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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 28, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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you know i could do this all day. i really could. but i won't. i won't. okay. one more. one more. know i could do this l day. i really could. one more. donald trump calls african-americans thugs, muslims terrorists, latinos rapists and criminals and women bimbos. hillary clinton believes racism, hatred, injustice and bigotry have no place in our country. she fights for us. >> i have to say, i do just love to see how she gets under donald trump's thin skin. >> good morning. it is tuesday, june 28th. >> june 28th. >> yes. >> oh, my gosh. you know what meacham was telling me june 28th. it was a massive day.
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it was, as jon said, the battle of sullivan island, the first in 1776. >> i feel like there's something on the schedule. >> the first decisive victory over brits. >> they were fighting over the restaurants in charleston. >> the creation of carolina day. >> okay. >> from the battles of today. that happened today. >> that's not what i was talking about. with us on set we have managing editor of bloomberg politics and co-host of "all due respect." i watched it in its entirety. >> i did, too, the whole hour. >> it's an all new episode. mark halperin, former communications director for george w. bush nicolle wallace. >> she's great. >> pulitzer prize winner jon meacham is here as well. >> carolina day is today because of the battle of sul advance
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island. >> yesterday -- >> i don't even get nerd humor. >> they are idiots. don't listen to them. did you see what happened yesterday, nicole? >> it was on mark's show. what happened? >> ice in the country, 300,000 people. >> iceland is green and greenland is ice. >> and the hearts of britain are black this morning, what a horrible, horrible display. >> worse than brexit. >> the worst in the history of english soccer. >> ochblgt i was actually talking about what happened in ohio where the democratic presidential nominee teamed up -- you didn't like it? >> no, i didn't say that. >> you had a little scowl on your face. >> liked it fine. >> senator warren and hillary clinton, they teamed up and took on donald trump. before their joint appearance
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trump sent out a tweet saying crooked hillary is wheeling out one of the least productive senators in the u.s., senate goofy elizabeth warren who lied on heritage. yesterday it was warren who called trump goofy. >> donald trump says he'll make america great again. it's right there. no, it's stamped on the front of his goofy hat. you want to see goofy, look at him in that hat. when donald trump says great, i ask, great for who exactly? for millions of kids struggling to pay for an education? for millions of seniors barely surviving on social security. for families who don't fly to scotland to play golf? when donald trump says he'll make america great, he means make it even greater for rich guys just like donald trump.
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great for the guys. who don't care how much they have squeezed from everybody else. great for the guys who always want more, because that's who donald trump is, the guy who wants it all for himself. watch out, because he will crush you into the dirt to get whatever he wants. that's who he is. >> i am so delighted to be here with my friend and a great leader, senator elizabeth war n warren. and no one works harder to make sure wall street never, never wrecks main street again. i got into this race because i wanted to even the odds for people who have the odds stacked against them. and this is not a time for half
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measures. to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top, we've got to go big and we've got to go bold. let's set the goal of making sure wall street and the wealthy pay their fair share of taxes. >> so you noticed that, her sharpness on wall street. >> you always catch me, the things i say when we're not on tv. >> i noticed it, too. >> i thought -- i got uncomfortable listening to the things elizabeth warren said about wall street, which were captured in her first book, with hillary standing right there. i thought it was proof -- i thought it was almost a victory lap she pulled clinton over to this. >> right. but then you said you got sweaty -- >> i got nervous because that really wasn't hillary's message until she got into hot water rainfall it's become her message, but one of many. what elizabeth warren is doing
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is focus what one of hillary clinton's messages has been but it's been hard of her. >> she hangs out with gazillion aires. she's one of them. let's talk about elizabeth warren. this is what she does best. >> years ago we did something at fenway park. was she running for something? >> yes. >> she was just so good. it wasn't even this, what she can do so well, attack mode, it comes from the gut. donald trump represents everything she's fighting. it's perfect, natural. she's really good with her roots being from oklahoma, she's really good connecting on a personal, intimate, honest level. she's not afraid to like really share her background, if you read her book. i think she's extremely useful
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for the clinton campaign. >> she really is, mark halperin. oklahoma makes harvard here. it's a powerful combination. she absolutely loves going after donald trump. it's one of the things publicly she has done best since she's gotten on the national stage. >> she's great at it. it's strange -- >> what is she great at? >> she's unafraid of him. >> it's everything she is to fight back. >> her ability to capture for a lot of the electorate the things people are made uncomfortable by donald trump. it's amazing to me that no one else in the party has really matched her for that. >> nobody does. not only this party, jon meacham, but the other party. i find myself watching elizabeth warren going after donald trump saying why is she so good at it, and everybody else is so bad at it. whether you agree with elizabeth warren or not i'm talking about
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prizefighter matching against prize fighter. nobody can beat the crazy southpaw donald trump but she goes in and jabs. she's really good at it. >> the senator from massachusetts cannot be unapologetic democratic voice, the democratic party should close up u know, ted kennedy played that role. that's a place where her base is fairly -- her actual electoral base is small and devoted to her. she's an interesting midpoint between the specificity that senator sanders ran on. it was very easy to identify his message. free college, single pay, whatever it was. senator clinton less so. she sort of warms her up without going all the way over to the center. >> she reminds me, twitter might break when i say this but just bear with me for a second. what palin did when she joined the mccain ticket is not dissimilar what warren does when she joins hillary clinton. mccain was establish men,
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steady, can do the job but didn't fill stadiums. clinton is steady, can do the job. she does not fill arenas. warren provides that electricity on the stump. >> the early days when sarah palin actually was, and people don't remember this now because she's so absolutely horrific on tvs. >> she packed arenas. >> she packed arenas. >> she attacked. >> this is the question. what is it about elizabeth warren -- and i'll add sarah palin -- that they step onto the stage and they are big. i'll give you an example. like scott walker. i love scott walker. >> we'll get to him. early on i said scott walker is kind of my guy. maybe i'm with him, maybe i'm with jeb. but i always worried. will scott walker be able to fill the big stage. what shocked a lot of us about sarah palin back in '8 and
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surprising a bit about elizabeth warren she steps onto that stage and i'm not saying she's bigger than hillary but she's as big as anybody on the national stage when she gets behind the microphone. why is that? >> it's not surprising at all to me. >> chat about this. >> let's talk about this. >> i'm trying. >> go ahead. >> it's not surprising at all. i'm trying. i really am. >> you've known her a long time. >> i've known her a long time. you look at her -- sort of her trajectory, she has been since she was at harvard obsessed with the concept of bankruptcy and what's going on with america. >> from watching her parents, right? >> from watching her parents. sitting in bankruptcy court writing a paper and watching families come in and realizing they look like her, they look like you, they look like everybody else. this was a problem. america was getting screwed. she knew it decades ago.
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she creates consumer protection bureau. she gets run out by republicans because the president is too weak to keep her in there. you know what she does? she runs for senate. she's not going to run away. >> i'm talking, though, not about her quality, i'm talking about filling the stage, performance. why is she led zeppelin. you get them on the stage, they fill the stage. what is it about elizabeth warren, and i was asking this yesterday, why does she fill the stage like led zeppelin. >> she's like palin, unapologetic populist unafraid of the establishment. >> unafraid. >> and there's no doubt, this is a comparison to palin is constructive. no doubt being a woman and being able to stand up to the establishment, which is mostly men, is electrifying, it really is. it's conviction versus calculation. >> like bernie sanders. >> she has these convictions.
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she doesn't have to worry about how it plays in a purple state. she can help senator clinton with the people -- extraordinary number of people in the democratic primary who weren't excited about her. >> donald trump -- >> by the way, you have seen this all along. i guess that's why this question is so elementary to you. you've been saying she was going to be her vice president all along. so maybe this is just obvious to you. to me seeing her, though, on stage, owning a stage, the way that politicians -- the way politicians don't own the stage but very few do, she's got something. >> and they had more chemistry than i expected. i thought -- that to me was the revelation yesterday. people to me talk about how they personally dislike each other. i don't know if they do or not. but on stage -- >> hillary has this thing, she wants to win. i think they can act.
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>> i'll tell you one final thing, i love tim kaine. if i were hillary clinton i'd want tim kaine to be my vice president. i understand why popular for people in the party, but the more i saw elizabeth warren on the stage yesterday, the more i thought how dull in the other pick elizabeth warren will be. i hope they are polling her and i hope she's coming out well in the polls. if not, she's going to make her vp pick look like a dud. >> there was obviously -- can you imagine all the surrogates that came running to donald trump's defense yesterday in the attacks against him. wow, boom, boom, boom. one after the other. so there was a lineup of big names, people that wanted to defend the republican presumptive. >> nobody was there. >> scott brown was there talking about dna tests. >> you only need a couple. >> pickup truck guy? >> ancestry.com.
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>> got it. >> boston. ancestry.com makes sense because he wants elizabeth warren -- >> where are the surrogates. >> somebody needs to be a surrogate with credibility. >> so donald trump fought back withly beth warren's attack. i hope she selects her as vice presidential running mate. i'll speak openly. she is one of the least productive senators in the united states. we call her pocahontas for a reason. she said she was native american. she used it for her career. i think she's racist. what she did was very racist. nicole closing her eyes. former senator scott brown held a bizarre press conference organized -- i know they were
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sad they organized this, republican national committee where he suggested that dna testing may have to come into play. >> we all know she's not native american. she's not 1/32nd. she has no native american background except for what her family told her. the easy answer on that, as you all know, is that harvard and penn can release the records. she can authorize the release of those records. she can take a dna test. she can release the records her self. there's never been any effort. >> this is when you know you're losing. a debate. when your opponent is talking about working class americans, fighting hard to bring working class americans back into the mainstream of american economic life and you are talking about
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whether someone is 1/32nd native american and talking about dna testing. this is so bizarre. this is june 27th version of the trump university nonsense that happened yesterday. june 27th version of trump university nonsense. what the hell is wrong with them. are they stupid? are they stupid? >> they say they are going to turn the package. >> turn it. >> toward the general election, more elegant. you can't if your candidate is releasing ridiculous cartoon-like kindergarten-like statements. >> here is the deal, if you're going to turn the page, turn the page. they are trying to especially the muslim ban. turn the page, can't keep turning back. can't keep moving forward. that's the discipline. they have to be disciplined up and down the line. this pocahontas nonsense, goofy nonsense. >> doesn't work. >> doesn't work. makes them look small.
