk, dad." stay with us. ♪
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♪ all right. it's the top of the hour. a beautiful shot of new york city as the sun is up over the big apple. welcome back to "morning joe." mike barnicle, steve rattner, and eugene robinson still with us. joining us from washington, abc political commentator cokie roberts. great to have you on this morning. >> good morning. nice to be with you. >> thank you very much. we'll begin this hour with a
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battle in the senate. voters will decide which candidates head to the general election in key battle ground states. mitch mcconnell looks secure against tea party challenger matt bevin, but it is his likely november opponent democrat alison lun alison lundergan grimes that poses more of a threat. >> i am a kentucky woman who my colleagues have referred to as an empty dress. that seeks to retire mitch mcconnell. mitch mcconnell fails to realize that it's labor that have lifted millions out of poverty as he says no to collective bargaining, as he says no to prevailing wage. you will have someone in the united states the saying right to work for less is just another saying for union busting and i
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will have none of it. >> for mcconnell, it's not just keeping his seat in the senate. he's got his eyes on majority leader if republicans take control. >> twlst only one thing we can do about it in 2014. in 2014 you can make me the offensive coordinator instead of the defensive coordinator. >> so to shift the balance of power, gop candidates need to win six seats. and mcconnell thinks that monica webby may be one of them. >> for you women in the room, you'd love our candidate in oregon who's going to be nominated today. tomorrow. their primary is the same day as ours. she's a female pediatric neurosurgeon whose slogan is change your senator, not your doctor. >> okay. i'm going to go to cokie roberts, because she, too, is a female. >> therefore an expert on dr.
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monica webby. she has got a real problem in oregon. and it's a perfect example of what happens when you go to a political unknown. she looked great on paper. a pediatric neurosurgeon as you heard senator mcconnell say. she's attractive. she has no record which can be useful. and the tea party supports her opponent. the truth is that she's had all these police reports come out where both her former boyfriend and her former husband have accused her of stalking them and in the police report from her former husband, he says that she threw a note pad at him. now, the police say they got there and saw a little red mark on his face that could have been, and i'm quoting here, a zit. so it clearly wasn't a serious injury, but still.
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it does raise questions about her character if they keep having these reports. i think she probably will have trouble winning today. >> i don't want even know. wow. well, so senator mcconnell is offering support to the republican candidate in oregon as she deals with the bruising end to her primary campaign. and it surrounds newly revealed details about the messy divorce and whether it was the note pad or zit. anyhow, this is hardly the only race this cycle to feature some of the darker sides of politics. so nbc's kasie hunt has much more for you. >> i think negative campaigns are like nitroglycerin. unstable, dangerous, and oftentimes most dangerous to the people using them. >> reporter: good advice from a man who knows a thing or two about winning campaigns. but not everyone is listening. in just the last week, there are reports of a senate candidate who once threw things at her
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ex-husband. new documents claiming a texas politician tried to commit suicide two decades ago. and then there's the political blogger who tried to break into a nursing home to photograph a senator's bedridden wife. >> we don't know this guy. we have no idea who he is that's been arrested by the madison police trying to do what is one of the most despicable things i have ever heard of. >> reporter: blogger clayton kelly supports tea party candidate chris mcdaniel who's challenging thad cochran. he's accused of taking pictures of cochran's wife who's ill and posting them on this website. >> just a source of a lot of ugly rumors and nasty stuff. we wanted it squashed. >> reporter: in nearby texas, there are just days until a runoff election. lieutenant governor david dewhurst is distancing himself from documents suggesting opponent dan patrick once attempted suicide.
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>> the race took a bizarre turn thursday night with the release of court documents showing he was hospitalized for depression in the '80s. >> reporter: meanwhile in oregon, these are the headlines the day before primary voting ends. according to the police report, quote, monica has pulled his hair, slapped him, and thrown items at him. but negative campaigning has a mixed track record. it's easy to remember the attacks that worked. like this one against michael dukakis. >> gordon kidnapped a couple repeatedly raping his girlfriend. a weekend pass. dukakis on crime. >> reporter: in a close race with rand paul, jack conway's campaign ran this. >> why did rand paul tie a woman up and tell him his god was aqua buddha? >> what are we going here?
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>> what a collection of people. >> kasie joins us where she's safe there. as the candidates make their -- i'm going to stick to kentucky, i think, as the candidates make their closing arguments, anything new this morning? >> well, kentucky voters remember the aqua buddha ad well. they are now going for what's going to be a big race here. we're expecting mitch mcconnell here later today. we're expecting them to spend tens of millions of dollars on the air attacking each other. they've already been on the air for months with no real promise of it letting up. mcconnell is deeply unpopular here. the question is whether or not he's able to resuscitate those numbers. he's tried in several sort of positive bigraphical ads. so far it doesn't seem to have worked. so his only alternative could be to drag down grimes' numbers as
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much as possible. that means voters are in for a dragout fight. >> cokie, it's interesting. kasie just referenced that mcconnell is deeply unpopular in kentucky but unpopular even within the republican structure in kentucky and yet he is obviously very popular within the minority of republicans who are in the united states senate. talk about the differences between being a leader in the senate and running for re-election in your own home state. >> well, actually, being a leader in the senate can be a detriment for running in your home state. the fact is that people at home want you to be paying attention at home. and we've seen several key senators lose mainly in their primaries because they haven't paid attention at home. but for instance, like dick lugar who was a very respected member of the senate from indiana, chairman of the committee at various times lost
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to a tea partier. now, that's not happening to mcconnell. and that is an important thing to talk about today. because what the republicans have caught onto is that they are not allowing the candidates who can't win in november to win their primaries. and so mcconnell's going to win his primary in kentucky. it looks like the people who are running in georgia who are on the republican side, the more mainstream republicans are going to come out ahead in that primary. and in oregon, we'll see. because of the last-minute charges against dr. webby. but mcconnell, even though people don't like him, they vote for him. and that keeps happening. so i think that he's -- even though it's going to be a rough race, he's likely to win it. >> alison grimes has done well. but there are five and a half months left until election day. what's the core of her argument
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against mitch mcconnell should she make it through and mcconnell make it through tonight? >> she's making the core argument that she's the one who's going to be rooted in kentucky. she's essentially tying mcconnell to a very unpopular washington. and he's actually making the argument that because he's been in washington so long, he's the right person for kentucky and i asked her yesterday if she could bring home the amount of money that he has. she dinged him for those earmarks. he had to distance himself from those. it meant senators in neighboring states got credit for a recent dam project. i had seen her campaign here in february. i saw her again last night. she's made marked improvements on the stump. >> all right. quick, steve. >> just to mike's point. there is precedent of people tired of having a leader out of state that they feel is out of touch and not looking after
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them. you had tom daschle who had been there a long time. you had tom foley losing in oregon in 1994. so every once in awhile, the populist does rise up and say we want someone paying attention to us. and this guy's out of touch. >> i made fun of using the word "female." but it came across as old fashioned and completely out of touch. >> old fashioned for mitch mcconnell? >> it was like, what are you talking about? but that's what we got. let's move onto this story. this is something else. new york mayor bill de blasio is defending his wife this morning following a magazine profile where she discussed her struggles as a new mom. she talks about the challenges of balancing a career with the responsibilities of being a mother. she says about her daughter in part, quote, this.
