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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 12, 2013 6:00am-9:00am EST

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causes of death so why take them. jeff says what else will give me glow-in-the-dark. and max says of course they are a great excuse to have gummies. >> we had some votes for flint stones. steve, i have grandparents who are 77 and 90 and never took vitamins. should i start now? you want to see our news block i'll push it out on facebook and twitter right after the show. "morning joe" starts right now. chris christie appeared on all four sunday shows to talk about how much he didn't want to talk about the presidential race. >> governor, how interested are you in running for president in 2016? >> well, chris, what i'm interested in doing is be the governor of new jersey. what i'm focused on is doing my
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job in new jersey. time governor of new jersey. for me i'm the governor of new jersey and my job is to run the state of new jersey. >> yes he's just the governor of new jersey. that's why he went on meet the jerry, fox news jersey sun, face the turnpike and this new jersey new jersey new jerseyopolis. >> good morning, everyone, it's tuesday, november 12th. whoa, that would be pub day. he and mecham right there start things off at columbia last night. how did that go? >> they are still clapping. >> they are still clapping. >> think about morningside heights. it's open to republican ideas. >> that looks great. >> actually i was surprised. i was surprised at the number of republicans -- >> were there any. >> that were bussed in. >> did they bus them in. how many people raised their
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hand? >> from nuttily. >> very good student questions. and -- >> this looks fantastic. >> they weren't college republicans. i'll tell you, though, their questions were the questions that you hear from younger, younger people am the time who just aren't ideological. they are skeptical of ideologues. it was a great event and we want to thank miles nidal bath he got a book and handed it out tomb. >> we'll talk about miles all week. and jeffrey saks. he was there. >> he went off to a u.n. dinner. >> he said he was a parody of himself. >> there had to be a powerpoint at that dinner. >> we also have former
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democratic congressman harold ford jr. and in washington editorial director of the national journal ron fournay. >> why here and here there's nothing nuclear weapon got to talk with god. >> can i color that in for you? >> stop. >> i was at the alabama/lsu game. i got to tell you people down there love you. >> stop. >> i'm serious they love joe scarborough. 200 times on my way from the president's party -- >> the president box. >> you're saying you were with the peep. >> from the tailgate walking over people are nuts about you. they obviously don't know you very well. >> we'll try to cooperate that way. >> talk to anybody between the
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suv and the suv -- >> you remember we did that walk john there were a few people. >> wow. >> it was a great game. it's alabama -- it's a really special place. that campus and the people there. tons of people go there. you just feel like every time guy there you feel like you're home. >> i feel like the guy running the health care website for the president. >> oh, my lord. >> the leader. watching him on the field run that pre-game stuff with these kids and how he interacts with the kids and coaches. there's a precision an an execution there that's really unmatched. >> leadership, identify always said whether you're talking about running a country or a football team or running a baptist church, you know this. it starts at the top. and it's got to be strong. >> all right. >> entire organizes are turned on a dime. >> i was trying to help your book. >> by a strong leader.
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>> okay. so we have a lot to talk about this morning. >> like your father. what do you have against strong leaders? >> nothing. >> okay. great. what's going on >> we'll talk more about your book. we'll also be -- this front page picture on the "new york times" says it all. we'll be talking about how you can help in the philippines. it is unspeakable the devastation there. cataclysmic. at this point it's about trying to figure how to get to people, survivors who have nowhere to go. >> it's terrible story. of course, we'll begin with what is on the front of the "wall street journal." numbers were finally released on the enrollment. >> finally getting a look at how many americans have been enrolled in obama care and for the white house the numbers are terrible. the "wall street journal" reports that so far around 50,000 people have signed up for private coverage or medicaid through the government website and in oregon one of the states running their own exchanges not
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a single person has enrolled. obama administration officials were hoping to sign up at least 500,000 people in the move october. and additional reports say the white house is hoping to boost coverage by looking at individuals who signed up but have not sent in their first payment. tissues with healthercare.gov have prevented tens of thousands love income americans from successfully signing up for medicaid. there are some states that are not allowing that. later today the websites chief digital architect will tell congressional leaders he had no idea initial tests of the website had security flaws that could lead to identity theft. >> ron, you've been covering this up close. it's staggering whether you talk about possibility of identity theft. it doesn't matter what part of it is, it's been botched. there will be books written on
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this at some point. obviously the blame starts at the top with the president and kathleen sebelius. this looks like a systemic breakdown. looks like you just can't point at the people at the very top. there's a lot of people up and down the food chain that failed miserably on this. >> it is systemic. it goes to the heart of the democratic party argument an argument that the government can do a lot of good things really well. if we can't get this right it under mines that entire argument. >> an argument you've said very publicly, in this case you support it. >> do i. >> you want this for personal reasons, not for professional reasons, you want this to work for personal reasons and there are millions of people like that, which makes this all the more, all the more just unbelievable to people who believe that the government can do big things and do it well. >> it's not just a personal thing.
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i have two older daughters who have been able to take advantage of obama care. but i think any american, whether you're a small government conservative or big government liberal or like most of america you just want government to work, that's the point. we just want government to work. when our president and leaders say or governor says this is going to happen we have to have some confidence it will work and if it doesn't work they will be honest with us about their failures. neither of those happened in this case. >> willie, i can't believe somebody in the white house isn't saying let's delay this for six months, let's start all over. zero people in oregon, a fairly progressive state have not enrolled. >> that's a major concession and a major loss for the white house to admit that it didn't work. >> and can't be fixed. >> but, ron, you've written about this a lot. the white house and many progressives who defend the white house say come on guys it's about a website. we're talking about something so much bigger which is reforming
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the american health care system. the website glitches which are much more than glitches at this point will be a bump in the road along the road in history. do you buy that? do you believe we can get big reformation on the system? >> i can't predict the future but i do apply the fact the game is not over yet. this is more of a personal decision than political decision. if americans in another six weeks, six days, six months are able to go on to -- this is more than a website, it's the front door to this, you know, huge social change, if they are able to go there and make reasonable choice and they find they have better health care and/or at a lower cost, this will be a bump in the road and the president will go down in hicstory as somebody who has accomplished something big. if it doesn't work he'll go down in hicht as something other than a great president. >> there's time. there's definitely time to put this in the rear view mirror.