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we're in the general election. anyway, trump campaign issued a press release calling warren a sellout for ignoring clinton's ties to wall street. quote, this attempt to pandering to the sanders wing is another example of a typical political calculation by d.c. insiders. that actually is good. that's a great statement. that's what they should have done, mark halperin, instead of this stupid pocahontas dna bs, talk about how hillary clinton has been captive of the wall street elite for decades and made millions and millions and millions of dollars pandering to wall street personally and politically. put that statement out. forget the pocahontas stuff and, boom, you've got a good counter-attack. they didn't do it. >> i think trump is going to give a speech on trade and i don't know how hillary clinton is going to position herself. it puts her on the defensive. a lot of people to vote for her
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in ohio and pennsylvania. if they do, that they are focusing on issues in real life with real people and not punching down with mockery one of her surrogates. pretty clear to anyone watching the strengths and weaknesses. >> by wait, it works if you're going up against weak republicans who don't know how to fight back. it does not work anymore against elizabeth warren. just leech it alone. she will come back and punch you in the face and get the better of you. >> also evidence to me there's no traditional campaign. if it were, the surrogate operation would get in touch -- that was a strategic message. you have to pick a message. running against john kerry there was an internal debate about how to go against him. we nu we would lose if we couldn't settle on one. one line of attack and you repeat it every day. >> they are getting there.
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>> they had a surrogate. >> they are moving on the muslim ban, mass deportation. they hired ted cruz's communication guy. >> they have got a surrogate. scott brown. >> yeah, okay. anyway, they are moving in the right direction, but the problem is you've got to be all in. you can't be -- i'll tell you this. if they yesterday had just gone after hillary clinton's wall street ties, elizabeth warren would have had nothing to say. she would have been on the defensive because she knows hillary clinton has been a captive of wall street along with bill clinton. they are chummy, closer to wall street than anybody in politics. >> we could have looked at what elizabeth warren said in the past about hillary clinton and wall street. >> if they had money, they could have put up a web video, an ad, a little buy.
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i think in her first book she writes about clinton era policies on wall street. firing on all cylinders could have brabted thcketed that effe. >> i think they are moving that direction. >> you think clinton can make this bid? >> i've been saying no for a long time. >> he has to. >> i think they can. i'm starting to think they can. i think yesterday we saw a confluence of the old and the new. i think you're going to see the new pushing out the old, which is basically somebody having the power to tell donald trump, stop tweeting. >> right running mate, strong convention, first debate. >> couple of surrogates would help. >> strong communication director. we shall see. i think i'm starting to believe
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because they survived three or four of them, horrific weeks, the polls, they understand it's a near death experience. if everything i'm hearing up and down the line in that organizati organization, they get it. donald is donald. tomorrow he may set his hair on fire. >> no. he would never do that. >> by the way, have we noticed -- i know somebody has, both boris and trump, their hair. it's unbelievable. >> it's the same. >> it's the same hair and they have both completely trashed the elites in their respective countries. by the way, i've got to say the british elites are even more clueless. >> so much worse than ours. >> they are so clueless, so contemptuous. i'm just saying, so contemptuous of the people who voted to leave. i love what the queen asked,
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tina brown reported this. everybody is sitting there saying it's so awful, we're leaving. the queen looked up and said, give me three good reasons why we should remain connected with the eu. silence. of course, nobody is going to tell the queen. i'm sorry, it was a one-sided deal that helped the eu. these elites, british elites over the past 48 hours have just showed how clueless and out of touch they are with the people. >> still ahead on "morning joe" we'll dig into "wall street journal" polls that break down attributes of trump and clinton. >> honest and trustworthy. >> split right down the middle. >> trump wins in a landslide honest and trustworthy. >> supreme court overturns conviction of former governor bob mcdonald. the ruling from the high court, unanimous. >> it's disgrateful. we said it from the beginning.
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this was disgraceful what the justice department did. >> said it when it wasn't cool to say. >> the guy didn't violate a single law in virginia. the justice department went out of their way to go after him. whether you thought what he did was sleazy or not, it wasn't a crime. they put those people through the ringer for two years. we called it day one. that is a frightening, frightening abuse of federal power and the supreme court unanimously said the same thing yesterday. >> while all eight justices. >> what the justice department did was disgraceful. >> also this morning he's warned of the vast consequences of brexit. former british prime minister tony blair joins the table. >> we're going to talk to him about what happened with iceland yesterday. >> that was just awful. he should maybe, yeah, be humiliated. first bill karins, speaking of humiliated. >> horrified. >> i've got something new for you guys next time we go to ft. worth. >> i'm there every other week.
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what have we got? >> this is what we're going to do next time we're in ft. worth. this was yesterday on bailey's street. that looks fun. >> good lord. >> she's all by her self and very happy and proud. >> i'm usually by myself. that will work for me. >> that was ft. worth dallas area, obviously some flooding. we to to the yankee game, it's not often i wake up at 2:00 in the morning and the yankee game going on. the game was delayed in the top of the ninth inning. they didn't resume until 2:15 a.m. the game finished around 3:00 this morning. that rain is now moved out. still getting soaked. atlantic to delmarva. another round of storms. cold front back to the west. through new england we are going to get a round of storms this afternoon. people at risk. d.c., richmond, scattered storms. more concentrated around redding, stranton, nordwards, timing around 4:00 to 5:00 p.m.
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albany, schenectady, hudson, new york, d.c. as we go through 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. rest of the country stirred storms in the south and very hot in the west. 102 in salt lake city. that is near record highs. so new york city, some scattered showers this morning around thunderstorms likely this evening. look at the empire state building cut in half by that cloud deck. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ americans are buying more of everything online. and so many businesses rely on the us postal service to get it there.
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people tell polsters they don't trust me. i don't like hearing that. i've thought a lot about what's behind it. you hear 25 years worth of wild accusations, anyone would start to wonder. it certainly is true. i've made mistakes. i don't know anyone who hasn't. so i understand people having questions. now, maybe we can persuade people to change their minds by marshalling facts and rebutting
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arguments on negative attacks that doesn't work with everyone. you can't just talk someone into trusting you. you've got to earn it. yes, i could say that the reason i sometimes sound careful with my words is not that i'm hiding something, it's just that i'm careful with my words. >> hillary clinton sounding good in chicago yesterday reflecting on why some voters have doubts about her. there are polls that back thaup. first we want to bring you sad news this morning, we just found out legendary basketball coach pat summitt has died. in a statement posted on her foundation's website, stated the iconic coach passed away peacefully this morning after a courageous battle with early on set dementia, alzheimer's type. as a player, summitt led tennessee to two national tournaments and u.s. olympic team to a silver medal in 1974. then at the age of 22, she
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became the head coach of university of tennessee knoxville's women's basketball team. over the next 38 years, she led the lady vols to eight ncaa championships, 32 conference titles. and in 2005 became the winningest coach in the history of men's and women's d1 basketball. she was named ncaa coach of the year seven times. >> wow. >> and may smith coach of the century in 2000. in 2012 she received presidential medal of freedom. she took on the issue of dementia and alzheimer's, created a foundation with her family. pat summitt was 64 years old. >> mika, you told the story about her wanting to get back to tennessee. >> yes. she was in labor with her son, and they were going to land the plane. she said, no, get me home. i've got to have this baby in tennessee. she seems -- she was really cool. >> your home state, just a
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treasure. >> as you know in a region dominated by legendary sports figures from bear bryant forward in sports and the role of women in sports and a giant in tennessee. >> and tough. all right. we'll have more on those polls we're talking about after a quick break. we will be right back. is 22 pages long. nsurance y did you read every word? no, only lawyers do that. so when you got rear-ended and needed a tow, your insurance company told you to look at page five on your policy. did it say "great news. you're cono. it said,age five? "blah blah, blah blah blah blah blah..." the liberty mutualpp with coverage compass makes it easy to know what you're covered for and what you're not. see car insurance in a wholeew light. liberty mutual insurance.
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poll numbers in the white house. >> this is exciting because we haven't had one in months. >> i think this is really interesting. >> it's amazing. fascinate because it's moving so fast. just kind of moving. >> i'm going to punch him. is that okay? >> this week's survey monkey online tracking poll shows hillary clinton leads donald trump by eight points, 49 to 41%, her highest advantage since the general election. matchup question was first asked on may 2nd. >> by the way, this one may be a little more accurate. i think msnbc poll with democrats, the abc poll just oversampled democrats, which is outrageous, which is why they had barack obama with an 87% approval rating and nbc had him with a 51% approval rating.