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it was a long article and here's the quote. i was 40 years old. hi a life. the truth is i could not spend every day with her. she had just had her baby. i didn't want to do that. i looked for all kinds of reasons not to do it. it took a long time for me to get into, i'm taking care of kids, and what that means. the tabloids pounced. the new york post ran a screaming headline, i was a bad mom. mayor de blasio not happy speaking to reporters at city hall. the democrat called on the papers to apologize. >> i think it's deeply disturbing. i think it was inappropriate. it really suggests a tremendous misunderstanding of what it is to be a parent and mother. i think a lot of women are offended. a lot of hard working women in this city are offended. i think both the post and "the daily news" owe her an apology, all of us an apology for absolutely misrepresenting what
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she said and for caricaturing a reality that i think so many women face. >> so i'd like to go to cokie roberts again not only because she's female but from a legacy of strong mothers. i read the new york post i think it was and there was a headline saying i was a bad mother. i thought is there abuse involved. and i open it up and she said something a lot of women feel. is that fair? >> of course. absolutely. i had my babies in my early 20s. it was a lot easier than being as involved as she was in her career. the truth is nobody wants to spend all day every day with a baby. they don't say anything. they're darling and they coo and all of that, but they're not the most scintillating company. and so i think that she was just
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saying the truth and what a huge number of people feel. and it has clearly been distorted. give me a break. >> give me a break. i found it inappropriate is what the word the mayor used. i think it was offensive and i feel like they wouldn't say this about other people. eugene robinson, what could be behind such an attack like this? >> well, it's partly political. "the new york post" of course doesn't like mayor de blasio and would like to weaken him however it can. i think, however, it did something that is bound to create sympathy for de blasio and for his whole family. and also i think "the new york post" owes us an apology as part of the media. i think this is part of the reason of why we rate so low in terms of approval and popularity is things like this.
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just obviously unfair personal attacks. it's just -- >> this is one that hit where it hurts for women who -- i mean, as working women, women who work at home, whoufr you want to describe it. we spend most of our time with those some of those feelings that chirlane said and trying to appease everyone and show them we love them. for some reason this was -- i don't know. below the belt. it was completely off base to attack her that way. >> why don't you explain to the male editors of "the new york post" how exhausted you get after having a child. and there comes a point in time quickly after having that child that your partner, your husband leaves for work and you don't. >> well, i mean, i literally -- i have a -- my husband is an equal part. i will say there were times, though, where i took our daughter to the doctor and it
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just didn't even don on -- the thought of him going with us was not happening i do things the husband doesn't do. it comes down to us. and that's why i read this and it hurt so much. >> right. and you do all those things and then you also go to work. many women choose to work. >> work is the great place to go. that's the dirty little secret that men have known for years and years is that going to work is a great relief. it is so much easier to go to work than it is to stay at home. >> get some sleep at work. >> and also it's just to find activities. you know what you're doing. you're probably good at it. and it is something that does involve adult companionship and all of that. home is hard. it's always being on call. you're never off duty. >> cokie, the number of women
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that have to work on top of it. so wow. i had never seen anything like it in a lot of ways. i've seen some crazy headlines, but not one like this that was cold and sered. i think it did sere most women who read it. i want to send it back now to moore, oklahoma, where the community there is marking one year after that devastating tornado. thomas roberts is live near the same spot we visited just hours after the storm hit. thomas? >> reporter: mika, good morning to you. we are live this morning in front of plaza towers elementary school. this is just one of the elementary schools that was devastated last year when that ef-5 tornado came through moore. behind me this is the spot where seven children died. as you can see, they have started the process of rebuilding this elementary school. they hope to have it open by fall. and as we look around this neighborhood, a lot more homes are coming back with brick structures but when owe went to the same spot we were broadcasting from last year, it was encouraging to see the
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rebuilding that has happened. it is also a little heart breaking to see a lot of the building that hasn't happened. here's a look at what we saw. so this is the exact same spot where we were broadcasting from last year. this is the home of amber and her husband and daughter. they rode out the storm in their bathtub wearing helmets and they pulled mattresses over the bathtub. they came out of the storm unscathed, but their house was a deplete wreck. and now it's just a dirt pile. there's not even a slab that remains here anymore. you'll also remember in the front yard there was a tree over here. it was surrounded by metal shrapnel. and that used to be the moore medical facility. it's leveled now. they put down new roads, but they've done no reconstruction. what they have now is that area of tents for the moore emergency clinic that they've been able to serve patients that way. and there you see down there, the movie theater where they had
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some roof repairs. that remains pretty much unchanged. so it really is amazing to see the progress that has been made in certain spots. you'll remember that corner. it was on south telephone road and southwest 6th that we were doing our live reporting from. now there is some small regrowth there with homes that have been rebuilt. but you'll recall the devastation that was the moore medical facility across the way that also had that day care center. that is completely gone. now just a flat surface. there is some pavement down for roads because they plan to have the medical facility open in 2016 there. but as you saw in that example, they have the tent city of an emergency room there for those that need treatment so they can help the patients there. i guess you have to temper expectations of how quickly they can rebuild, how smartly they
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can rebuild. there's been over some 8,000 building permits issued. as i'm looking around here at plaza towers, so many homes are going up with brick construction. >> thomas, thank you so much. we'll talk to you soon. appreciate it. still ahead from schindler's list to a raunchy western comedy? we'll find out why liam neeson took the big creative risk when he joins us in our 8:00 hour. and later this hour, two races in two cities all in one day. kurt busch is planning to put that off and why. okay. up next, oh yeah. oh, yeah. you know what? i got some questions for this guy. i've watched him all my life. i've worked with him. i worked with him. bill geist here to spill the beans on willie, his childhood, and everything else. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ i make a lot of purchases for my business.
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♪ parents wouldn't do that. you guys are nice. we have a father/son moment here happening. it's sort of like that moment on national lampoon's vacation. remember that one? >> good talk. >> here it is. >> my dad shared a beer with me and i thought it was the best thing in the world. yeah. when i was a boy just about every summer we'd take a vacation. and you know, in 18 years, we never had fun. but now i have my own family and, well, we're on our own vacation. you know something, russ?
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>> what, dad? >> we're going to have fun. we're going to have fun. hey. don't let your mother smell that beer on your breath. she'll take it out on me. well, i better get a move on if i want to get us out of here by dark. >> right. >> good talk, son. >> good talk, dad. >> that's it. >> that scene helped inspire their new book "good talk, dad: the birds and the bees and other conversations we forgot to have." joins us now "cbs this morning" correspondent bill geist and his son willie geist who is a male. >> i am. they are the first one to realize it comes directly from that scene. >> we have one person who gets it. >> thank god. >> it's the good talk, dad, in the spirit of chevy chase.
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we never had good talks. >> i talked to willie about the dangers of thol last week. >> a little late, but we got it. >> i didn't think of that scene even though i haven't seen the movie, i could hear you saying that. >> we don't want to have the talk. >> nobody does. why did you decide to write this book? it's funny but it's wonderful in many ways. >> thank you. you were nice to read it. i like the idea of writing have a book. when you collaborate, you only write half. the second was two years ago my dad went on national tv on "cbs sunday morning" and told the world he has parkinson's disease he's had for two decades. we realized we never had a talk about this huge thing. he hadn't told me or my sister libby for ten years he had it. we didn't know because you couldn't see the outward signs at that point. then we got to the funny thing. we never talked about sex. we never talked about drinking. we never talked about all these
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things that dads are supposed to talk to sons about. so we go back and have awkward conversations. >> better late than never. >> the sex thing, i had no idea what to say or how to do it. i thought it would happen naturally in the woods. >> because you didn't know anything about it. you were like me. >> i didn't want him contradicting me. in third grade, kids are taught more than i know now. i'm real clear on it today. >> it all just doesn't make any sense, does it? >> the truth is talking to people about this book now anecdotally, i don't know about you, mike, i haven't heard any fathers and son who sat down and said let's talk about sex, son. what dad and kid want that can frgs? >> can you imagine my dad and brothers? >> a visual component? i didn't know what to do. >> i love it. >> this book is not only laugh out loud funny every page of it, but it is a must-read for every family in america. for many, many reasons.