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it's ug try to watch this. the white house is pushing back by laying partial blame on local and state officials. on the white house blog, the administration points out that as many as 5.4 million americans could gain access to medicaid under obama care but are being denied by elected state officials who refuse to expand the program. researchers at the urban institute also estimate as many as 144,000 veterans below the poverty line are among those being denied. >> i had two people raise their arms -- >> the republicans are doing the same thing. you can watch every glitch. the website didn't work. we got it. >> local officials, though, did a horrible job during katrina. but at the end of the day george w. bush still appropriately bore the responsibility for the failure. >> sure. i don't think anyone is not taking responsibility. >> the white house is not taking
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responsibility. >> they are pointing out everyone is making you want difficult not just their own botched roll out which they take responsibility for but every step of the way. every step of the way the republicans have tried to undermine this from top to bottom and if anything they probably were part of the problem. >> that's absolutely true which makes it even more important to make the damn thing work. >> that's right. oh, good lord do i want that to happen. >> arguing well, all right, know the federal isn't work but by god because republicans and state aren't letting medicaid happen things are -- >> think about that. >> i always had an attitude when i went into a campaign. my family would be shocked when people run negative ads and lie about me. i said that's not being shocked, guys. like that's a box you walk through a boxing ring and shocked that somebody is trying to take your head off. it's what happens. so the white house can sit back and be shocked at republicans or
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trying to knock their head off, but it's what democrats did to bush. it's what we did to clinton. it's the nature of the game. you got be smart enough, if you know they are coming to knock your head off you got to be ready and be even smarter. >> i've not heard it said that republicans are the reason that the website is facing the challenges they are facing. if they are that argument should come forward and explain it. and ron said his young daughter signed up for obama care. the program is only to sustain itself if young healthy people pay into the system otherwise the whole premise of the idea false terrifies. we should find more governors to allow them to sign up under medicaid. you create financial stress and put greater stress on the system. you need younger information sign. the focus is stop it right now. under what's gone wrong. whether it takes four months, six months they should do that.
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limping along serves no real purpose. i was talking to a ceo of a coin detroit yesterday, decent size company, emblois 400 people i don't understand how this is to work. we don't understand long term what the costs will be. he's a democrat and wants to be supportive. for three reasons -- >> totally agree. ron, i just think that the medicaid story is just another sign of how difficult this process has been. this is a party that had a group of people that held the government hostage to try and get rid of a law that was passed by the government and approved by the supreme court in every way, shape and form. it's just another example of them getting in the way of anything happening for this presidency. >> there's no doubt the republican party has set itself up to really be hurt badly by the democratic party and to put it, i think that if they are not
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careful they are heading on a path to extinction. they are doing some terrible things. you know what? you don't play the same game they are. >> they are not. >> the best way to counter what the republicans are doing would be to come out with a website that works. come out with a program that works the way you promised. be honest with the american people from the beginning. not inflating the numbers they are putting out now and spinning numbers. would be to lead. you're right. the republican party, it's not -- there's no saints here. no saints anywhere in washington. that's problem. where are the adults in the room? >> decisive action is what's needed here. by the way, decisive action is taking down the website. delaying it six months and saying this -- but you know what? we're not interested in the first six months we're interested in the first 60 years. we'll take this back not to use an overused military analogy but
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i'm going to use an overused military analogy because it's one of the greatest analogies yet. i talk about you don't run up the middle on fourth and 31. george washington showed us one of the most important battles in the revolutionary war was the refreigr retreat from long island to manhattan. george washington knew he had to take decisive action. sometimes a retreat is a decisive action can help you win the battle. the white house needs to do that quickly. it's dribbling along. it's terrible for this process. >> one question is, which is always a question for presidents is who has either the credibility or the guts to walk in and say that to the president? >> nobody. >> within the white house. >> that's the problem.