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why would you go plus 12 where the generics aren't showing plus 12. it was outrageous. i don't know why abc did it. but i think this 8, 9 point poll, that sounds about right for me. >> meanwhile new nbc "wall street journal" shows where the candidates are strongest. trump leads in attributes like changing washington where he has a 30-point advantage over clinton. has he a 16-point lead in being honest and straightforward. >> let's stop right there. >> i can explain this. >> let's stop right there. if you're hillary clinton and you're looking at this poll and you see you're at 25% being honest and trustworthy and donald trump is beating you by 16 points when he appears to be making things up as he goes along, what do you think? mark halperin? what do you think that 41% of americans think donald trump is honest and trustworthy and only 25% -- mika has her theory,
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we're going to get to that one. >> mine is the correct one. i'm not sure why you're not coming to me first. >> she spoke to me yesterday about why people in the past don't trust her necessarily. these are -- if you took candidates name off and said republican is leading at a time when people are looking for change and authenticity, republicans leading dramatically in those areas, you'd have to be worried if you're democrats. there are things hillary clinton is strong that matters, too. this is why a lot of people in the trump organization are quietly confident -- >> i want to get to this. honest, trump 41, honest, clinton 25. mika explain. >> because hillary clinton says oh, i've been attacked. i've been attacked. after years and years of attacks -- no, don't play the victim. i like the second part of what she said. but she's been focused on being attacked a little too much. >> donald trump. >> donald trump is honest about
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the fact he's dishonest. he's like, hey, this is me. i say this, i say that. i'm donald, i'm honest about it. >> i don't even know what that means. >> you know what it means. >> i've got one friend who comes over every saturday morning around 8:00 to talk to me about how he's feeling about trump. >> great friend. >> he walks over and says he's disgusting. >> i say who are you voting for? he says, donald. i think these numbers also show even though people are mad at him they are going to vote for him. >> they are with him. >> it's like music fans. like bieber fans, even when they are gross, they are still their fans. >> jon meacham, i heard it all weekend, too. people said i'm embarrassed by him. i can't believe how horrible he's been the past month. people that really liked him a month ago. he's disgussing. he's this, he's a liar. so you're not voting for him? what, you expect me to vote for
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hillary. yeah, of course i'm voting for him. >> that's a big point. there was a moment a month ago now where a republican in my native state, very much an establishment figure said what about my man trump. it was all about the fact that if he's the nominee, hillary is the embodiment of everything they have been fighting for a quarter century, fairly or unfairly. i do wonder on the points -- the numbers there, i wonder if honest and straightforward, i wonder if some people hear that as blunt. >> i think so. >> for sure. i think his time is running out. on this, i think pocahontas stuff and all these statements that are like quick snap to respond to a attack personally on twitter or blurt out something. there's a time line on that and time line is soon over. >> so hillary clinton is ahead by 24 points when the question goes to who can handle foreign
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policy best. 54-30. she's had 14 points on uniting the country, up 12 points on who would be a good commander in chief. >> voters also trust her over trump in handling a crisis. the candidates are statistically tied on who would be effective at getting things done. trump at 42% and clinton at 39. >> man, the tale of the tape is pretty much down the middle. >> go back up, if you would, the traits where he's winning. you'll see on the top three, changing washington and the big ones where he's ahead, she's trying to fix those. she's talking about changing things, standing up to wall street. she addresses straightforward things and dealing with the economy. that is the big one. she's trying to fix those three and narrow those gaps. >> he's ahead on national security and terrorism by 5 points during what has been the worst month of his candidacy and the best month of his candidacy. these numbers are stunning. >> they are stunning because it shows how important if we keep
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these numbers up, shows how important it is for donald trump to get his personal problems straightened out. his temperament problems. on the biggest issues, if you name the four biggest issues, number one is changing washington. he is winning in a landslide. number two, fixing the economy. he's winning by double digits. the third one, terrorism and national security, he's winning that one, too. i mean, let's just say the top three issues. donald trump is actually winning comfortably in those issues. why is he still losing? it is all temperament. it is all personality. it is all people saying we can't trust this guy to be commander in chief after what we've seen the last month. he's got to fix himself. >> and when people are voting and they are on the fence and they are in that booth, they don't want to be scared. they will go with the candidate that doesn't scare them. >> especially women. they aren't reckless. >> by the way, that is why george bush won in 2004 when everybody in new york and you
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name it, everybody thought john kerry was going to lose. they were disgusted by george w. bush. it was all safety. we feel safer with that guy than we do with john kerry. >> up next, the fall out from brexit continues. senator says he plans to introduce legislation inspired by the referendum. he joins us next. real is touching a ray.
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from brexit continues to be felt around the world. some lawmakers calling for a new trade deal between the u.s. and uk. joining us republican senator from utah mike lee. his book, "our lost constitution" is how the today in paper back. good to have you back on the show. >> thank you. >> senator, how are you feeling about donald trump. i know you were a cruz reporter.
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you've been watching and waiting to wrap both your arms around our party's nominee. what's your take on the trump candidacy. >> so i have not endorsed mr. trump. i'm still looking for a presidential candidate who will embrace constitutional reform agenda. >> looking where? you're still looking? you're open to someone else getting in at the convention? >> it seems very unlikely at this point. you know, what mr. trump could do is embrace some of the principles of federalism, separation of powers, the principles i address in my book, "our lost constitution" the same principle that made "hamilton" wildly popular, same movement, play that put his image on the $10 bill really could come into play in this residential election. i think they would and i think conservatives would start to rally more aggressively behind donald trump if he started to make these part of the forefront of his political message as a presidential candidate.
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>> might you not vote? might you take the jeb bush position and simply not vote and vote for republicans down the ticket? is that an option for you? >> look, it's an option for everyone. i don't know that that's an option that i would pursue. i'm still hopeful that our nominee, whether the presumptive nominee or someone else will take and embrace this message. look, federalism and separation of powers are the principles and foundation of the constitution that have made this country great. they are neither republican or democratic. these are simply american principles. we've benefited to the extent we embraced them in our government. we've neglected them over the last 80 years as i explained in "our lost constitution" we'll benefit again when we embrace them. donald trump has a big opportunity. he pitches himself as a reformer, as a change agent. this would help to give some teeth to that and i think this is an opportunity for him. >> senator, who do you think is going to be elected president of the united states in november and why? >> it's really difficult, really difficult to predict at this
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point because we are so far away from that moment. we have yet to see the inner play between the democratic nominee and the republican nominee even though we probably know the identities of both of them, there are still some uncertainties there. we adopt have the genuine chemistry that emerges once you have -- >> the polls you've been showing this morning show hillary clinton with something of an edge. yet as you pointed out in your analysis of the polls, people are trusting hillary clinton to speak plainly. they are not trusting her as a change agent in washington. and so that's one of the things i think makes it a closer question. >> you have actually been supportive, one of the few people i've heard public figures been supportive of britain's decision to leave the eu. why? >> so what they experienced in the uk last week, what they have experienced the last few years that convinced them to make this change last week was the fact
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they were subject to a large, distant centralized power. a centralized power that was becoming increasingly intrusive and increasingly bureaucratic. bureaucratic in the sense there were laws that were foisted upon the people that were developed by unelected, unaccountable, distant bureaucrats. so this something that people in great britain reacted to in an understandable way. >> actually, they just kept getting worse. this is one of those moments where u.s. policymakers -- we always do it with israel. we force israel into deals that we would never take in a billion years in the united states. but presidents force is really the deal because they want to win a nobel prize for peace. we would know more subject our selves to distant regulations from brussels than we would turn texas over to mexico city. isn't it outrageous how hypocritical americans are
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judging the british for doing what we would never have allowed our selves to get into in the first place? >> absolutely. in fact, it's one of the reasons why i've been working on legislation i plan to introduce this week that would maintain u.s. relations with great britain even after the brexit, notwithstanding this decision. would maintain status quo as far as trade relations with them and direct the administration to start negotiating a bilateral trade agreement that would follow the brexit. again, some of these same principles that are at play here in the united states. it's different and yet there are some more trends. the american people, as i explained in my book, are increasingly finding themselves subject to large centralized power, becoming increasingly aggressive and bureaucratic. the good news is we have our own constitutional system that with reign this in. we have our own system that came about in part because of the efforts of people like alexander
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hamilton whose speech at the constitutional convention i describe at length in my book that gives the power to the people. as long as we reinvigorate this document, the people remain in charge in the united states. >> you know, i always took you as a really mad zan man, but i guess 'tis the season to talk about hamilton. so front page of the "new york times" talks about a devastating loss for pro-life forces. justices overturned texas abortion limits. there has been the belief for some time in conservative circles this court was going to continue moving towards outlawing abortion bit by bit, piece by piece. that certainly belief was blown out of the water yesterday in this decision was it not? >> yeah, i believe it was, particularly given the fact this outcome came about and this outcome would have come about, notwithstanding the death of justice scalia.
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in other words, even if justice scalia had still been around, it appears this outcome would have been exactly the same. this the first time since 2000 in a case where the court has taken this type of action. so we're talking about roughly 16 years since this type of action has occurred. and certainly it is being perceived, correctly, i think, as a significant setback for the pro-life movement. look, these were restrictions, health and safety restrictions imposed by the state of texas. simply dealing with proximity to an admitting hospital, simply dealing with health and safety standards applicable to an outpatient surgery facility. a lot of pro-life activists and a lot of people were just interested in maintaining the public health and safety of the people of texas who were confident in this case. yet the supreme court sought to
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intervene. i don't think it was warranted but the outcome we're faced with. >> obviously the court and kennedy could have found a rational reason why the state would decide to put some of these regulations on abortion clinics if they had chosen to. it wasn't a reach at all. they had an excuse. they decided not to take it, and i think it's really significant. >> his book is "our lost constitution." senator mike lee, thank you very much for being on the show this morning. >> thank you, mike. >> thank you. >> ahead in our next hour, we'll be joined on set by former british prime minister tony blair. also ahead on "morning joe" -- >> i do just love to see how she gets under donald trump's thin skin. >> hillary clinton and elizabeth warren team up to take on trump while trump turns to warren's former senate race opponent scott brown for the response. "morning joe" will be right back. what are you doing?