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but i want to ask you, bill geist, what were you thinking when you sent willie to summer camp? >> i had the best intentions as fathers and mothers always do. so jodi his mother and i we researched this. we went to the camp expo down at the center where you can send your kid to finland or become the greate eses eses esest baso. we dropped him off and thought it would work. >> it looked lovely. what the guy who sold my dad a cut rate camp, what he didn't share was that the counselors at the camp were in rehabilitation. they were juvenile offenders. in some cases they had committed mostly nonviolent crime but some violent. and we didn't know that when we got there. so i kid you not, there were
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gang fights at the camp. there was one night where some of the counselors went and slashed the tires on each other's cars. we often couldn't get into what they call the pill box which was the medical facility because the woman, the nurse in the pill box was sleeping with some of the counselors and they were locked up in there. so if you had a medical condition, you just had to wait until they were finished. . >> wow. >> we learned a few things. >> that beats being held hostage in niese with the family to take care of the kids where there are no kids. >> i get a $25 discount coupon. cut it out of a sunday magazine. >> you love your truck, right? >> i love my truck, right. >> did you see the picture of the red jeep. >> i did. i was coveting it. >> willie finally drove the red jeep all the way from new jersey to vanderbilt. >> that was our family car there 1984. my dad spent every nickel of a book advance on that car. >> $7700. it was extra if you wanted a
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front seat. >> that's the way the jeeps were. >> so he paid for a back seat but no power steering, no frills whatsoever. by the time i learned to drive 13 years later, and it was so beat up, the floor was rusted through. but that was our family car. mom used to pick me up with no doors many the red jeep regardless of the weather. >> i like this picture of you, you look like eddie haskell. >> that's my senior photograph in high school. you can't see because of the black and white, it's blurred, i have an earring in. >> and you tell that story. why? what in god's name? >> our entire football team got earrings. it was this act of rebellion. except i told my mom about it and she said all right, if you do it, we'll do it the right way. the other guys were jabbing needles through their ears. my mom drove me personally to her little hair and nail salon. >> willie.
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>> it take this rebellion out of it when your mom takes you to her hair salon. >> there's your tough guy right there. >> what conversations did you guys actually have that maybe you would have never had if you didn't do this book together? >> lots of them. >> most of it is fun and light and we didn't have a serious birds and bees conversation. but we talked about parkinson's more than we had. we talked more deeply about why he didn't tell us about it and what his life is like with it. >> why didn't he? >> i didn't because i'd always been the fun guy. and i didn't want to be -- when i walk into a room i didn't want the first thing people thought of is, oh, he has parkinson's or he's a sick guy. and i didn't want my kids to worry about it. i didn't know where it was going and i didn't want them to think it was catastrophic. >> the remarkable thing about my dad is not only has he lived and worked with it. he's worked with it on national television.
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>> not always effectively. >> always effectively. >> your stuff's amazing as it always has been. >> thank you. >> and you know what? you bring light to a condition that a lot of people suffer from. and make it okay. >> i have found that. >> make it part of life. >> i got probably a couple thousand e-mails from people who contracted parkinson's. it's sort of embarrassing. i've always been the outsider and women rush up to me in the airport and say you're my hero. >> oh, stop bragging women rush up to me in the airport. >> they've always rushed up to me in the airport. they usually had police uniforms on. >> i'm going to embarrass you a little more. >> please. >> willie, talk about your dad who's an icon, iconic tv appearances on "cbs sunday morning." but he's an old print guy. >> people say did your dar inspire you to get into tv. i don't think he thinks of himself as a tv guy. one of the great writers at the
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chicago tribune wrote for the suburban trib out there. he is a legend in that town. talk to anyone in chicago when you go back, i read your dad's columns growing up. then he gets a job at "new york times" and writes the about new york column from 1980 to 1987. people come on this show, well known "new york times" writers and best selling authors and a couple of them have said to me, i would read your father's column in "the new york times" and just retype it word for word to feel what it's like to write that well. and these are some great writers that you see in the front page of "the times" today. >> that doesn't help when you're on deadline. don't feel like a legend when you're sitting there sweating it out and having anxiety attacks on deadline. >> can we embarrass willie? >> please. >> what are your thoughts on willie today? >> well, i'm extremely proud of him. people ask what kind of kid he was. i say he was a tall child. >> thanks a lot. you see the problem here.
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>> good talk. >> but i think he's a great kid. he's humble, believe it or not, at home. he's just -- i said he has more finesse than i had. when i made jokes in the classroom i was sent out in the hallway for the rest of the day. willie manages to stay in the classroom. >> he is one of those. he's like barnicle. you're like that. >> no, barnicle's in the hallway. >> no, i was in the street. >> oh, no. you'd skate by. but he's a bright boy, isn't he? >> yes, he is. and we don't understand that either. there might have been someone else involved. >> birds and the bees. >> tall. >> may have been more than one bee. >> well, drones by the way i have researched the birds and the bees. and bees can have sex in midair and the drones mate with them
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and fall to the ground and die. >> this is the birds and bees conversation we would have had. they mate in the air and die. go get 'em. >> good talk, dad. that's the book. what a pleasure to have you on the show this morning. will willie's adorable, we're happy to have him. thank you for the good work you did as a dad even though you never talked to him. that's okay. we know the pollsters don't always get it right. on this primary day, we look at some of the most nor tor yotori failed political predictions. next. keep it here. ♪ captain: this is a tip. bellman: thanks, captain obvious.
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♪ it is not just the candidates who have a lot riding on today's elections. the pollsters who cover every inch of the campaigns also have a lot at stake. as derrick kitts reports, they're sometimes remembered more for what they got wrong than what they got right. >> political polling is a silence.