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>> could the vice president do it? could the chief of staff? secretary of health and human services? and it's very hard. george w. bush used to say people would be out in the waiting room in the oval office go in and tell him what all. >> isn't there a concern if you wait six months that party that's been trying under mine this every step of the way, they say they have a deadline and it will work. it just has -- >> two weeks. >> two weeks from now. >> the problem is you're right the republicans have done everything they can to undermine this but so have the democrats not intentionally. what they have done has under mind this. the problem is government has no credibility the president is losing his credibility and how will we get those young millennials to sign up and get insurance they don't think they need if they don't believe it will work. >> at some point if you watch
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this every day, if you're considering enrolling and you can't enroll the entire program loses credibility. you lose people who thought they might be invested over time. you can shut it down for six months but i agree with mika that's what republicans and some democrats have been asking. >> that would be the victory. >> we told you. >> it's clear we're not ready for primetime. i'm for the program. i want it to work. there may be people "around the table" who want to see this to work. but if it doesn't work there's no need to kid ourselves. let's fix it. the challenge with millennials signing up, many are discouraged i can't sign up fein i go to the site. i was reluctant, skeptical why go forward. i'm willing to take that calculated risk because it's not working now. the president's credibility is online. it makes people question whether he can deliver. >> a new nbc news poll gives insight what a head-to-head match-up of chris christie and
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hillary clinton would look like in 2016. among adults the former secretary of state would lead new jersey's governor by ten points, 44 to 34. the split is far more stark among african-americans where clinton leads 83-4. christie, however, leads among whites, seniors and high income earners. >> that's new demographic. >> broken down by region. here's a regional breakdown. >> oh, my. >> clinton enjoys double digit leads in the east and northwest and narrow leads in the south and midwest with a wide field of projected candidates christie enjoys less certainty within his own party nearly as many republicans support him as prefer another candidate in the primaries. who? who? i'm just saying. hillary clinton by comparison
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has 66% support of left leaning adults. today the pro hillary clinton super p.a.c. ready for hilary holds its first national finance meeting. a "new york times" -- the "new york times" calls it a turning point for the young organization. 200 donors and top political from jafs will be on hand looking to boost grassroot efforts and build a digital presence. areas where the 2008 campaign fell short already the group is fundraising on videos like these. ♪ >> the history of progress in america. think of the suffrogates in 1848. those who kept fighting until women could cast their votes. think of the abolitionists who struggled and died to see the end of slavery. if we can blast 50 women into space we will some day launch a woman into the white house. although we weren't able to shatter that highest hardest
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glass ceiling this time thanks to you it's got about 18 million cracks in it. >> all right. john mecham in >> i hope the clintons turn out to be in the big leagues of politics. they haven't been in this rodeo before so it's a real question of whether or not that fundraising will work well. >> they call this ready for hilary meeting, grassroots thing. this is a serious group of people. >> isn't it clear? >> what politician would like -- >> that's what i was saying. these are big names that run -- one highly involved with president obama's campaign. this is in motion. >> i xerox these things off boup like. yeah. phone banks. yeah. a million dollars. yeah. meet with the churches. give us a million dollars. yes.
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that's grassroots. east harlem school dinner last night where -- >> she's every where. >> man about town. >> introduced patrick. she sounded, the secretary sounded great. she was strong. you could see her beginning -- i heard sometimes she's now coming in to a form here. so she's going to be tough. coming up on "morning joe" chuck todd has more on today's brand new polling. we'll talk to jennifer granholm. ken burns will be here and hines ward. and we'll be updating throughout morning how you can help in the philippines. we'll put up graphics throughout the show to help the people stranded there, tens of thousands of people. let's get a check on the weather with karen cairns. >> today is one of the days that's good to get to work early especially in the northeast and mid-atlantic. for those of you on i-95 your
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warmest temperatures have already happened. the temperature in new york city dropped ten degrees in the last hour. we got a good chance of seeing snow here shortly. significant on interstate look at this huge snow pile coming off lake michigan northern indiana, southern michigan. temperatures are very frigid throughout the midwest and the wind chills are making it worse. wind chill in kansas city is 7, buffalo 19. this is what's heading to the east coast, temperatures will plunge quickly. we're also seeing snow all in the white. careful driving in west virginia. there's an area of snow up here. areas of northwestern new jersey and hudson valley. this arctic front is blowing through right now on i-95. temperatures will tumble during the day and look how cold it will be from minneapolis to kansas city to chicago. i mean that's like mid-winter type cold. so bundle up. this is new buffalo, michigan where the snow is flying off the great lakes.
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if found guilty they face up 20 years in prison. >> the "new york times" college applicants better think twice, they found 30% of college admission officers look at an applicant's social media profile. what they found hurts their chances of getting into colleges. most colleges don't have formal policies of searching prospective students online they do it and they should. >> oh, my gosh. the vancouver sun, the founder of lululemon apologized that their pants don't work for some women's bodies. the pants became see through because of rubbing of women's thighs. this gets worse and worse on the company's youtube channel. >> i'm chip wilson.
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i'm founder of lululemon. i would like to talk about the bloomberg interview. i'm really sad. i'm a sad for the repercussions of my actions. i'm sad for the people at lululemon who i care so much about that really had to face the brunt of my actions. i take responsibility for all that has occurred. and the impact it has had on you. >> you know, i think, first of all, that was a terrible video but secondly i'm thinking just looking at him from here up his thighs probably rub together too. >> i'm thinking they touch. >> jen dourks see that? his thighs -- he's got a thigh problem too. >> he's fighting his own demons. "usa today" research is showing the number of drivers who surf the web while behind the wheel is on the rise. the number has nearly doubled from 13% in 2009 to 24% this
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year. drivers who are 18 to 29, of course, are are the worst at it and that number has jumped to almost 50%. >> this is from cnbc's home page. we heard about flipping homes for cash now billionaires are taking the practice a step further spending millions to flip their mega jets. thanks to high demand for the rare gulf stream g 60 jet some owners are turning prochts as much as $7 million for a sale. since it launched last year only 35 hit the market. buyers have been willing to pay out as much as $70 million for the jet. who? what? >> we should ask harold. >> the last time i was on one we were all together. >> oh, that's just cold. why to you hate. >> were we? >> when loving would be so much
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easier. >> up interpreted that wrong. i love you. i want to go back with you. so please invite me again. >> this is awkward. i don't know what he's talking about. are you talking about our blue one or white one? >> there's a blue one? >> yeah. >> all right you two. why don't we go politico. willie. >> he's joshing. >> where is the politico desk with willie geist. >> with us now chief white house correspondent for politico mike allen. >> good morning. >> another senate republican is criticizing chris christie, oklahoma jim inhofe said i have a hard time supporting chris christie. i'm of the school that you've got to show a distinction
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between democrats and republicans. and in toward have the base energized. you've got to show that the party stand for something. before we go any further we should send our condolences to senator inhofe. some tragic news about his son yesterday as well. >> yes. sunday dr. perry inhofe who is 52 died in a plane crash back home. this interview was right before that tragedy. we're seeing the challenge for chris christie, that there is among a lot of conservatives, old time conservatives, senator inhofe will be 79 this month. but also, willie, and this is the most important part among big republican donors, there's residual unhappiness about the way that chris christie embraced president obama right at the end of the romney campaign. but so much water has gone under the dam since then.