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this election is about values, donald versus hillary. donald trump believes in defrauding students to benefit himself. hillary clinton believes every student should get an education. donald trump believes poor sad bangers need to be free to defraud anyone they want. hillary clinton believes we need strong rules to prevent another
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financial crisis. donald trump cheats his workers and wants to abolish minimum wage. hillary clinton believes no one should work full time and live in poverty. donald trump calls african-americans thugs, muslims terrorists, latinos rapists and criminals, and women bimbos. hillary clinton believes that racism, hatred, injustice and bigotry have no place in our country. she fights for us -- she fights for us, and we will fight for hillary clinton. >> as we all know she's not native american. she's not 1/32nd. she has no native american background except for what her family told her. the easy answer on that, as you all know, is that harvard and penn with release the records. she can authorize the release of those records. she can take a dna test. she can release the records her
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self. there's never been any effort. >> welcome back to "morning joe." >> wow. >> here you see a tale of two campaigns. one that's trying to turn the page but hasn't turned the page yet talking about darn and the other giving an impassioned speech about being inclusive. >> the differences. >> pretty extraordinary stuff. scott brown, what was that? i don't know what that was. whatever it was, they need to pack that away, put it in a box, pack that away, put it up in the attic and not bring it out again. as far as elizabeth warren goes, she has now, if this were a broadway play, somebody would come on the overhead -- come on the system and say, playing the role of bernie sanders for the rest of the campaign, elizabeth warren. she has stepped into that role. bernie waited too long.
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she's the one. >> we have manager of bloomberg politics mark halperin. chairman of the american conservative union and former political director for president bush, in washington pulitzer prize winning columnist and associate editor of the "washington post" and msnbc political analyst eugene robinson. >> matt, did you bring your sample. >> no, and i didn't bring my pulitzer prize either. >> you came empty handed. >> it's all right. >> feeling inadequate. >> gene robinson, did elizabeth warren and hillary clinton impressive you yesterday? >> they did. that's a fairly dynamic duo. look, she's really good at this. she's really good at getting under trump's skin and she's good atri rallying the troops ia way -- i'm trying to think of anybody else on the democratic side who has been so successful
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sounding those notes and anim e animating the troops. i think warren has got it. >> i can't think of anybody on the democratic or republican side, mark halperin, who is as good at going after donald trump than elizabeth warren. >> your friend howard dean. >> howard is great, but howard -- i think elizabeth warren is uniquely qualified to go after trump day in and day out. >> i wonder if the republicans, 16 republicans who failed to stop donald trump look at that. a lot of those lines are something they could have used. wonder why they couldn't have been as -- >> they were scared. >> they were all scared. they played it too safe. they were all in a bok. here you've got somebody mad. it's a great combination of somebody who is part harvard but part oklahoma. she grew up in oklahoma. when she goes after trump -- i've always said, george w. bush with that texas swagger that he had would have cut trump into a million pieces with one look in
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the first debate. >> i liked jeb but it was the wrong bush brother. >> going up against trump. this oklahoma thing she's got going for her makes her powerful, matt, right? >> i agree with eugene. i think it's a powerful combination. i think the key, though, here is for that crowd, she's clearly playing to the base of the party, that crowd it works. give the other 16 republicans a little benefit here, which is in front of that republican and conservative crowd, the themes trump was hitting were very appealing to that crowd. it wouldn't have work as well. >> gene, it's very much her background from oklahoma, her family, the book she's written, what she studied in college and what she's done every since then from creating consumer protection bureau to running for senate, she has a story, like bernie sanders that matches a message that hillary clinton very much needs to make sure people see as part of her message. >> yeah. it's definitely an asset to
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clinton to have warren. she does have that oklahoma vibe going for her that's really tough. it has that swagger about it. and you know, the thing about hillary clinton, obviously, from the figures you've been looking at, people believe they know her. they have formed opinions about her. and you know, frankly, for a lot of different -- those feeling are kind of lukewarm. yeah, i'll vote for her. warren, i think, if the democrats are going to win, they are going to have to get their base excited. i think warren does that. >> yeah. she certainly does. we have new head-to-head poll numbers in the white house race. this week's nbc survey monkey online tracking poll shows hillary clinton leads donald trump by eight points, 49 to 41. it's their highest advantage since the matchup question was first asked on may 2nd. meanwhile new nbc "wall street journal" poll shows where the
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candidates are strongest. this is so interesting. trump leads in attributes like channing washington where he has a 30 point advantage over clinton. he has a 16 point lead in being honest and straightforward. >> gene robinson, explain that one for us. that's why we have you on. >> i have no idea. donald trump as you know says whatever arthritis across his mind, true or not true or made up. >> he has an image as a straight shooter. he shoots in every conceivable derrek. he has an image as a straight shooter. hillary clinton has an image as a triangulater. look, that's what clinton is up against. on the other hand, as you saw from the overall numbers she's got eight points on him now and heading in the right direction.
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>> he hit on hillary clinton's fundamental problem. american people, i think republicans and democrats, a lot of democrats i talked to, know that if donald trump shoots straight, she shoots crooked. and they just feel like she's got a second set of rules for her. it the way the clintons play the game. it's why the sanders movement was so potent in that party. >> you said something fascinating under your breath while we were reading the polls. you said it's not about him. >> that's an indictment on her. >> this is a referendum on 40 years of her. >> we're looking at donald trump, my god, he's doing, this that's not the right way to do it at this point in the campaign. it's really about this 20-year relationship america has had with the clintons and at this point in history do they want to go with that. i think there's a lot of people who don't. >> they didn't want to go with the bushes. a big question whether they want to go with the clintons. i want to go with three numbers, though. if you had to pick three numbers
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that matter the most in any poll right now would be number one changing washington. number two, who is going to fix the economy. number three, who is going to keep us safe from terrorism. trump wins all three, mark halperin, pretty easily. >> he does. but the downside of his attracting all this attention when he was running for attention, downside, time running out. >> time running out. you like to say this is about her. to an extent you might be right. this is a man who hasn't been on the political scene that long so he hasn't run out the clock on some of the most ridiculous things that have ever been said in the history of american politics that have come out of his mouth. as that progresses, if he does not stop, if he does not find a really measured tone, get a band of surrogates, get some policies that make sense to conservatives, he is not going to be able to keep these numbers. >> matt, i think you agree, he
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needs to get out of his own way. >> after everything you've said those numbers about the attributes on key issues, they are surprising. no matter what has gone on in this campaign on the issues that are the most important issues in the campaign, he's doing staggering well. >> he is but we haven't had a debate yet. on the economy and terrorism she's going to crush him in the debates. she's going to crush him. i'll just say it right here. >> you really think so. >> yeah. >> oncome on, guys. >> elizabeth warren will crush him. give him his due yesterday he made some big staff changes. what he's got to do, really staff up. a key staffer from the ted cruz campaign. that ted cruz relationship is very important to him. >> by the way, talking about his communication's guy. >> jason miller, who is a very talented guy. alan cobb, someone who has been involved in politics 20 years, they are starting to make some of these changes. it is late. i understand you're looking at
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this and saying come on, guys, get with it. >> mika, you shocked me here? >> why? >> you sound like the people you made fun of in the primary when you said, crush is going to get crushed in the debate. >> i didn't say that. you're saying other people say that. >> back then. but now you're saying hillary is going to crush trump in this debate. >> she is. >> how many debates did we see where we go, oh, that wasn't good for donald. then the polls would come out, not even online polls, major polls would come out and say donald won. >> most of those debates said, seems bad but he's probably going to win or win in the polls. i think there was one debate where we were slightly off. i will tell you this is one-on-one. this is going to be very much like the democratic debates that you saw between hillary clinton and bernie sanders where they actually talked at length in-depth for many, many, many minutes on the issues. i just don't think he can do it. >> gene robinson, october 1980,
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a lot of people were certain ronald reagan would like the dunst, b list actor he'd been, dismissed as fastest gun in the west, the guy that was going to start world war iii and jimmy carter was going to debone him. it didn't quite work out that way. you can't tell what's going to happen in the debates. >> no, ronald reagan -- people forgot ronald reagan had been governor of the largest state for two terms. he knew something about politics and he knew something about what he was doing and he was the great communicator and his unique way. trump communicates, too. >> nobody was calling him that in 1980. they were calling him a bumbling fool in 1980. >> we know this in retrospect. we know he had a way of reaching people. we don't know -- what we know about trump is he had a way of
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reaching the republican base as a visceral level and motivating them and surprising the political world. and we know he has, you know, this "godzilla" aspect about him, which is traditional political attack seem to make him stronger rather than weaker. what we don't know about trump is in that debate setting before the entire nation he's going to have anything like that or whether he's going to freak people out. you know, he is freaking a lot of people out by the crazy things he says. >> all we heard, he had 17 people on stage with him so only had a little amount of time to speak. that's a big advantage for him. what did we learn, in all the interviews he's done he's going to build a wall, a great wall. he doesn't answer how he's going to build a wall. he's going to have great teams, surround himself with people, he does deals. that's what we've gotten in months and months and months.