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oftentimes the results shape the candidates issues. who says the polling results are always correct? back in 1936 the literary digest predicted alf landon would beat roosevelt. that didn't happen. but it opened the door for george gallup who got it right. 12 years later the chicago tribune relied on faulty polling and ended up publishing a headline that couldn't have been further from the truth. it was harry truman who got the keys to the white house for the next four years. in 2004 just days before the election, polls showed john kerry with a four-point edge over president bush in ohio. but again, the polling was inaccurate with george w. bush claiming the buckeye state and another term in the white house. 2008 also saw its share of polling inaccuracies with five polls conducted just days before the new hampshire democratic primary showing barack obama to be way out in front. the pollsters, however, failed to inform then-senator hillary clinton who went on to claim the
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state by three percentage points. in 2012, it was gallup that incorrectly predicted a mitt romney victory. instead, barack obama went on to win the popular vote by more than 3 million. with so much being made of the polling in today's key elections, we'll be back friday to assess just who got it right and who got it wrong and what it could mean heading into november. >> thank you. cokie roberts, there are wrong polls and yet we follow them. why? >> well, because they give us some indication of what people are thinking and whoo i. and they're much more useful for that, frankly, than they are for predicting an outcome. but there are also good polls and bad polls. you've got to know which ones are which. it tends to be true that the media polls, the ones that nbc takes, abc takes are better polls than the independent polls. and the candidate polls, forget altogether. they are generally taken with a
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mission in mind and really should not be paid any attention to. but you've got to be good at knowing which ones to track and which ones not to. otherwise you will get it very wrong. >> steve rattner, politicians always say we don't care what the polls say. it just doesn't matter. we never look at them. >> well, they may increasingly be right. because one of the problems with polls is they're getting less reliable. as people move away from landlines and 40% of people in america don't have those anymore and they operate off cell phones, it's hard to get the information. you don't know who you're talking to. you don't get the same response rates. and finally a lot of the local newspapers that used to finance these can't afford to do it anymore. so the polling business they think is on facing the challenge. >> they are using cell phones. >> they don't get the same response rates. >> but good ones do have the models where they can correct
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for it. it really is poll by poll. >> wow. cokie roberts, always good to see you. thank you for being on the show this morning. see you in washington some time. still ahead, we go back to moore, oklahoma, one year after a massive tornado changed everything. thomas roberts will be joined by the state's governor mary fallon. plus congressman tom cole who makes that community his home. so we'll be right back with much more "morning joe."
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♪ all right. this story is all over the front pages of the major newspapers. there are new concerns about tensions between the united states and china. after a first of its kind indictment. five chinese nationals are now facing charges of allegedly hacking into computers of six u.s. companies and stealing trade secrets. the justice department says the companies included westinghouse,
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alcoa, and u.s. steel. they suspect they are part of a military unit that uses e-mails to install malware and the companies' computers. china is rejecting the allegations and accusing the united states of spying. the country is also pulling out of an agreement for the two countries to hold talks on cyber security. china has summoned u.s. ambassador max baucus and demanding he have the charges eliminated. where does this stand in terms of our relationship with china? >> not good on that front. but we've believed for a long time that the chinese were conducting industrial spying and stealing secrets from our companies. but for a long time, the companies didn't want to be named and we didn't do much about it. now they have moved forward. obviously there's a certain irony in this because of the nsa spying that also went on. we have created this sort of thin line of explanation that we only spy on institutions, on people that we thought were trying to do us harm. they are stealing trade secrets
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from us. these five people indicted will never come to trial. this is really kind of a statement of our new lean-in mode, if you will, on this issue. and it is a real issue, but we don't have a lot of leverage over the chinese. and it's not good for our relationship. >> up next, this weekend nascar champ kurt busch will be raicin more than a thousand miles. why he's doing it, we'll tell you next. ♪ for all kinds of reasons. i go to angie's list to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust.
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here with us any, 2004 nascar champion kurt busch, who will raise awareness for an important cause. really good to have you on the set this morning. he's drinking something like red bull but stronger. scares me. >> it's a monster java. >> uh-huh. all right. tell us about the double and how you plan to get through it. >> well, the double is the indianapolis 500 and the coca-cola 600 in the same day. three other guys have done it r before me but to me i'm a nascar guy. not many guys from the nascar world jump over into the indycar world. we've had guys from the indy side try nascar and i've really admired their challenge trying to jump to a different discipline in motor sports. so for me this is my only chance to run the indy 500 and we're doing it for a good cause. >> let's talk about the cause
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because there's so many reasons why you would be inspired to do this beyond the fact that it's what you love. >> well, it's memorial day weekend, and to me that's always been a time to reflect and honor and to give notice to our men and women who have served. on memorial day weekend it's a tough challenge to run 1100 miles in a day. when i feel like that i'm not up to the task or i'm about ready to fall out of the seat, as they say, i'm going to lean back on the experience that i've received from the military. my trips to walter reed, bethesda medical centers, seeing these men and women who have served, who have their arms blown off or their legs or struggling with ptsd. that's what the armed forces foundation does, focus on ptsd, posttraumatic stress, and helping our troops get back into civilian life and back up on their feet. this is inspiration i've received from them and i want everyone to know that i'm out there pushing hard for our military. >> what are the logistics of the two races? where are they held and how are you going to do this?
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>> the first race is in indianapolis. the race starts at noon. usually it's about a four-hour race. i have a two-hour window to get to charlotte for the coca-cola 600, the big nascar race. in between i'll be flying on a cessna jet. those guys have helped me get back and forth with all of the practice sessions so far so the logistics is a challenge, the race is a challenge and for me i have zero indycar experience so that's the fun part of all of this. >> and yesterday you lost your indycar. he had a wreck yesterday at indianapolis. >> that shows my inexperience with the indycar for sure. i qualified it at 230 miles an hour on sunday and then we had a practice yesterday and the car just slid away from me and i wrecked it. >> okay. >> so survived the wreck. that's part of racing. you don't think about the side effects of when you can or will wreck. >> have you got a backup car? >> i think patricia does. go ahead, steve ratner. >> so how do you think the indy thing will go?
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what's your prediction given where you'll finish? >> for me it's just pacing myself for that 500 miles. what i did wrong yesterday was i try to get into a groove to settle in and absorb the car and not, you know, overexert myself. well, that indycar will bite you if you don't give it full attention, so i didn't respect that indycar and the challenge that it presents every lap. so the mental side of the indycar is more important than the physical side. >> all right, you're driving this weekend the double to raise awareness for service members, veterans and their family members who deal with ptsd and other injuries, to recognize them and thank them. kurt busch, thank you so much. good luck. be good, especially with the part that you don't know. coming up, he's conquered action films and romantic comedies and now he's taking on westerns. actor liam neeson joins us on set. plus mayor de blasio is striking back after the city's papers attacked his wife with headlines that are frankly way out of line. and we'll go back to moore,
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oklahoma, one year after an f-5 tornado leveled that city. >> it's not destroyed, it's not damaged, it's not water soaked, it's gone. >> there's not a day that goes by that i don't -- that i don't talk to a person who's having trouble with this. does it ever go away? i don't know. >> sometimes i feel pretty worn down from all of it. it's been a tough year. when people just kind of question why we moved back, it just -- i sort of ghetto fended because, you know, this is my neighborhood. this is where i want to be. life with crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis
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good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a live look at new york city. you should get up now. mike barnicle is here, steve rattner is here and in washington we have eugene rob inson. in just a few hours voters will decide which candidates head to the general election in key battleground states. mitch mcconnell looks pretty secure against matt bevin but it's likely november opponent allison grimes who's poised to present a tougher task. she came out swinging at a rally in louisville. >> i am a kentucky woman who my republican colleagues have so generally referred to as an empty dress. that seeks to retire mitch
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mcconnell. mitch mcconnell fails to realize that it's labor that has lifted millions out of poverty. as he says no to collective bargaining, as he says no to prevailing wage. you will have someone in the united states senate who says right to work for less is just another work for union busting, and i will have none of it. >> okay. for mcconnell, it's not just about keeping his seat in the senate, he's eyeing the role of majority leader should republicans take control. >> there's only one thing we can do about it in 2014. in 2014, you can change the united states senate and make me the offensive coordinator instead of the defensive coordinator. >> a very different tone there. to shift the balance of power gop candidates need to win six seats. mcconnell thinks monica webbe may be one of them. >> i'd say for you women in the room, you'd love our candidate in oregon who's going to be
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dominated today -- tomorrow. their primary is the same day as ours. she's a female pediatric neurosurgeon whose slogan is change your senate, not your doctor. >> i guess that's opposed to she's a male -- she's a female? >> i think the words seemed awkward to me. >> he's an awkward guy. >> okay. female webbe, however, has faced a bruising end to the campaign with newly disclosed accusations that she harassed her ex-husband during their divorce back in 2007. he reportedly called the police and claimed she had pulled his hair, slapped him and threw items at him. i'd like to hear the whole story. on friday politico reported another man, a former boyfriend, accused webbe of stalking him last year. male, willie, take over. >> thank you, female, mika,
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appreciate it. that's quite an op-o dump at the end here. let's go back to kentucky where this obviously is about november. it looks like mcconnell and grimes will win tonight, we'll see. what kind of race does this shape up to be? this is as tough as mcconnell has been challenged right now. we're still five and a half months away from election day but you look at the poll, he's locked and he's worried about grimes. >> yeah, all the polls show this is a very close race in november. allison crimgrimes is obviously formidable candidate. she's a knfemale candidate at that, as mitch mcconnell might have noticed and pointed out. he's a crafty politician. he knows kentucky. he's got a lot of strings to pull. but he's in a really tough race and it's a funny state. it's basically a solid red state but it could elect a democrat.