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it's hard to imagine that issue lasting. chris christie has to make up some ground with these republicans but that's a conversation i can see occurring. it was such a disaster that either party gets a pass for working with their president on that issue. >> this is the tension set up by a lot of people. chris christie may be appealing to the middle but how does he get through the primary process. an old question asked of a lot of candidate. >> right now he's seen as a darling of people who are on television and establishment insofar as there is a republican establishment. he's seen as a flig. mike, i'm wondering where is the energy now for presidential candidates on the right? is it santorum? is it already to cruz? where do you think the real center of gravity is for challenge sners >> well, the energy and action has been with senator cruz. there's been so much energy
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excitement about him and this rage we hear in the country from across spectrum and we've been talking the last couple of days here on "morning joe" about the possibility of an elizabeth warren candidacy for presidency whether the massachusetts senator might challenge hillary clinton. and that's a different kind of unhappiness, the populace rage. you got the income in equality. senator cruz speaks to that. chris christie sfeex that in his candor and bluntness. people will tell you that the youtubes of chris christie speaking his mind will hurt him. i think that's exactly where a lot of the country is right now and it certainly is where the republican base is which will make up some of the steps that you are rightly pointing out to, he starts way behind with that group. he has to prove himself. his move is their move. >> politico's mike allen. mike, always good see you.
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monday night football featuring a couple of teams desperate for a win. dolphins in the news all week. at the bucs. fourth quarter after blowing a lead bucs down four points cap an 80-yard drive with a ride. miami with one last shot fourth and long brian tan him tosses up the deep ball. tampa hangs on first win of the season for the bucs. 22-19. big news out of the city of atlanta. mayor there says he's not interested in shelling out half a billion dollars in taxpayer money to keep the atlanta braves in town so yesterday the team announced it will move out of the heart of the city where hank aaron broke babe ruth's home run record and where they have been for 50 years. turner field was built for the 1996 games. that was less than 20 years ago. now the team citing lack of
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economic development around the stadium area. interstate access. and poor mass transportation. it will move to the equally traffic clocked suburbs. the team has caused outrage and being ridiculed with spoof logos like this one. despite the team's onfield success the attendance has stag natd. they are looking to sling its capacity and develop a 60 acre plot with a mixed-use facility. >> i was surprised because my experience at turner field is family friendly. there's a lot of stuff to do. >> it's not the park so much although the capacity became too large. they will shrink it by 10,000 seats. there's no parking. traffic constantly. it was driving people away from the games. they also, obviously, couldn't get the taxpayer money they felt they needed and the mayor of atlanta said i'm not going put taxpayer money on the line. >> which you can understand
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that. we both lived in atlanta. i was born there, grew up going to braves games. it was one thing going to braves games 20, 30 years ago going downtown. now the growth is all north. season ticket holders are north. and you're exactly right. you go down there. you got the stadium and there's just nothing around it. here you're going to have the stadium and going to develop around it and it's going to be, you know, it's where the fans are. where the majority of ticket holders are. the city has grown straight north. >> i lived there right around the time the stadium opened. it feels like -- i guess i'm getting old. feels like it just opened. '97. feels like a newer stadium. >> one of the long standing ironies, the appetite we have for these stadiums and build them and ask taxpayers to do that. i know mayor reed. but i'm glad that a politician
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standing up to the idea. >> we can't do it right now especially in atlanta. they have some economic challenges. the economy, tax revenue is down. i don't know who would want their city to spend half a billion dollars on a new stadium. >> don't forget, they are building a new falcons stadium, $1.2 billion stadium that also opened around the time of the olympics. mayor reed said enough is enough. >> a lot of others would support that. >> finally. >> mika is big in cobb county. the lives. i was born there. atlanta rhythm section. i worked in marietta.
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>> he's showing off. >> did you see this video, scary moment for harlem globetrotters. william bulord -- >> oh, my lord. >> finishes it off. >> yikes! . i hate when that happens. the backboard is that's. cut him near his left eye. he's okay. he's back up. >> holy cow. >> i hate when that happens. >> when you dunk it, you don't hold on quite as long. you dunk it and you let go. >> one game. >> i think shaq did that a couple of times realm games. right down. >> can't they attach it better? >> he's the shaq. >> yeah. >> right. >> coming up next dr. jeffrey
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generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ ♪ all right. time now for the -- wow. it's snowing. that is new york city. time now for the must read opinion pages. maybe we'll get to one. but first we want to talk about the philippines. here with us now the director of the earth institute at columbia university economist dr. jeffrey sachs and get the ian williams package prepared. we might get to that as well.