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>> he's going to have to up his game. >> there's a pendulum effect here in american politics for what this rule is worth. it's been 68 years since we've had -- more than eight consecutive years of one party rule. hillary running as did he facto president and we've only had two of those succeed. yeah. >> yesterday was a big day of decisions from the supreme court. one of those decisions was a unanimous one to throw out former virginia governor bob mcdonnell's conviction on bribery charges. the former republican governor because convicted of 11 counts of public corruption in 2014. prosecutors claimed he accepted gifts and loans worth more than $175,000 in exchange for promoting a dietary supplement. but mcdonnell insisted he never took any action to benefit the company and the gifts them selves were allowed under virginia law at the time. the justices all agreed that the federal government failed to
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prove that mcdonnell performed an official act in exchange for loans and gifts. chief justice john roberts wrote the opinion saying in part, there is no doubt this case is distasteful. i may be worse than that. but our concern is not with the tawdry tales of ferraris, rolexes and ball gowns, it is instead with the broader legal implications of the government's boundless interpretation of the federal bribery statute. the case was sent back to the lower courts to decide if prosecutors have enough evidence to try mcdonnell again. his wife marreen was also convict convicted. her appeal is pending. the supreme court ruling also applies to her and her conviction should be immediately tossed out. you said all along -- you said it when it was not cool onsay it, awkward to say it, you said this was bogus. >> from the very beginning i
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said i was stunned this governor, as unbecoming as it might have been, did not violate a single law in his state. the federal government went out of their way to swerve out of their way to run him over, to take up jurisdiction in his state where all the states ethics commission said he did not violate any laws. and then go after him this way and convict him. and said at the time it was simply an outrageous abuse of conduct. this has been happening. the justice department has been criminalizing politics for a decade now. i know a lot of people out of the abramoff affair that actually were investigated for eight, nine years and their lives ruined and then the justice department said, go on. there's nothing there. another case of a dear friend of
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mine who was hammered and finally struck a deal just to move on with his life. was run out of washington, d.c., his life was destroyed. he goes in front of a federal judge. a federal judge looks at him and says, why are you here? he said, your honor, i don't know. he goes, i'm sorry. basically, go, go in peace. this has happened time and time again over the past decade. this is only the highest profile example of it. it's disgrateful that the justice department did what they did. and mcdonnell has been destroyed. he's been destroyed politically, he's been destroyed economically because you had a federal government that stuck their nose where it didn't belong. >> matt, thank you very much. eugene robinson, thank you as well. i'll be reading your new column in today's "washington post" which looks at why brexit is a cautionary tale for trump supporters. >> speaking of matt, he's got five daughters.
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poor guy. we're talking about my two boys getting married, five daughters. >> so many. >> that's terrible. >> let me tell you, it's -- i don't even want to think about it. >> are you going to go for the son. >> talk to my wife. >> speaking of brexit, former prime minister tony blair is going to be with us right after this and right after current prime minister david cameron yesterday dashed the hopes of those wanting a new vote. something much, much worse. england's performance against iceland breaking british hearts around the world. >> cast in the uk as george castanza and jerry seinfeld. >> this could have been a huge mistake. >> doesn't sound like you completely thought this through. >> i guess not.
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what should i do? >> i think you can just go back. >> go back? >> yeah. >> pretend like it never happened. >> you mean just walk into the staff meeting on monday morning like it never happened. >> sure. you're an emotional person. people don't take you seriously. >> just go back, pretend the whole thing never happened. >> never happened. >> i was blowing off a little steam. so what? >> so what? you're entitled. >> i'm emotional. >> that's right. you're emotional. >> never happened. >> never happened. ♪ ♪ americans are buying more and more of everything online. and so many businesses rely on the us postal service to get it there. because when you ship with us, your business becomes our business. that's why we make more ecommerce deliveries
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. >> okay. i can finally smile. that was a very excited icelandic announcer. >> kind of exciting. >> england suffered actually the most embarrassing loss in
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history. the smallest nation ever to compete in the tournament. there were people comparing this to 1950 when the united states beat england in the world cup. but i don't even think -- i think it's worse that that. tony blair, would you agree with us, sir? >> i'm afraid it is. it's worse than that. to go after two things european in one week is a little careless. >> admit it, you can try to act as serious as you want but actually yesterday hurt worse than brexit it's awful. for the world champ we've still got teams in. >> let's move onto brexit and the vote. why did the majority of your fellow countrymen leave the eu.
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>> it's the same type of popular vote we've got everywhere. it generated enormous feeling. it took the country over and they won. >> were you shocked? >> yes, i was. i was very surprised. i thought we would vote to stay because i thought the case for staying was overwhelming. you know, there are two interesting things that came out of this campaign. first, we're going to be britain, a realtime real life experiment. watch very carefully over the next several months. first of all, the people who wanted us out said, look, it's going to be fantastic. this thing is going to work wonderfully. secondly they said in all those people telling you that it's not, it's going to be a disaster, the establishment, elite, they don't know what they are talking about, you threw them to one side and went to us. so we're three days into it. our stock market has crashed.
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our pound is the lowest level since 1980s. we've had our credit indicating downgraded. things are looking different. by the way, britain is a great country, resilient country, a great place to come to, invest. >> right. >> we'll come through it whatever happens. but if you look at where we are today and where we were promised we would be on thursday, three days has made quite a difference. >> so i'll ask you the question that the queen reportedly asked dinner guests last week, give me good three reasons -- name three reasons why we should remain in the eu. >> because half of our trade is with the eu, so our goods and services, our jobs depend on it because it gives us a huge political reach in a world that's not just -- where america is the most important power but now with china, india, huge population countries. thirdly, because it's the biggest political union, largest commercial market in the world
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is right at our doorstep and it's smart to be part of it. >> let me ask you if you were prime minister tomorrow and you had to live with this reality, you knew there wasn't going to be another vote, how would you leverage britain's new freedom in a positive way to turn this disadvantage into an advantage. >> the case for leaving. >> i know that's a tough one to answer. >> it is tough because personally a lot of the people who were wanting to leave are saying we'll become an independent country. i was prime minister for 10 years. i can't think of a single big decision other than those directly concerned with europe that europe made me take or told me i couldn't take. i think what will now happen is that the claim and counter-claim is all going to fall away and now you're going to be faced with reality. we're a realtime, real life
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experiment in politics. >> is boris up to handling the crisis many thinks he created. >> we'll wait and see. i hope -- he's obviously got to play a big part in how we negotiate this. we've got to have some relationship with europe because we need it. we need it commercially, politically and in security terms. one thing i will say is i think there's a lot that will play out in next weeks and months. we decided what we want to do. the strange thing about the referendum is like swapping a house for another house. you didn't actually see the other house. you had a claim and counter-claim people who said they are going to see it. now we'll see the reality. what does this new relationship look like? what does it really mean for our business. does the stock market and financial markets settle down. do we or don't we? this has a long way to play out.
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i don't think personally we should take any irrevocable decisions at this moment. >> many thought boris acted irresponsibly during the leave campaign. would you agree? >> i disagree with what he said strongly. so yes, i think that campaign was -- based on things that disintegrated quickly. whatever we do in these six months, i think we'll come through it and come through it fine as a country. i wouldn't write us out of europe yet. there's a lot still to come. the question is what type of relationship. i wouldn't rule anything out, let's wait and see. >> do you see a parallel with what's going on here in america with donald trump and the support he's getting and what your country has gone through. >> i think there are parallel
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between your politics and our politics but this happens all over the world right now. conservative movements, left and right. insurgent movement took my political party over in the uk, for example. in a sense, went for bernie sanders model. now we're will in turmoil out of this result. a lot of the same types of themes you can see in your campaign as well. >> will corbyn survive? >> i'm not involved at all. that's something for the parliamentary party back home. what i'm saying is if you look at u.s. and uk you see all these similar themes. by the way you could go to france, germany, italy and you'd see exactly the same. >> it's been 25 years, the new democrats came to power here, new labor under your leadership. the intellectual arguments seem to be won for globalization. this argument seems to be in worse shape. would you agree with that?
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how do you bridge that? >> no, i think that's absolutely right. i think for people like myself in the center ground of politics and think center left and right cooperate and work together who don't like this sort of insurgent populism because we think it's not really going to deliver for the people, i think there's a big responsibility on us in the center to get our act together, to work out radical but serious solutions to the problems people face. because otherwise what happens, someone comes along and says i'll fix it. you say how are you going to fix it? you say, i'll fix it. you see that left, you see that right. in the end, you know, those of us who have been through government and know what it's like, it's not that simple. i think the center ground has got to become the people of change again and not guardians of status quo. that's the weakness that comes through in our campaign, you can see it in your politics, you can see it everywhere. >> of people who potentially are next to become prime minister,
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who do you think is equipped best to deal with the turmoil. >> i don't know. we have to see where they really stand on this. in particular we have to see whether they are going to put an ideological conviction on europe before the genuine interest of the country, because the interest of the country since half of our business -- overseas business is with europe and since europe is so close to us in so many ways, we've got to maintain a relationship. i think the most important thing is for us to be adult, mature about it. the people have spoken. we have to take account of that. let's make sure over the months to come that we see the real options for our future. as i say, we will -- we're not going to be looking through a glass anymore. we're going to be face-to-face with this new reality. that i think will influence the british people a lot. there's another thing by the way as well. it was a close vote. okay. 52% to 48. the 48% who wanted to stay, they don't really have a political
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home at the moment. that's going to be also the question in a strange way is when you get this populism taking over, not just parties but in our case on this decision a country, does that more center ground opinion start it's self to get quite angry about a situation? >> you've spent time at yale over the past several years talking to students. so i want you to educate us here today. pretend you're talking to your yale class and explain what's happening in western democracies. why is it the elites in washington and new york and london, why are we -- i'll say we -- so disconnected from the rest of the country. i always talk about donald trump's campaign and nobody thought he was going to win. i had to drive to a wedding in stranton, pennsylvania. i got west of nayak. i walked into a target.