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it's not beyond the realm of possibility. so this could be the fight of his -- of this phase at least of his political life. >> barnicle. >> gene, if memory serves me correctly there was a poll within the past six or seven weeks that showed senator mcconnell's internals were highly negative against him among republicans, which was kind of an interesting dynamic. i don't know whether his opponent's -- his democratic opponent's seemingly strength would account for the fact that suddenly after all of these years, steve rattner, he seems to be traveling with his wife more often than not. >> his wife is a very for midable character. she served in bush's cabinet as a secretary of labor and a real force of nature and gives him a personality, shall we say, that might not always be present in his absence. so he's bringing in the female. >> all right. speaking of females, my god,
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it's not like we're talking about your horses or something. it's ridiculous -- did mitch mcconnell say female? >> he did. >> can someone send him a note, seriously. i don't think he wants one from me. speaking of females, new york city mayor bill de blasio is defending his wife following a magazine profile where she discussed her struggles as a new mom. in an interview with "new york" magazine, she spoke about the challenges of balancing a career with the responsibilities of being a mother. she says about her daughter in part, this. i was 40 years old. i had a life. the truth is i could not spend every day with her. i didn't want to do that. i looked for all kinds of reasons not to do it. it took a long time for me to get into i'm taking care of kids and what that means. the tabloids pounced. "the daily news" said she did not want to be a mom.
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"the new york post" ran a headline i was a bad mom. the democrat called on the papers to apologize. >> i think it's deeply disturbing. i think it was inappropriate. it really suggests a tremendous misunderstanding of what it is to be a parent, what it is to be a mother. i think a lot of women are offended. a lot of hard-working women in this city are offended. i think both "the post" and "the daily news" owes her an apology and all of us an apology for absolutely misrepresenting what she said and for caricaturing a reality that i think so many women face. >> so it's -- i read the article. first of all, that part of it is this much in an article that was this big. it was much to do about her life as an advocate, as a ground-breaker, as wife of a politician, but also a partner who has a career in her own
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right and ideas in her own right and hopes and thoughts for the future in her own right. i found the headlines to be stunning. >> what century is this that we're in all of a sudden? you know, we have this this week, all last week we're talking about jill abramson, you know, mitch mcconnell uses "female" in that odd way. did i -- did i miss something? did we just go back 100 years? >> steve. >> "the new york post" went down. "the new york post" decided to take a short part of a long article, twist it around and put it on its first page because "the new york post" is after this mayor, shall we say. >> what -- i just wonder what's behind that. >> bill de blasio -- first of all, bill de blasio ought not to use the word "inappropriate." it's the most overworked word currently in the english language. that was offensive. it was more than inappropriate,
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it was offensive to any young mother with children. you can't help the feeling am i going to be handcuffed to the house for the rest of my life? you love your child, you care for your child but it's okay to have those feelings. >> i will say that she says what so many women feel. i felt it, absolutely. and the guilt that she talks about, lived with every day. it starts to steam roll into something worse because you really feel pressured between what society thinks you should be, which is completely in love with your kids 24 hours a day, seven days a week, something that by the way is not applied to a man. if you don't feel that way is there something wrong with you as a woman? because i did feel that way. >> but you are in love with your children, you're just exhausted because your husband is not there. >> and there are other facets to your identity beyond the fact that you have children. that's all she was saying, she had worked since she was 14 years old.
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that she knew how to do. what she didn't know how to do was to be tied to the house running around after toddlers and almost being hostage to them. >> i think maybe you'd agree with this, especially with your first child, because your entire life has focused inward. it's been all about you and your careers and your goals and all these other things and this person shows up and you love them more than you've ever loved anything in your life but it's adjustment. that's all she was talking about. i don't think that we should be surprised that it's on the cover of these papers because that's what they're in the business of, being provocative but this one went too far. >> some women say it they're just not married to the mayor who "the new york post" is trying to disembowel. >> the nba is moving forward with its plans to strip donald sterling of his ownership of the los angeles clippers. he has charged with contact that has damaged and continues to
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damage the nba hurting the league's relationship with its fans and owners. his lawyer has requested a three-month delay, which is unlikely to happen. sterling will have the opportunity to make his case to fellow owners at a hearing on june 3rd. if three-fourths of owners vote to uphold the charges, sterling will be forced to sell the clippers, as he should, willie. >> steve, donald sterling's argument is that you cannot just strip a person of their property at will. there has to be some case. we all knew this was coming, he was going to sue back and fight this whole thing, but there's no way come opening night in october that donald sterling is owning the los angeles clippers. all they need is a three-fourths vote from the owners. obviously going to get that. you have players like lebron james saying if donald sterling owns the clippers, i will not play in next year's season. there's just going to be a big fight along the way. >> one thing about this that hasn't really come out, there's
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a big tax fight involved in this whole thing because donald sterling bought that team for nothing. if he dies with that as part of his estate, he gets a step up in basis and avoids paying a couple hundred million dollars on that when the team is ultimately sold. he's not a well man as has also been reported. so i think there's a little bit of a subtext here of i need this in my estate because it's going to cost me an awful lot of money if i die first. but the end result, the contract between the nba and the owners seems crystal clear. there are plenty of other businesses where you can lose your license, lose your franchise, lose your rights if you're part of an organization and you have agreed to abide by its rules. >> it's been reprehensible for so long, really, just get it over with. moving on, with one of the most devastating tornados in american history, 24 dead, 400 hurt, and the town of moore, oklahoma, levelled. "morning joe" was on the scene
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hours after the storm hit and thomas roberts has made his way back there. thomas. >> reporter: mika, good morning to you. we do continue our live coverage here in moore, oklahoma, where we are coming back to visit the area most devastated by that ef-5 tornado that ripped through a year ago today. one of the areas most devastated was plaza towers elementary school which is behind me. seven children lost their lives there. joining me this morning is republican congressman tom cole of moore, oklahoma. this is your community, sir. it's great to have you with me. explain what you've seen over the last 12 months that's gotten us to this point today where we can stand in front of almost a fully completed plaza towers elementary school. what's the community spirit? >> you know, very strong, very upbeat. this place knows how to come back. we've had a tremendous amount of help. you've got to frankly credit the american people who have been here in force. we have terrific local and state leadership. federal government has done an excellent job. in the end it takes people to
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rebuild and we've got great people and they're putting it back together. >> reporter: obviously you have deep rots within this community and the people of moore and the people of oklahoma have deep roots within their state and their towns because they do rebuild after these severe weather systems move through. we know that the irony of the fact that it was in 1999 that an ef-5 came through moore at the same clip, almost the same trajectory of what we saw a year ago and the community rebuilt. here we are standing in this community near plaza towers and seeing homes go back up and hearing the noise of construction. what makes the families feel safe enough to want to come back and reinvest and rebuild? >> i think first of all they know this is a place that knows how to rebuild, that supports you when times are tough. people forget, as bad as tornados are, they're not hurricanes. a hurricane hits everything for hundreds of thousands of square miles. these are pretty tightly circumstance described paths of