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but, first of all, how do we even put this event in perspective? is there anything? >> well, it's unbelievable. and they are saying that they can't be sure but looks like the most powerful typhoon ever to make landfall and so it's unbelievable the power that this storm had, and, of course, the devastation is shocking and we're learning more. >> it's indescribable. beyond the fact that we can't even imagine how many people have perished. it can be up to 10,000. right now we're talking about pockets of areas where there are people who will not get help, who will die now because there's no way to get to them. and there's no way to get to everybody. i mean it is -- how about this compared to the tsunami? >> well, the tsunami came from an earthquake which is a very different kind of phenomenon in terms of the devastation, of course, both were shocking and the tsunami in japan was followed by the nuclear
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disaster. but what's happening here and this is the part that people have a hard time coming to grips with, we're partly causing this. we're causing this because there are more and more of these storms because of the way that humanity is changing the world's environment. i brought along from 2008 a scientific study showing that the number of extreme storms or not the frequency but the power of them has been rising decade by decade as the ocean water is warming. and so this kind of event, we're seeing more of it. >> are your saying this is, this kind of event is preventable >> this kind of event will happen more frequently unless we change the way we run our energy system. this is what humanity is doing. this is very, very hard to come to grips with. >> and your view, this risk we read about, manhattan possibly being -- >> we had it a year ago of course with sandy because when
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that superstorm hit, the sea level was already one foot higher than it was a century ago because the same warming effect is raising the sea level. and so we had a storm surge that was completely unprecedented for us. and what's interesting as soon as this storm hit all the climate deniers were out in forks all the twitter, all over social immediate area don't blame it, don't do this, don't exploit it, but the fact of the matter is these crises are coming one after another and this should force us to take note of what we're doing. human cause climate change. >> ron, jump in. how do you legislate in light of an event like this. dr. sachs' point of view there's a deniers and washington in the middle of it all. >> you don't legislate until you know what's happening. the science is clear. evangelicals in the republican party recognized this is a problem something they need to
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lead on because they believe in us protecting the earth that the lord gave us. party and evangelical wing of it is running away from what is clear science. it will put the republican party on the wrong side of history. you can't deny that humidity is affecting the globe in ways that are harmful. >> yeah. howard ford jr.? >> i'm going to switch for one moment if i can as a push to raise the minimum wage and democrats and congress urging to get this done. what's the strongest argument against those who say raising the minimum wage will hurt business activity and the economy? >> think the evidence is that you raise the minimum wage, you may get a very small effect on the numbers employed but you get a big benefit for the people who need it and so with our income distribution so unequal right now, it's shameful that we're letting people work full time and not being able to get out of
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poverty at all and so the minimum wage needs go up and would be a boost for the economy. definitely a boost for those people. >> already, dr. jeffrey sachs thank you very much. on tomorrow's show we'll talk to former treasury secretary larry summers. we can ask him about that. best selling author will be here with his new book, malcolm gladwell. we'll give you some places where you can go to help the philippines. americare. please do whatever you can. "morning joe" is back in a moment. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping
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♪ as we saw on "american idol," steven tyler gets very excited around beautiful women. this is his question for miss venezuela. >> judge number one steven tyler, can we have your question, please. >> miss venezuela -- [ speaking spanish ] >> what is your biggest fear and how do you plan to overcome it? [ speaking spanish ]
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>> my biggest fear is that a scary beauty pageant judge will invite me and i will walk among the living dead. >> thank you very much. >> wow. ron, thank you very much. yeah. you missed it when you were watching. >> i was reading something. i missed it. >> miss australia was here yesterday. >> she's so cool. beautiful. smart. coming up at the top of the hour, the president of the aspen institute, walter isaacson and chuck todd with polling on the 2016 horse race and joe wilton "today" show for his new book. we'll be simulcasting that interview. you have to stay in control now. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] this is jim,
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♪ live look at the white house. it's the top of the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." it's snowing here in new york. john mecham and harold ford jr. still with us. in washington we have chief white house correspondent and political director and host of the daily rundown chuck todd and here on set president of ceo aspen institute walter isaacson. we'll be hearing about joe's new
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book "the right bath." in a few minutes we'll simulcast with the "today" show. when that happens that means you all, you know, wrap it up. i might wrap you ruddily. >> no? >> i would never do that. i wouldn't interrupt. but i will. we'll get to that in just a moment. the book is getting a lot of great play. you guys were at columbia last night. barnes and noble tonight. also we'll have an update on the philippines and how you can help. but first since we have chuck here, brand new nbc news polls gives insight in what a head-to-head match-up of chris christie and hillary clinton would look like in 2016. among adults the former secretary of state would lead new jersey's governor by 10 points, 44-34. the split is far more stark among african-americans where clinton leads 84-4. christie leads among whites, seniors and high income earners. broken down by region clinton
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enjoys double digit leads in the east and northwest. a wide field of projected candidates christie enjoys less certainty within his own party. nearly as many republicans support him as they would prefer another kind. clinton has 66% of left leaning adults. today the pro hill lie super p.a.c. hosts its first national finance meeting. the "new york times" calls it a turning point for the young organization. 200 donors and top political from jafs will be on hand looking to boost grassroot efforts. areas for the 2008 campaign fell short. already the group is fundraising on videos like these. >> the history of progress in america. think of the suffrogates who gathered in seneca falls in 1848 and those who kept fighting until women could cast their
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reits. think of the abolitionists who struggled and died to see the end of slavery. if we can blast 50 women to space we'll some day launch a woman into the white house. although we weren't able to shatter that highest hardest glass ceiling this time thanks to you it's got about 18 million cracks in it. >> in political circles chuck todd why is this important because everyone is talking about chris christie, of course, as a possible candidate in 2016 and how he does against hillary clinton the possible candidate in 2016, it shows some differences to his success in new jersey. >> well, look, i think a lot of people will say we didn't need a poll to tell us this. i thought the numbers were a reality check. number one, democrats enjoy an automatic advantage in the presidential election and you see that. when you see the breakdown between the, two think about it. this is chris christie's best week of his political career
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nationally. unbelievable press coverage that he's gotten. hillary clinton, obviously, also formidable. and it already breaks down in the usual democrat/republican lines where christie is only performing well among groups that memorabilia performed well. what i thought were interesting was the primary numbers. what that tells is, whether one of them is going to have problems or not. hillary clinton, she didn't receive less than 60% in any major demographic group. there are not nearly the warning signs about a potential primary challenger that you saw say eight years ago at this time back in 2005-2006. even among barack obama's white coalition, you know he had an african-american coalition, but among his white democratic coalition that's where she is the weakest, college graduates, men and some of the out west a little bit and yet even there hillary clinton is getting 60%.