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i looked around for three minutes. i got on the phone and called mika and said, donald trump is going to win. we're all in our bubbles. why is it -- how is it elites in britain missed this coming just like elites in america missed donald trump and bernie sanders. >> it's a really good point. i'm tempted to say if i could figure it out completely i'd be running again. >> but that's not true. >> that's not going to happen. but i think it is two things. i think people feel their incomes have been flat lining for a long period of time. they feel the next generations opportunities are not going to be -- >> that's it. >> -- an improvement. i also think social media allows insurgent movements to gain scale at speed. so it's a combination of the these movements are there for very real reasons. that's why i say the elite looks
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out of touch. look, we'll manage this for you, we know best. we'll sort it out for you. because people don't believe that will meet the case for change and they want real change, the social media and the way the relationship between people can come into a sense of belonging very quickly, that then itself is a revolutionary phenomenon. you see this around the world. you can go to literally any european country and have the same discussion. >> and you can sit at home for two days sweating over an op-ed that you were going to put in the newspaper, place it in the newspaper, and then somebody puts out 140 character tweet. >> blog. >> or a blog competing on the same level. you're right. social media picks up at such a pace, almost over emphasizes the power. >> right. >> sometimes arguments that aren't fact-based.
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>> what i don't know is whether there is a way politically that you can beat away these -- some of these populist movements because in the end i don't think they really do provide answers. they ride the anger but they don't really have the answers or whether this is an experiment we're just going to have to go through first. >> wow, that's some experiment. former prime minister tony blair, thank you very much. great to have you on the show again. >> go wales. that's all we have left. >> later this morning we're going to check in on wall street which is trying to rebound after a few tough days and seeing some green for the first time since the brexit vote. we'll be right back. trolling for a gig with braindrone? can't blame you. it's a drone you control with your ain, which controls your thumbs, which control this joystick. no, i'm actually over at the ge booth. we're creating the operating system for industry.
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up next an outsider that shocked the political world, congressman joins us with his take on the outsider who has now won his party's nomination for president. we'll be right back.
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not unusual. he beat eric cantor, the rise of the anti-establishment candidate. congressman writes about it in his book "american underdog." so with trump, do principles matter? is that what we've got? >> i hope so. we're trying to firm that up. it is tricky. >> you're trying to firm it up, though. >> our republican brand hasn't done too good with principles, too. you've got the rise of this anti-establishment. both sides need to convince the american people going to raise their wage rates instead of being flat for 30 years. no one has been convincing. >> that's right. >> what does trump need to do to firm that up? obviously he's been all over the place on issues over the past 0 20, 30 years. what does he have to do for you. >> when paul ryan was running i
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encouraged him to put 10 things down. not vision, he's god at it. newt gingrich moderating, new contract with america with paul ryan, put 10 things down on paper we need to do. >> any progress? >> it's coming around. people want to see that. i ran on six republican principles in virginia. my people hold me accountable. if i don't, i got calls, e-mails and they say, hey, dave, you promised this. >> do you think trump is truly pro-life? >> yeah. >> do you think he's a true and principled protector of the amendment. >> yeah, on that one i'm 100%. >> you think he's sufficiently conversant in the language of conservatism. >> he met with evangelicals, a thousands thought leaders on capitol hill, i think received pretty well. >> why do we have jeff flake and other guys completely unconvinced, sufficiently unconvinced who say they won't vote the top of the ticket or won't vote him. >> you need particulars.
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people want to see 10 promises. establishment promises balance the budget in 10 years. it's not balanced. we've got $500 billion deficit, $19 trillion debt. >> you think he's going to get down to the particulars of a budget plan. >> you look at trump's budget, actually he explodes the deficit and the national debt. >> but the announcement effect and paul ryan did a great job this week on his tax proposal, big bold move, small business lower, just the announcement effect of that. i don't think it's going to make up millions. the reason trump is on the rise is because the problems are so dire. >> right. >> the main point from my stump speech, in 10 years all federal revenues, right, and this is vbo, all federal revenues only go to mandatory spending programs. >> you've got donald trump, though, despite the fact that medicare, medicaid, social security consumes every dime that goes into washington, d.c.,
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over the next decade, you still have donald trump saying he's not going to touch social security, he's not going to touch medicare. he's not going to do what you and i both know you have to do to save those programs and save america from ruinous debt. >> if what he means by i'm not going to touch them standard republican position everyone is safe. >> what he means is he's not going to touch them. he said you paid in. i'm not going to cut your benefits at all and attacked republicans, like you, who during the primary said they were doing to be responsible. >> you have more certainty than i do. that's the debate we've got to have. when he finds out in 10 years there's not a dime for national security and he wan to be pretty firm around the world, there will be some tension there. when he finds out there's no money for education, transportation, running government, in 10 years you have to deficit finance the whole government. cbo that's their forecast $1.2 trillion deficit spending in 10 years. so the debt is 30, if you feel the burn it will be $40
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trillion, just the debt. $100 trillion. by the way, the biggest trade-off is the thing no one mentions on the left, they supposedly care about the children all the time, right? the children are the ones that are going to get whacked. i was professor. they are not going to get medicare and social security. >> what they are going to get is the most massive tax increase in the history of the united states of america to try to pay off these programs that are going bankrupt. mark. >> the smartest person donald trump could pick as his running mate politically? >> i think newt. politically savvy, ahead of the curve in terms he's got more books out than anyone up there . >> el ron hubbard had a lot of books, too. aren't you afraid he's going to burn the house down.
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>> what about temperament. >> i get a kick out of that. you've got hillary and warren, right, the kind, gentler, they call trump every name in the book and he says pocahontas and he's in the dirt in the media world. come on, they are all adults. they are going back and forth hard. there's always a double standard left, right. they are calling him every name in the book, a crook, doesn't care about kids and all this stuff, a bunch of bologna. he's a nice guy. democrats on the hill say they know who he is. he's been here 50 years, it's not a mystery. >> they like him? >> of course they like him. he's been a democrat a lot longer than a republican. he's contributed to half of the people there. >> hillary, too. >> what do you think the morning
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after brexit when we're watching for our party's standard bearer to have something to say about it. you had a lot to say after sort of -- you condemned the elites. trump went out and talked about two suites in the lighthouse that were really awesome. what do you think when you see the standard of our party giving a hotel instead of speaking -- >> in some ways she a genius. the average person, they say that and say that's cool. brexit did offer up the perfect line here. the three books are the christian tradition, magna carta and free markets come out of adam smith. if they get back to that formula and we get back to that formula i wish they would evemphasize t
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things that made this country great. >> you think paul ryan might be up against the same kind of thing? >> i don't think so. he does the, you know, family stuff every week and all that kind of thing but he is going to be in trouble in the sense that he has to come to grips that we have been talking trump but on immigration and on brexit here it is a huge issue and just the basic numbers. >> do you think paul may be out of touch? >> i think the leadership -- you know, the budget instead of doing re -- with no house involvement by 400%. that is tone deaf right now. >> sounds like paul has work to do back in the district.
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we all have work to do today, reading american underdog, proof that it matters. greatly appreciate it. the race for president and ha hallie jackson joins us with new reporting. we'll be right back. in one chewable tablet. try new duo fusion. from the makers of zantac.
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still ahead on "morning joe" warren relishing her --
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democrats in the house benghazi panel say millions of dollars has been squandered into the investigation into the 2012 terror attack. today house republicans will release their own report. gowdy will join us. "morning joe" is back in a moment. pitch you investment opportunities. i've got a fantastic deal for you- gold! with the right pool of investors, there's a lot of money to be made. but first, investors must ask the right questions and use the smartcheck challenge to make the right decisions. you're not even registered; i'm done with you! i can...i can... savvy investors check their financial pro's background by visiting smartcheck.gov wiback like it could used to? neutrogena hydro boost water gel.
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one more. donald trump calls african americans thugs, muslims terrorists, latinos rapists. hillary clinton believes racism, have no place in our country. she fights for us. >> and i must say i do just love to see how she gets under donald trump's skin. good morning. it is tuesday, june 28th. >> june 28th. >> yes. >> oh, my gosh. june 28th a massive day. it was the battle of sullivan island which was the first in 1776. >> i just feel like we have something on the schedule. >> the first decisive victory over the brits. >> they were fighting in charleston. >> exactly.
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and the creation of carolina day. >> okay. >> that happened today in 1776. >> that's not what i was talking about. we have cohost with us today. i watched it in its entirety yesterday. >> i did too. i said the same thing. >> it's an all new episode. >> you have done some things. >> i agree. >> former communications director for george w. bush. >> he is great. >> it will be a long morning. >> thanks. >> and john mitcham is here as well. >> the battle of sullivan island. it was big. >> fort sumter. >> i don't get it. are you kidding? >> they are idiots. don't listen to them. did you see what happened yesterday nicole? >> what happened?