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destruction. i've lived here through multiple tornados. my house has never been hit, i've been pretty fortunate, and that's true with the majority of people. but when they come, if you're in that path, obviously it's deadly and dangerous. >> reporter: and when we speak with deadly and dangerous, seven children lost their lives. this school did not have a storm shelter in place. it's coming back with a storm shelter that's going to be built to resemble a classroom so if the kids go into it it's not too jarring to them. >> right. >> reporter: but explain why there have been school facilities and other places that have been built without the money spent to put that precaution in when we know that this is in tornado alley. >> well, i think historically it just wasn't done here and wasn't done any place else in the midwest that i'm aware of as a requirement. but we've gone from two shelters in schools to ten in the last year. i think every school will have one pretty soon. lots of safe rooms, lots of
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reinforced buildings built. so people do learn tough lessons and that's something we should have done differently. >> reporter: it seems as though the governor we're going to have on later in the show talking about how this should be handled, keeping it from truly as local as possible. as someone who lives in this community, what's your thought on how local it should be when it comes to decisions about storm shelters and the rebates that go along with them, the tax rebates. >> i think the more local, the better. again, there's federal programs that help a lot that either incentivize or match prices or help people that can't afford them. there's state efforts and philanthropic efforts but i think at the end of the day people ought to control their own destiny and make their own decisions. people feel they're very much in control of their own lives and honestly they prefer it that day. >> reporter: and you're back to d.c. today? >> sadly so.
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>> reporter: later today there is a remembrance ceremony at the former moore medical facility. >> correct. this is our version, you know, of the oklahoma city bombing or 9/11. in this community this is a really impactful experience and honestly put us under a lot of pressure but brought us together, so it's my hometown, there's no place else i'd rather be. >> reporter: moore strong. thanks for making time for us on "morning joe." we'll check in with bill karins. it is a beautiful, gorgeous, sunny day. it's a little blustery but it's probably 68, 70 degrees. really nice. >> a lot better than a year ago, right, thomas? what's interesting, we were talking about with the storm that went through there, it's not like a hurricane but you can see in the picture behind me, this is where the worst devastation was. that's where the elementary school was down here at the bottom. only about two blocks over, those houses on the far right just barely touched but the houses in the middle of the screen were gone and devastated. that's how tornados work.
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it's unfair and there's a lot of guilt felt by a lot of people. you can be a block or two away and your house is fine. this was an ef-5. it was on the ground 39 minutes, 17 miles, and up to 210 miles per hour. we don't get many that strong. yesterday we did have one pretty strong storm in nebraska but that was about it. we saw some rain this morning through the great lakes. if we're going to get any damaging storms today, they're likely going to occur from areas around chicago to cedar rapids, heading down to indiana and ohio. again, not thinking tornados today. that will be wind damage with those storms. we're actually getting a little break from our tornado season. this is the peak month and we're in a little lull here and hopefully will stay in it. as far as the travel goes today, not many issues out there. we're looking pretty nice across much of the country and it looks to stay that way right through tomorrow. up next, the woman who wrote the big profile of mayor de blasio's wife that the new york tabloids twisted into
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[ male announcer ] to celebrate, visit your local benjamin moore dealer today and get $50 off every $250 purchase. interesting. we're back here. it does say here mom's glad she broke the taboo. joining us now contributing editor of "new york" magazine lisa miller who wrote the magazine's cover story pro fieg the life of new york city mayor bill de blasio. also the executive editor of
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"harper's bazaar," laura brown. good morning, laura. good to have you in here for this conversation. we've been talking about this all morning, lisa. >> i know. >> your piece is really making waves, but not in the way i thought it would. >> it's incredible, right? >> if i'd have read it, i would have thought a lot of other things that came out about the mayor's wife would have been fascinating, ground breaking and potentially, you know, even controversial. >> right. >> but not this. >> right. >> but maybe it's because i felt the same way. let me read the -- if i can say that. am i going to get burned at the stake? >> i think you're not alone and that's the point. >> so you write in "new york" magazine, mccray had always imagined a life with children. but as with so many women, the reality of motherhood, the loss of independence, the relentlessness of the responsibility was difficult of i was 40 years old. i had a life. will we feel guilt forever more?
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the truth is yes, but i could not spend every day with her. i didn't want to do that. i looked for all kind of reasons not to do it. i love her. i have thousands of photos of her. every one month birthday, two-month birthday but i've been working since i was 14. that part of me is me. it took a long time for me to get into i'm taking care of kids and what that means. did that strike you when she said it? >> when she said it, we were in -- around a conference table at city hall and there were probably four or five of us sitting around the table and we were all women and mothers. and she said it and we all sort of did a little hallelujah, like that is the truth. the truth is that when you're a new mother and you have a tiny baby, sometimes you can't wait to get away from the baby and that does not mean you don't love your children. you know, this is a perfect moment actually because she has spent her entire life saying the unpopular thing.
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saying the thing that is true but nobody wants to hear. this just blew up. >> it did blow up. when i read the article, it's way down deep in the article, it's subtle. it's not like you guys blew it out of proportion. and yet there seems to be an attack here, response, laura, especially in the local papers that is ugly. >> it's so offensive. and when she's articulating something that so many women feel and has united a lot of women this morning. all my friends are e-mailing and they say sometimes i was tired. i have a job, i have a brain, i want to go and work, i want to function. it doesn't mean less. >> or have to. that's the other thing, you have to. >> she's not running a pr campaign, she's living her life. just being a human does not make you a bad mother. and her speaking honestly and what i loved about the piece is it's a long read. she doesn't actually say so much. she's very reserved. she's thoughtful. she's articulating something honest and she just is being -- is being herself. the fact that -- i mean it's
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just -- it's surprising, but it's not surprising at all that this happened. >> but i think to some degree what we have is a very serious, thoughtful, articulate, interesting piece where a woman talks about all these conflicts and then you have a newspaper with a political agenda deciding to do it. it's hard to imagine -- it's hard to imagine that if this were john mccain's wife they would have taken this out of context, put it on the front page the way they did. they have a different agenda. >> they didn't start hating the de blasio's yesterday. it's part of a longer story. >> besides politics and not liking the de blasios politically, what else would drive such a vitriolic attack? >> mommy wars is such bait. you're a bad mom. it's such bait for everybody. >> with "the post" it's a constant agenda. it's a nearly daily agenda with the de blasios and the mayor specifically. but you said she is used to saying popular and unpopular things. in this case, she didn't say anything that is either popular or unpopular, she said something
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that is just truly realistic. >> new york city that's what i mean. she speaks the truth. >> you get exhausted after you have a baby. >> right. >> and the guy goes to work or your partner leaves. >> right. >> for a few hours. >> and people are so emotional about it. even women i was reading the excerpt and she was saying what did she say? what did she say? what did she mean? >> i looked at the headline and thought my god, she abused her kids. >> people get sensitive immediately. it feels like as a mother every minute your public self has to be, oh, they're the joy of my life. >> and she goes on to describe the years that followed where she was caring for her two small children and her aging mother and aging mother-in-law and she speaks like a woman who is really shouldering a huge amount of family responsibility. and, you know, she also speaks like a woman who's entirely committed to that.