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with chris christie, though, all of the warning signs that we all think are there when it comes to him with conservatives and with the republican electorate all show up in these numbers does not do well in the south, does not do well with men, does not do well with the more conservative elements of the republican party. >> walter asoakson the warning signs are because the republican party has a fairly difficult process to get a candidate past the primary? >> yes. the question i would ask chuck if republicans nominate somebody like a ted cruz or rand paul is that going to make it more easy for them to beat hilary? i guess you could argue it either way. >> chuck, real quick? >> look, it's obvious. i think christie is not nearly as strong in these general election matchups as some in the establishment wish he were. he can't automatically say look at me i'm more electable. that's not showing up in these polls. it's hard to imagine, ran paul will argue he can do better among young people than hillary
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clinton and he can do better among certain independent groups and even run to the left of her in foreign policy. right now when you see that the public has a generic d and a generic r mindset already, you know, i don't see it. >> harold ford. put yourself in the shoes of somebody trying to advise christie. you look back at these last two republican nominee, they ran to the right. do you advise christie to stay himself, take the risk of perhaps losing a primary but running on his own or shifting to the right to win enough votes? >> you know, rudy giuliani tried to do it on his own so it didn't work. that path didn't work either. we know the romney and mccain path. he has to figure out how to talk to -- i think he has to show up to these tea party events and maybe disagree with them a little bit. but show up. the same advice he's giving other republicans about showing up to hispanic communities and
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showing up to african-american communities, that's right generally. he has to do what the this republican conservatives. >> if he makes shiftses to the right the problem is sticking to the message that is chris christie which is no one pushes me around. it will be a fine balance. if anyone can do i want i think it might be him. also we are getting a firsthand look, which actually joe will be touching on as it pertains to his book but we're getting a firsthand look at how many americans have enrolled in obama care, and for the white house the numbers are not good. the "wall street journal" reports that so far 50,000 people have signed up for private coverage or medicaid through the government website. so, not good news at all in terms of the white house trying to roll out this health care plan. so why don't we hear more from joe about his book "the right path." he's on the "today" show. here now is savannah. >> there are some surprises on
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the republican side. joe scarborough hosts "morning joe" and the author avenue book "the right path." joe, good morning. >> great to be here. >> i got ask you about this poll. we're polling 2016 already. >> exactly. only three years away. >> we put christie up against clinton. clinton gets 44% of the vote. christie gets 34%. how likely do you think that's match-up we'll see. >> we don't know. remember the last election in 2011 we were talking about whether it was going to be mitt romney or not. 2007 we believed rudy giuliani would take on hillary clinton. this could change a lot. republicans have their same challenges. you go inside these numbers in these same polls and where does chris christie win. he wins with old people, white guys and the rich. not exactly transformative. >> when you look dmeep to our
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polls the republicans aren't united airlines around chris christie. you are calling on the republican party to do some soul searching and your argument is do you want to be ideologically pure or win elections. >> we've been having these ideological witch hunts in the past six months. people going on tv if you don't agree with us we have to shut down the government then you're not sufficiently conservative. as i've been saying that's like a football coach deciding that if you don't run up the middle when it's fourth and 31 that somehow you aren't sufficiently tough. that's not the case. we have to start playing smart. it's not about compromising, it's not being liberal, it's about figuring out how to reach the middle of the electorate that chris christie did in new jersey nuclear weapon don't disappoint in this book. >> but, you have never known me to do this. how many pictures of matt do you have? >> i'll share. that's an early holiday present for you.
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>> i'll just skip the holidays and go straight to the new year. >> let me read part of your book. you say this may come as a shock to certain ideology and profit driven talk radio hosts. but parties win the white house by nominating candidate who win the most votes not feeding endlessly on base resentments that offend crossover voters and sling the gop's poll. >> it's not a problem for them. they make millions of dollars. i don't mock that. but when they start pushing their world view on republicans across the country and start saying you either have to run up to the barricades and fight to the defath every single time. and you have politicians not understanding that's a profit motive. let them make their millions of dollars. but we have to stop feeding every single little resentment. we can control the house of representatives but as we've
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seen that's not enough. if we want a more conservative country and a better world, if you're a conservative, we got start wink athletics. >> before i let you go. when a politician or a recovering politician writes a book like this i wonder are you thinking about running for president yourself? >> absolutely not. there's too many pictures of me like that. no. why would i do that? why would he do that. >> i thought you were talking about your presidential run. >> these pictures. >> joe, don't say i never gave you anything. >> is that a definitive no? >> no. i will never -- who let him do this. what's wrong with you people? >> won't let you keep that. >> will you run for president in 2016? >> no, absolutely not. >> thank you for being definitive. >> i have a 10-year-old daughter. she says she has to get out of high school first. okay. joe on the "today" show talking about the right path. and as we look ahead we were
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talking about the obama care numbers, chuck todd. 50,000 have signed up. in oregon one of the states running their own exchanges not a single person has enrolled. >> they haven't even started their exchange. >> obama administration officials were hoping to sign up 500,000 people in the month of october. how bad are these numbers? there are, of course, coming back out with some counter arguments including medicaid and those who are being denied access to that which, you know, may be true. the bottom line is this is on the white house. >> it is. there's no spin in these numbers at all. cbo says they have to have 7 million signed up in the first year. at a minimum they need 3 million signed up in the first year to make the numbers work. so if you look at it justin six months open enrollment that's why 500,000 is the goal, right. that's the math there.