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iceland, 300,000 people. >> and they beat -- >> the hearts of britain are black this morning. what a horrible display. >> worse than brexit. >> the greatest in english soccer. >> i was actually talking about what happened in ohio where hillary clinton teamed up -- >> i wasn't talking about that. >> you didn't like it? >> i didn't say that. >> you look like you have a little -- >> no. > >> well, they teamed up. trump sent out a tweet saying crooked hillary is ruling out one of the least productive senators in the u.s. but at yesterday's event it was warren who was calling trump goofy. >> donald trump says he'll make
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america great again. it's right there. no. it's stamped on the front of his goofy hat. you want to see goofy? look at him in that hat. when donald trump says great, i ask, great for who exactly? for millions of kids struggling to get an education? for millions of seniors barely surviving on social security? for families that don't fly to scotland to play golf? when he says he'll make it great he means he'll make it greater for rich guys like donald trump, great for the guys who don't care how much they already squeezed from everyone else. great for the guys who always
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want more because that's who donald trump is, the guy who wants it all for himself. watch out. he will crush you into the dirt to get whatever he wants. that's who he is. >> i am so delighted to be here with my friend and a great leader, senator elizabeth warren. and no one works harder to make sure wall street never, never wrecks main street again. i got into this race because i wanted to even the odds for people who have the odds stacked against them, and this is not a time for half measures, to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top we have got to go big and we have got to go bold. let's set the goal of making
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sure wall street pay their fair share of taxes. >> so you noticed that? >> you alms catch me the things i say when we are not on tv. no. i got uncomfortable listening to the things elizabeth warren said about wall street which were captured with hillary standing right there. i thought it was almost a victory lap that she pulled clinton over to her side. >> you said you -- >> i got nervous because it wasn't her message until she got into hot water. >> it has become her message and what elizabeth warren is doing is helping focus. it has been hard for her. >> yeah. >> because of different, you know -- >> well, she hangs out with the
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gazillionair gazillionaires. >> and it wasn't even this, what she is doing here which is her attack mode, which you know she can do. she comes from the gut. it also comes because trump represents everything she has been fighting for. it is natural. she is good with her roots being from oklahoma. she is connecting on a personal, intimate, honest level. she is not afraid to really share her background. if you read her book i think she is extremely useful! s . >> she really is. she absolutely loves going after donald trump. it is what's really one of the things that publicly i think she
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has done best since she has gotten on the national stage. she is great at it. it is strange. >> why is she great at it? >> she is unafraid of him. >> it is everything she is. >> her ability to capture a lot of things that people are made uncomfortable by donald trufrmt trump. >> no body does. >> not only in in party but the other party. i find myself watching warren going after trump going why is she so good at it and everybody else is so bad at it. whether you agree with her or not i'm talking about prize fighter matching up against prize fighter. she goes in there and just jabs. she is really good at it. >> if the senator from massachusetts cannot be an unapologetic voice the
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democratic party should close up. kennedy played that role. her base is fairly -- her actual base is pretty small and devoted to her. it is an interesting midpoint. you know, it was very easy to identify his message, free college, single pay or whatever it is. clinton less so. she sort of warms her up without going all the way over. >> she reminds me -- twitter might break when i say this but bear with me for a second. what palin did, he didn't fill stadiums. clinton is steady. she does not fill arenas. warren provides that. >> you were talking about when
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sarah palin because she -- >> she pack aid reed arenas. >> and she attacked obama. >> so what is it about elizabeth warren and i'll add sarah palin, they step onto the stage -- early on i said scott walker is my guy. maybe i'm with him but i always worried, would walker be able to fill the big stage? what shocked a lot of us about sarah palin back in '08, she steps onto that stage but she is as big as anybody on the national stage when she gets behind that microphone.
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>> it is not surprising at all to to me. >> let's talk about this. >> let's talk. it's not surprising at all. >> i'm trying. i have known her a long time. if you look at sort of her trajectory she has been since she was at harvard obsessed with the concept of bankruptcy. >> from watching her parents. >> from watching her parents and sitting in harvard and watching families coming in and realizing they look like her and you and everybody else. but this was a problem. she knew it decades ago. she creates the consumer protection bureau. she gets run out by the republicans. you know what she does? she runs for senate. she is not someone who is going to run away. >> right. but i'm talking though not about
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our quality. i'm talking about filling the stage, performance. why is she led zeppelin? you get them on the stage and what is it about elizabeth warren, why does she fill the stage like led zeppelin? >> she is unafraid of the establishment. there is no doubt that being a woman and willing to stand up to the establishment which is mostly men, is electrifying. it just is. >> it is conviction versus calculation. >> yeah. >> like sanders. >> yeah. and she has these convictions. she doesn't have to worry about how it plays in a purple state. she can help with the people who do extraordinary number of people who weren't excited about it. >> well, donald trump -- >> by the way, you have seen this all along. i guess that's why this question
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is to elementary to you. you have been saying she was going to be her vice president all along. maybe this is just obvious to you. to me, though, seeing her on stage, owning a stage. >> uh-huh. they own it together. >> the way that politicians don't own the stage. very few do. she has something. >> and they have more chemistry than i expected. that was the revelation yesterday. people talked about how they personally dislike each other. >> hillary has this thing, she wants to win, you know? i think they connect. >> i will tell you too, one final thing, i love tim cane. i would want tim cane to be my vice president. i understand why brown would be popular for people in the party but the more i saw e hlizabeth
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warren a -- i thought how dull in the pick. i hope they are pulling her and i hope she is coming out well in the polls because if not she will make her v.p. pick look like a dud. >> so there was a lot of -- can you imagine all of the surrogates that came running yesterday considering the attacks again him? wow, boom, boom, boom, one after another. so there was a line up of big names -- >> okay. okay. okay. >> scott brown was there talking about dna tests. >> a guy who is -- what is she doing? >> ancestry.com i think. >> is he? >> ancestry.com makes sense because he wants -- >> spit into a vile and -- >> spit or blood? >> spit right in.
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>> somebody needs to be a surrogate with credibility, just saying. >> so he said quote i hope that -- >> no. can't be warren. >> i will speak very openly about her if she is. she is one of the least productive senators. we will call her pocahontas for a reason. she says she is native reason. she used that to advance her career. i think she is racist because what she did is very racist. nicole closing her eyes. i know they are really sad they were the ones that organized this. the republican national committee where he suggested dna testing may have to come into play. >> no. >> she is not native american. she is not 1/32.
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she has no native american background except for what her family told her. harvard and pen can release the records. she can take a dna test and release the records herself. there has been no effort. >> this is when you know you're losing a debate, when your opponent is talking about working class americans and fighting thoohard to bring working-class americans back into the mainstream and you're talking about whether someone is 1/32 native american and suggesting dna testing. this is so bizarre. this is -- this is june 27th's version of the trump university nonsense that happened
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yesterday. what tis wrong with them? >> they say they will turn the page and turn it towards the general election and have a more elegant -- but you know, you can't if your candidate is releasing ridiculous kindergarten-like statements. >> they are trying to turn the page on the muslim ban. they keep moving forward. >> no. >> they have to be disciplined up and down the line. this pocahontas nonsense, it doesn't work. it makes him look small in the general election. still ahead on "morning joe" new numbers out in the race for the white house. can you guess who is leading? plus trump's muslim ban continues to evolve.
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hallie jackson has new reporting on his addition to his communications team. fist, bill has a check ton forecast. >> remember you asked me if i wanted to go tubing and i said no. it looked like you were in downtown fort worth. it was someone else having a great time. there was some flash flooding going on there in the ft. worth area. she got up and enjoyed herself. a lot of rain exiting off of the coastli coastline. later on today about 7 million people of severe storm. small hail and minor power outages. burlington and saratoga to hudson valley and northern areas
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around trin ton and new york city. that is around 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. from rapid city outside of denver to areas in the western portion of kansas. how about out west? phoenix on track to tie the all time hottest june record. today will be 110 degrees, vegas 104. it had to be a record high. in 2013 they were actually 105 degrees. no signs of this. fresno up to 108. so the west is very hot. it will stay that way through the weekend and areas of the weekend will be dodging showers and thunderstorms. my timing around 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. this evening. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. or stop to find a bathroom? cialis for daily use is approved to treat both erectile dysfunction and the urinary symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently, day or night. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions
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we have new head to head poll numbers. >> this is exciting. we haven't had one in months. >> don't make fun of it. i think it is really interesting. >> it is fascinating. it is moving to fast. it is just kind of moving. >> i'm going to punch him. is that okay? the tracking poll shows hillary clinton leads by 48 points. her highest advantage since the general election. >> by the way, this one may be a little more accurate. i think that nbc poll -- i think the abc oversampled democrats. barack obama had an 87% approval rating. i'm serious. why would you go plus 12?
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>> yeah. >> when the generics weren't showing plus 12. i don't know why abc did it. that sounds about right. >> meanwhile it shows where the candidates are strongest. trump leads in washington where he has a 30 point advantage over clinton. he has a 16-point lead in being honest and stralgt forward. >> stop right there. let's stop right there. so if you're hillary clinton and you see your 25% being honest and donald trump is beating you by 16 points and he seems to be making things up as he go ace lo goes along what do you think?