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and so this is just sort of the real plight of women, of people. >> she's lived her life. this is what's so crazy. she's lived a huge, diverse, multi facetted life before she met bill, before she had children and now she has to come out of her door at 60 reading that she was a bad mother. >> i just wonder if there were other political wives this would be written about. i feel like there's something really obvious we're missing here in terms of what might have been driving this. but here's what maybe the article was supposed to be about in part and that is their partnership and her part in it. the mayor has called her the love of his life, his adviser. understand shirlane and you'll understand me. they have been described as virtual co-mayors. although their staff bristles at the term. the mayor is the mayor says a key aide, those who have worked closely with the couple describe mccray's role as really two
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roles. optics guru and political conscience. but that description undersells her brief. staffers call her the mayor's o mophie. they are inseparable. shees his gut check, his sounding board and doesn't a mophie also recharge? >> right here. >> it's wonderful to have a partnership like that. and usually it takes someone with substance to be a partner like that. and yet -- >> and to be fully accredited as such. they are united. and look what she brings to his perspective and he brings to hers. this is such a fantastic piece, but somebody in lisa's piece identified at the end of the piece said what a great brand you have. it almost seemed like she had not thought about it. but look what she is capable of representing. >> she was in pr and a speechwriter for a long time so she's fully aware of how her family looks and what she does for her husband. but she's not comfortable, you
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know, in the spotlight, in center stage. she's much more comfortable -- >> or if she's an optics guru, she knows she's not supposed to be in the spotlight necessarily, her husband is the mayor, so she's smart. >> so she's comfortable as the mophie, that's a good role for her. i think it's complicated because we haven't had a first lady in new york for a really, really long time and now we have one and she's entirely unlike any first lady in recent memory. and she's not even like the first ladies that we know. you know, hillary clinton or michelle obama. >> broke the mold. >> she's an entirely different kind of person. and this partnership, which is an authentic partnership, i think is confusing to a lot of people. >> i feel like they were trying to hit her where it hurts because this is where it hurts for women. >> 100%. >> whether you have kids or don't have kids, it hurts. i mean that one, i opened the article thinking i would read something horrific when i saw the headline and it was just the
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most honest, real statement i've ever seen. so i just wonder again what's driving this. >> what do you figure, is it resentment or fear of her that drives the feelings about her closeness in terms of her counsel to the mayor, her husband? >> well, i think it's -- i think that until we wrote the story and maybe still there's this sort of confusion about what the nature of the relationship is. if he's saying she's his partner in everything and if he's putting her name at the top of the org chart in the campaign, what does that mean in terms of her role in city hall? that's a real question. so part of what the story does do is explore the nature of the partnership and how do you have a relationship where he's the mayor and she's his partner and she's not the mayor and what she's doing every day. >> but isn't there also a little element of fear in the sense that people perceive her rightly or wrongly has being more progressive of the mayor in
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terms of her philosophy. >> i asked her about that. >> and if she has influence and pulling him that way, for people that don't agree, that's an element of fear. >> i asked her about that because that's some of the conventional wisdom that's out there, that she's the idealist, she's the true believer and he's the pragmatic politician and she keeps pulling him to the left. i said that's out there about you and she laughed. she said, you know, he's a pragmatist sometimes and i'm a pragmatist sometimes and he's an idealist sometimes and i'm an idealist sometimes and i would say it's a balancing act. and i did -- i did believe her. >> lisa miller, thank you so much. "new york" magazine's cover story on chirlane mccray is out now. laura brown, thank you as well. the latest issue of "harper's bazaar" is on newsstands now. >> who is that? >> kate winslet. >> oh, yeah, of course. >> looking lovely. >> as usual. coming up, it's the largest bank in the past 20 years to plead guilty to a u.s. criminal charge to the tune of $2.5
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>> what if ten million people approach google and say what if that story about be running over a rabbit on my bicycle drunk and naked, i want that removed. >> that is way too specific to be something that he just came up with off the top of his head. i guarantee you that there is a photo of that man naked on a bike thrushing a squirrel and if there isn't, frankly there is now. >> oh, no! even i wouldn't do that to brian sullivan. business before the bell now at cnbc's brian sullivan seen drunk and naked running over a squirrel? >> running over a squirrel. >> where did that come from up there, brian? >> first off, i need to address two things. number one, the guy in the picture is way buffer than me. he's got a six-pack. my wife saw that and said why can't you look like that in real life. and two, the picture is wildly
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inaccurate. my crocs are blue, i just want to throw that out there. we had a little fun, kudos to john oliver, they got me. that was fantastic. my friends and family are having endless amounts of fun with that. >> i just had a mental image with blue crocs. >> kudos to them. by the way, that was completely extemporaneous. let's talk about credit suisse, guys. pleading guilty to criminal charges of helping americans evade taxes. one of the first criminal prosecutions that we are going to be seeing. there's going to be about a $2.6 billion fine. this and the case a while back may pave the way, may pave the way for criminal prosecutions of american banks, according to "the new york times," so that is something to watch. bp losing an appeals court ruling to limit the amount of damages in that deepwater horizon disaster. they wanted to pay less on not go over their $7.6 billion
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estimate. a court of appeals in new orleans said, bp, you are stuck to that and whatever else you owe. and microsoft, they may roll out some new surface tablets. >> all right, cnbc -- >> i can't match the photo. business news seems boring. >> naked on a bicycle running over a squirrel in your crocs. >> i love squirrels, by the way, although they're all hoarders. up next, his next movie, a western -- oh. a western comedy -- please take that off. he admits to blushing while reading the script, liam neeson joins us on set next on "morning joe."