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and that's what they need to average. if you throw in the state exchanges i've seen some estimates that the 15 state exchanges will account for almost the same number as the federal exchanges so here the state exchanges most of which are running a lot smoother, oregon aside. most of them running a lot smoother than the federal exchange. we'll find out in the month of october butts 100,000 sign up, maybe plus or minus a little bit more. that still puts them way behind where they need be. you know, a nonworking website for the first couple of weeks where it was almost not working at all, i guess we shouldn't be surprised at this number. i saw one person, one expert in the health care fourteenth amendment say these numbers are higher than i thought they would be given all the problems, but that's not much to cling to if you're in the white house. >> john mecham >> walter, you've written biographies of brilliant and complicated people not unlike our president. what would kissinger or steve
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jobs do about this roll out? would they hit the pause button and -- >> both of them would lose their temper. you know, one of the good things about president obama is that he's on an even kiel, he's cool, he keeps his perspective. he's looking and we should look at the broader perspective which is it's important to have people who are moving from job to job or between jobs or young and not working for big firms or unions who don't automatically get health care coverage to be able to get it. i assume there's going to be a pent up demand, my daughter's friends in their 20s or 30s saying i would love to be part of an economy where i could be part of a start up, but i need health care. there's a demand for this and this will be remembered as a really bad glitch but a few months glitch. you know steve jobs he put out a couple of products that failed too. it takes a while. that is why they invent phrases
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like 2.0 and companies like apple. >> all right. we want to get to the latest in the koifr efforts following the super typhoon that hit philippines. the situation has quickly turned critical with survivors unable to leave the storm ravage region. millions of people are now in desperate need of food, water and medical supplies. nbc's harry smith reports. >> reporter: it is an achingly familiar site. the aftermath of this typhoon looks a lot like the remnants of other super disasters. what we learned from the tsunami in japan and the tsunami in the indian ocean and our own superstorm sandy is that the unrelenting water knows no boundary. every building is earth significantly damaged or destroyed. 15 to 20-foot wave came across entire villages. so everything is wiped out. the city of tacloban looks to be ground zero. >> survive because i climb tree. >> reporter: we met this woman
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not far from the ruins of the airport. >> very happy because i'm alive. i'm alive. >> reporter: she and her family are huddled in a makeshift shelter because there is nothing left of their homes. >> we don't have anything. we survive the typhoon and now we're questioning ourselves how to survive in terms of food in terms of water. >> reporter: a nearby chapel serves as a makeshift morgue. a father tells me his 2-year-old son is inside. he explains how fast the water rose. he wonders how anyone survived. people in this once bustling city of 200,000 have seen many typhoons before. but nothing like this. they are without food. without drinkable water. they have no adequate shelter. our colleague is in another part of the decimated city. >> the local marketplace one of the worst affected areas in tacloban, only shops of houses
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made of wood now a pile of tangled timber. she shows me the house one of few made of concrete that her father shell terrified in. >> we're not able to save our father. very sad. >> reporter: this typhoon was different because it moved so rapidly. because it was moving so fast and the winds were so ferocious it piled up water in front of it. what you need to remember about the philippines it's not one land mass it's more than 7,000 islands in a place like this the water just stacked up as it moved into the bays and channels and once the water rose it knocked down everything in sight. there's no power. no fuel. roads and bridges are out. many coastal areas have not yet been searched. because communications are out, there's frankly no way to know the status of the more isolated communities. we hitched a ride with the u.s. marines on a c-130 into
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tacloban. the u.s. military is ferrying in philippine troops by the hundreds and often carrying storm victims out. while aid is beginning to arrive, it is but a trickle in an ocean of need. >> if you would like to help there are several organizations accepting donations. you can go to redcross.org, americare george, unicef.org or safethechildren.org. if you can help in any way please do. this is beyond devastating. walter isaacson, great to have you on the show as always. chuck, we'll see you coming up on the daily rundown. up next former michigan governor jennifer granholm with a look inside the new hillary clinton super p.a.c. plus steve schmidt joins the conversation. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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♪ chris christie appeared on all four sunday shows to talk about how much he didn't want to talk about the presidential race. >> governor, how interested are you in running for president in 2016? >> well, chris, what i'm interested in doing is being the governor of new jersey. what i'm focused on is doing my job in the state of new jersey. i'm the governor of new jersey. for me i'm the governor of new jersey and my job is to run the state of new jersey. >> yes he's just the gonch of new jersey. that's why he went on meet the jersey, fox news jersey sunday, face the turnpike and this new jersey new jersey new
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jerseyopolis. >> okay. 22 past the hour. here with us now former democratic governor from michigan jennifer granholm and information mccain senior campaign strategist steve schmidt. >> talking about chris christie, there's a new members news "wall street journal" poll that talks about how deeply divided chris christie has made the republican party. chris christie has nailed down half of the support. if you got 32% and the field has 31%, that's pretty good. >> absolutely. he starts as a prospective republican candidate for president. really strong shape. we'll have a big field. one of the interesting dichotomies you look ahead to the 2016 race is the split in the republican party both ideological but see it manifest the governors brackett and the congressional gop brackett and i think you're going to see more than a couple of governors in