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we have this theory. >> mine is the correct one. >> she spoke to me about why people don't trust her necessarily. these are -- i mean if you took their names off and you said the republicans are leading dramatically in those areas you would have to be worried if you were democrats. clinton is strong in things that matter too. a lot of people in the trump organization are confident. >> i want to get to this. honest, trump 41, honest clinton 25. explain. >> she says i have been attacked. no. don't play the victim. i like the second part of what she said but she has been focused on being attacked a little too much. >> and donald trump? >> donald trump is honest about
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the fact that he is dishonest. zb >> i don't even know what that means. >> i have one friend that comes over every friday about how he is feeling about trump. >> a great friend. >> he walks over and he'll say he is disgusting. i'll say who are you voting for? he is like donald. even when people are mad at him they are not going to not vote for him. they his fans. it's like music fans. it's like bieber fans. even when they are gross they are still their fans. >> i heard it all weekend by people who said i'm embarrassed by him. i can't believe how horrible he has been the last month. people that liked him the last month ago, i said so you're not voting for him? you expect me to vote for
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hillary? of course i'm voting for him. >> there was a moment about a month ago now where a republican in my native state very much an establishment figure said what about my man, trump. it was all about the fact that if she the is the nominee, i do wonder on the points, on the numbers there, i wonder if people at some level hear that as blunt. >> yes, for sure. >> yes. i think it's bluntness. >> i think the pocahontas stuff and all of the things that are a quick snap to jump to and respond to an attack personally by donald on twitter or blurt out something, i think there's a ti timeline on that. >> and hillary clinton said when the question goes to who can handle foreign policy best she
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has had 14 points on uniting the country, who would be a good commander in chief. >> they are tied on who will be effected on getting things done. clinton at 39%. >> it is pretty much down the middle. >> look at where he is winning. you'll see changing washington and -- >> yeah, the big ones. >> she is trying to fix it. she talked about changing things, standing up to wall street and dealing with the economy. that is the big one. she is trying to fix those things. >> coming up on "morning joe" democrats try to preempt the report on benghazi which is due out today. we'll talk to the man who lead that investigation, trey gowdy. "morning joe" is back in a
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welcome back. tell us what he said about his
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proposed ban. >> that's the question. that's the thing. it's not clear where he is on the ban or where it would apply to. you saw him begin to evolve on the position. when we talked yesterday that was one of the obviously topics that came up, what does this ban now mean? trump said what this ban applied to in particular terrorist states. people will be vetted very carefully and very tightly. for example, syria he said there would be a blanket ban on anyone coming in from syria. he wouldn't talk about if it meant muslims and nonmuslims so when you talk to people close to the campaign there is a sense trump is gbeginning to moderate
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his position. it isn't whether or not it is later on this week. it is something we'll be watching for. in the meantime the other is trade and that's what he is talking about today. so a senior adviser tells -- ad will talk about whether he will expect him to talk about those, labeling china as a currency manipulator. this is try to go capitalize on the vote overseas last week. in addition they are going after a clinton vulnerability here. this area of trade policy where they believe there is a lot of daylight between clinton and union voters and that is why he is here, going after the blue-collar worker. after this, by the way, he heads to his first campaign stop
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there. hillary clinton has been in ohio three times in the last three weeks. >> all right. hallie jackson, thanks very much. >> three large pieces of equipment behind her. s she will be getting in and doing donuts in them after this. it sounds like trump is moving from relyigion to region. if you're from syria or other war-torn areas. john, if this becomes the official policy he will also have to bat away what he did in the fall but as a policy moving forward it is less objectional.
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>> yes! this is ted cruz's position. >> yes. >> kind of. >> the central tenant was religio religious -- >> yeah. >> and so there's that. >> and you can't just unsay it. can you just unsay it? >> i don't think you can unsay it but to act as if there is no significance to somebody moving to the more mainstream position. if it is very hard to verify whether there will be terrorists or not you're suddenly taking the same position as the fbi or other law enforcement agencies. that is mainstream law enforcement position. you're in david duke territory when you say they can't come to the united states. >> did he mean it there or will
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he mean it now? after investigating more than two years house republicans released reports that lead into the benghazi terror attacks. andrew mitchell has the details. >> the section of the 800 page republican report sheds new light on the breakdown on the military response of the benghazi attacks and the failure to have a plan. the report says 35 americans were saved not by local malitias the u.s. thought were allies but by former military officers by gadhafi's regime who the u.s. helped topple one year before. why was chris stevens in such a dangerous place? hillary clinton said last fall -- >> he understood america had to
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be represented there at that pivotal time. >> the report says stevens was filling a temporary staffing gap most surprising witnesses told the committee stevens was laying the ground work by secretary clinton the following month. a major focus is the failure to carry out orders to deploy forces to benghazi. the force didn't get to tripoli until the afternoon because of a reported failure to have airplanes ready. there was question over whether marines should wear military n uniform or civil attire. one said during the course of three hours waiting on the plane he and his marines changed in and out of their uniforms four
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times. democrats have a different view, even before seeing the republican report. they say the u.s. military could not have done anything differently that would have saved the lives of the four brave americans. they blast the report as a case study as how not to conduct an investigation wasting more than $7 million of taxpayer money. >> and the chairman here trey gowdy of south carolina. >> thank you for being with us. >> yes, sir. >> we were talking not just about your report but also things we have read over time and it sounds like bungling in desert i with the failed arra--n
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ian uniforms. changing uniforms three or four times while people are calling for help? >> it is a really stark reality. at 5:15 a.m. not a single wheel of a single u.s. military asset was heading towards libya. this is seven hours after the initial attack and the powerful military can't get a single wheel turning towards the region. that is in addition to our committee learning nothing was ever going to benghazi, nothing. the mortar attacks could have taken place at 7:15 a.m. or 9:15 a.m. or lunchtime ton the 12th. nothing was heading towards benghazi despite what he ordered. >> so democrats saying you
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conducted this desperately trying to land a front-page conviction seeking to improve the security of our dem dealersh diplomatic core. >> i will tell you he hasn't read the report. you read the report. if you think it's on over zealous frprosecutor our reports twice as long. i would ask you and all of my fellow citizens, put aside what they say the report will be like. it is out. read it for yourself and read all of the new information we found and what our focus is on. it is not on one person. it is on four people. >> nicole, you say from everything you read it is
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shocking that more americans didn't die. >> yeah. congressman, i know your focus has been ton live on the lives lost. i wonder how it over shadows -- there should have been bipartisan zealousness. all of your work has been clouded by political overlays. i know it is one of your frustrations but i wonder if there is anything you can do about how four brave americans died, what would that be? >> we have done it and it is out this morning. it is the story of the heroism of those who died and also those who were injured and those who survived. you're right. for those going to the mission compound more lives would have been lost but for the team in tripoli, getting their own
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private aircraft but for the evacuation by a group other than the one we were lead to believe evacuated us you are exactly right. more americans would have died. >> why do you think the conversation has been so politicalized? if you read from those whose sons and husbands have died i think their diversion should quiet some of that. why has it been so political? is there anything that the committee under your direction did to get off on the wrong foot? >> well, we got off on the right foot. >> maybe that was the problem. >> it was a problem on the right but not ton the left. i think mr. couplings and the others just assumed the republicans were going to do what they thought we were going to do which was a political
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exercise. they will be shocked when they read the report if they bother to read the report. it is a series of heroic acts and what we can do to prevent the next. yes, hillary clinton was secretary of state at the time. i can't get around that fact. in focus is on exactly what the families ask us to focus on. shame on the democrats for figuring that out. >> if focus was not on hillary clinton. what did he discover about the role he played? >> the biggest take away for me is this two-hour white house meeting from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. this is after he issued his order. there is a two-hour meeting which is secretary participated in. read the read-outs of what came
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out of that meeting. that is when the decision was made to go to tripoli, not benghazi. read that too. read the summaries. >> so you're saying while our men were being shot at and killed and our first ambassador killed since 1979 while on duty, they were talking about the libyan's feelings? >> don't take my word for it. it's all in the documents. >> that's what i'm saying, while our men were dying our ambassador were being dragged through the street they were saying they didn't want to do anything because it might hurt their feelings -- >> i'm not saying that. of the ten action items half of them dealt with the video.
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half of them including directing secretary to call you tube. this is a guy that should have been ordered and he is being asked to call you tube. >> what is the lesson the congressman should take? >> that congress does a lousy job of a political nonpartisan investigations and the people deserve better. >> thank you so much. >> we appreciate it. and a two-day sell off following the brexit vote. we are back in a moment. esses... did all her exes get invited? no ones got moves like uncle joe. ♪ when it's go book on choicehotels.com for instant rewards like gift cards, plus savings of up to 20%.
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48 past the hour. >> two days and $3 trillion worth of market lost around the world.
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we are seeing a lit little bit of green today. not everyone is sounding the trumpets about this 100 points or so just yet. we have a long way to go. where we have seen the damage is in the bank stocks all over the world. they have lost over a third of their value in the two days around the brexit votes. near historic lows right now. american banks have taken a hit. there is a lot of uncertainty still over how the actual leading process will hold. it will weigh on markets for quite some time here as they talk about the article 50. you'll hear it talked about a lot. it addresses how countries leave the european union. we'll check out what's happening with involvvolkswagen as well.
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we'll see what happens there as well. that announcement later this morning. back over to you. >> thank you very much. up next, the decision that will make the republican a lot more welcoming when the convention starts there next month. we'll explain what that is next.
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so the republican national convention starts in less than
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three weeks. >> wow. >> three weeks? >> yes. >> wow. >> mark has been following this. >> okay. sherman williams announced the lebron james banner will stay up. they planned to take it down beginning with the convention. once the cavs brought home the championship 23,000 people changed a petition asking the company to leave it up. >> mark, why does this matter? >> because part of this convention will be about celebrating cleveland. >> does anybody have a -- >> he left. >> we had a conversation about the republicans -- >> i point you, and he does to, to the story of the prodigal's
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son. >> she doesn't read the new testament. what are you doing? getting faster. huh? detecting threats faster, responding faster, recovering faster. when your security's built in not just bolted on, and you protect the data and not just the perimeter, you get faster. wow, speed kills. systems open to all, but closed to intruders. trusted by 8 of 10 of the world's largest banks.
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welcome back. it is time to talk about what we learned today. >> i respect your opinions. >> thank you so much. you make great television. what have you learned? >> battle of sullivan's island.
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>> 1776. >> happy carolina day. >> i feel like i landed on nerd island. i don't know what you're talking about. >> you just figured that out now? this is like season 8 of lost. >> it is like nerd debates. zbli lea >> i learned you can break twitter if you compare. dozens of votes sailed in a 635 mile to bermuda. among the sailers was among someone i want to thank, that is dr. doug evans. he saved the life of one of my best friends, tia. his crew, who calls themselves team time out is dedicated to raising awareness for pancreatic
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cancer. thank you so much. >> thank you. thank you. >> we love tia. >> did you learn anything? >> i learned you don't follow anything. stick around, stephanie picks up the coverage right now. good morning. i'm stephanie. benghazi bomb shell just out moments ago. we have new information on what really happened that night. the focus of this vort wh whwha report is what the families asked us to focus on. >> the breaking new details shaking up an already nasty campaign. >> you want to see goofy? look at him in that hat. his surrogate demanding she take a dna test but t

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