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>> your wife. >> oh, snap! >> look, look, look, before you kill me, just grant me a few last words, all right? >> make it quick. >> let anna live. all right? let her live. this is not her fault. i kissed her, she didn't kiss me, all right? it's not her fault. i mean she didn't tell me she was married, so it's a little bit her fault, i guess. yeah, i guess that's kind of true. maybe just shoot her in the arm? >> what the -- >> what? that was a scene from the new movie "a million ways to die in the west" and one of the film's many stars, liam neeson joins us now. >> that was one of the cleaner clips. >> really? we had a hard time choosing. how dirty does it get? >> we'll talk later. >> oh, my god. well, it sounds like it's fun. >> it's a funny movie. there's some hilarious things in
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it. >> you don't seem like a hilarious person. >> i'm the only one in the film that plays it absolutely straight. with a name like clinch leatherwood. >> you're the fastest guy and a bad guy? >> i'm after the guy that kissed my wife. >> who just happens to be charlize theron. >> do you blame me? >> not bad work if you can get it. you were saying you grew up on westerns. this is a different kind of western. this is seth mcfarlane. >> it's raucous humor, high school humor, but, yeah, i grew up on westerns. it was a dream come true to be in santa fe riding horses, shooting guns. >> raas an artist, schindler, t role of a lifetime but so many action things, nonstop, and now as an artist, what makes you go
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you know what, time for something a little lighter. what happens as far as the mechanisms that take you there? >> for me i'm always very flattered when a total stranger calls me up or asks for my number to say -- to ask would i be in their film. i'm deeply flattered by that, no matter who they are. in this case it happened to be seth macfarlane. i know who he is. a very, very bright, astute, intelligent guy. wickedly funny. so when he asked, he says i only need you for two weeks, two and a half weeks, it was a perfect gig. i couldn't say no. >> two and a half week shoot. >> not bad. >> for me. just for me. >> i'm going to show my softer side now. one of the ten best movies of all time, "love actually," what a beautiful movie. and your performance with that little boy, kudos, man. >> i just saw it the other
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night. i'm shooting in atlanta at the moment. i saw it for the first time all the way through. it's really, really sweet. >> it's a lovely movie, it really is. >> so you're doing "taken 3" right now. you have a very specific set of skills. >> still have them. getting a little slower but still have them. >> obviously is your daughter featured in this? >> daughter featured, my wife. >> so the whole family is back together. >> we had the daughter taken and then the wife taken. so from what i've seen you're out of relatives. >> absolutely. and if my daughter gets taken again, i could be up for bad parenting. that doesn't happen. >> so who's left to be taken? >> i can't -- >> oh, lord. >> the movie is "a million ways to die in the west." that was good. >> will be in theaters on may 30th. liam neeson, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> more "morning joe" in just a moment.
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welcome back, everybody, to moore, oklahoma. as we continue to update you one year later from the tornado-ravaged region of moore, how this town is rebuilding, how the people have healed, how
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they're coming back stronger than ever. i'm honored to bring into our coverage the republican governor of oklahoma, mary fallin. thanks for making time for us. i know it's a busy day. a day of reflection, a time to remember those who were lost but also a day to celebrate the healing that's going on. oklahoma remains one of seven states that does not have requirements to have mandated storm shelters for their schools. we're standing in front of plaza towers. seven children perished in this school last year. what type of advances and safety procedures can you assure to parents that you're making in a state like oklahoma that this won't happen again, that we won't lose children? >> we've done a lot of things and certainly today is a day we don't want to forget. there were some several tragedy that struck our state, loss of life, loss of children, loss of property, certainly injuries throughout our state. so what we've been doing is analyzing our schools. we've done an assessment of all
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of our 1800 structures in our state to look at whether they have storm shelters, whether they don't. whether they have a safe place that's fortified or won't be fortified to be able to stand a normal tornado in the state of oklahoma and then we've been working on legislation that is going through that would allow a vote of the people to allow local school districts to have an increase in their bonding capacity if they reach their credit limit to be able to put in storm shelters or safe rooms. there are some schools that have storm shelters so they might want to put in safety precautions from, say, intruders who might come into their schools. we're hoping to get that done in the next week and a half. >> time is running out. how confident are you that you'll get that done because you're getting push back. >> i've been pushing really hard to get that bill to a vote of the people by the end of next week. it's very important. it's our only step that we have available to us in this legislative session to have the ability to put in storm shelters in our schools. >> you've been very vocal about
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trying to keep everything on a local level, but when it comes to the federal level, we know there was support from the president, obviously support from fema and from the red cross. how has that been for the people of moore over the past 12 months as this community rebounds? >> fema has been great to work with in the recovery process itself. one of the things we have done in our state since 1999, we have utilized fema money that we have received over many different storms that we've had in our state and been able to put in 12,000 new individual storm shelters into homes through a matching grant program where people get about $2,000, match it with their own personal money, so we've put a lot of new storm shelters in our state. but this program that we've been talking about would allow our local communities to put shelters into the schools themselves. >> for you, you're running for re-election coming up in november. how i guess parental do you feel about fostering this rebuild, this regrowth for the community of moore? >> well, my husband and i have six children between us and i
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can still remember coming up on this site the night of the tornado when it hit. it was about 11:00 at night. i drove up and all the first responders were moving stone by stone, brick by brick, sawing through the metal, having concrete jackhammers trying to see if there was anybody else under the debris itself. so as a mother, it's a very emotional issue for me that we do everything we can to give communities the opportunity to be able to decide what's best for their individual schools. what can they afford. how do they want to do it and to be able to enhance our safe rooms in our schools. >> well, we know that this is a resilient community, that's for sure. we can tell by all of the regrowth that we've seen over the year how much people love their community of moore, oklahoma. so it's so nice to have you. thanks for making time for us. we're going to let you get back to work because we know you have a very busy day. governor mary fallin, we appreciate it. we'll be back in a moment with what have we learned today, after this.
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not just "everything at the hardware store." not "everything, until you hit your cash back limit." quicksilver can earn you unlimited 1.5% cash back on everything you could possibly imagine. say it with me -- everything. one more time, everything! and with that in mind... what's in your wallet? and with that in mind... alright, that should just about do it. excuse me, what are you doing? uh, well we are fine tuning these small cells that improve coverage, capacity and quality of the network. it means you'll be able t post from the breakroom. great! did it hurt? when you fell from heaven (awkward laugh) ...a little.. (laughs) im sorry, i have to go. at&t is building you a better network. so when my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis them. was also on display, i'd had it.
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i finally had a serious talk with my dermatologist. this time, he prescribed humira-adalimumab. humira helps to clear the surface of my skin by actually working inside my body. in clinical trials, most adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis saw 75% skin clearance. and the majority of people were clear or almost clear in just 4 months. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of cancer have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure have occurred. before starting humira, your doctor should test you for tb. ask your doctor if you live in or have been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. tell your doctor if you have had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have symptoms such as fever, fatigue, cough, or sores. you should not start humira if you have any kind of infection. make the most of every moment.
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ask your dermatologist about humira, today. clearer skin is possible. now to a consumer alert for cabela's customers. the outdoor retailer is recalling 1600 of these, jerky blasters. they say the battery charger adapter could overcharge, causing it to overheat and start a fire. >> thanks, eric.
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critically important information, folks. the jerky blaster's battery charger adapter can overheat. also, there is something called a jerky blaster. time now to talk about what we learned today. mike barnicle. >> well, i learned america, treat yourself, by this book. >> great book. >> by the geist brothers, father and son. "good talk, dad," you'll have a million laughs this weekend. >> that was a great segment. >> you stole my line, america, buy this book. father-son. >> and i'm just going to point out the obvious, but it's just so interesting to hear the term used. i'm going to start using it too. we are two males and a female. >> mitch mcconnell. >> i am a female. i am a female news anchor. okay. that was a little bit out of touch. jen, did you think that was weird? just a -- hmm? talking about politicians as a female, what was she, a
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neuroscientist. >> you wouldn't say let's go get a male on the show. >> no. we need more males. god, no. all right. if it's way too early, what time is it? it's time for "morning joe." now it's time for "the daily rundown" with chuck todd. have a good day, everyone. welcome to your primary day pregame. the biggest day of voting before november. kentucky's clash leads the way as mitch mcconnell and allison grimes talk like the general election is under way. we'll talk to matt bevin. we'll also talk to jack kingston about his hopes for a runoff in georgia and a look at why some notable '90s names want to head back to the house after so many years away. and does dynasty equal destiny? allison grimes isn't the only legacy candidate on the ballot, but how much can name sake knowledge pave a path to victory. good morning from washington. it's tuesday, may 20th, 2014. the day we've been waiting for for some time this year.

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