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the mix running against the most unpopular wing of the party in the history of recorded polls. >> what do you say to people and nbc news quoted a tea party leader who said chris christie is no different than harry reid. how do you reason with somebody that is that clueless? just look at what chris christie did standing up to public union, being hated, being attacked, he stood his ground, he's for lower taxes. i'm not carrying his water, whatsoever, because i would like to hear more about chris christie. i would have preferred he used this time to talk about a bold new reform agenda. he hasn't done that. it's more about chris christie. there identify said the obligatory negative thing about chris christie. now i can ask the question who in the hell can look at chris christie and say he's like harry reid. those people can't be reasoned with. they are rhinos. they don't understand what i want means to be a republican or
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a conservative. they don't under what it's like to win elections. >> now listen don't hold back. >> national elections they don't get it. >> there's an important warning for what you just said for chris christie. it's this. you have to show not tell. you can't go around the country defining your conservatism by what you did in the past in new jersey. you have to lay out a vision for the future of the country, how to get this country moving. ronald reagan never went around the country saying i'm a conservative. when you talk about conservatism through the prism of the definition you end up like mitt romney using terms i'm a severely conservative governor and everybody knows you're not. the way chris christie gets around this is by offering a bold forward looking governing vision that's based in conservative principles for the country and that will be his challenge in the race. >> the republican party youc
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obviously divided. looks like you guys -- >> take your time. you guys figure it out. >> can i get an invitation. would like to see the coronation. >> i'm in new york because ready for hilary which is this super p.a.c. of grassroots people. >> would are worth billions of dollars. >> the finance committee is here. 170 of them as the finance committee. but there's over 500,000 people who have already pledged to help her. 1.1 million people signed up for the ready for hilary website. >> that's amazing. >> here's my question, governor. i'll just read the front page of the "huffington post." wall street freaks over warren run. so we know elizabeth warren's message would be. she's not running.
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tell me what hillary clinton's message is. >> well she hasn't decided to run yet either. >> we know she's been in public life. >> what does she stand for. why are we ready for hilary? >> we're ready for hilary because she will be a fighter for people too. the thing about elizabeth warren. she said she's not going to run. she signed is a letter apparently urging hillary clinton to run. it's very early. >> what is elizabeth warren's message would be. i know what it is in two lines. what's hilary's. >> she hasn't decided to run. clearly she will be somebody who trump pepts the democratic and progressive values. it's not as though she will be on a different page. >> i think she's amazing. >> she is. she hasn't started to run. give her a chance to craft her campaign. >> is that the message? >> that's part of the message. >> one day maybe a republican
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can win. >> jobs in america. she's going to focus -- she would. who knows. if she were going to run i guess it's one of the pieces is jobs in america. >> no doubt jobs in america, making government work. the dichotomy with republicans who believe we should shrink it. she will talk about narrowing this income inequality gap. she doesn't have to reinvent herself just revitalize. >> her jordan in the senate, her record as first lady, record as secretary of state shouldn't it add up to a message you know. >> she's a tough conservative. >> there's two types of elections. there's change elections and more of the same election. if you look at where we are
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right now it looks like we're heading in to a change election. that gives the republican candidate particularly if they are from outside of washington, particularly if they are a governor or they are a governor in a succeeding red state it gives them a great platform to run on. >> but hilary represents change. just the name hilary represents change. >> we'll see if hilary can bring a change message after eight years of barack obama. but for sure as you look at the democratic primary, there will be an ideological challenge to hillary clinton's left in the democratic primary and we'll see how that works out over the course of the election. >> there will definitely be a contrast with what the republicans are offering and that contrast would not bode well for republicans in terms of their excluding groups. what will they do on immigration reform. she will be in favor of immigration reform. what will they do about having government have a role in helping people get jobs. they don't want the goff to have
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a role. they don't want government to be involved in health care. they don't want government to be involved in education. she wants government to work for people. >> we can do down the list showing how unpopular barack obama's policies are. you talk about jobs two to one margin americans disagree how he's handling jobs and economy. you look at the front page of the "wall street journal." the gap between rich and poor in this recovery is only increasing even more. i don't think democrats have this thing locked down, harold, that somehow they represent the last best hope for the working class who are struggling right now because right now most americans really disagree with the way barack obama is handling this. larry summers is saying hey you know what all of our plans for 2009 they didn't work after all. >> a couple of things. one if you look at how the markets have performed under barack obama it's hard to deny that he's bean president that's enjoyed great success with
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market wealth. >> wall street. >> but it's not just wall street. people who have investments in the market have seen their housing prices rise. >> herald if you're walking around-the-house and not watching the tv set. 31% of americans approve of the president's handling of the economy. 65% disapprove. you contrast this with record low numbers for the republican party now, harold, boy washington is out of favor. and this -- >> what she has to do is take the best of what he's done and also talk about a change and reform and where we take america. i would agree with steve. >> what have we done in a positive since for middle class america? >> it's hard to deny our car companies are where they are we were afraid to take risks there too. there's no doubt. the economy is not where we want it to be. he's seen job growth every month. is it where it should be? of course not. it's almost like the challenge after clinton and reagan how did
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george w. handle. you got to take the best of what they do and then talk about a reform agenda. >> before we go to break -- so looking at a record, jennifer granholm i'll ask you again what's her message. why are reready for hilary. you hear she's running you're so glad she's running because she stands for. >> she will fight for people in america. she will make sure they get jobs, have health care, make sure their children are educated, make sure america is on twhop it comes to our global economic competitors. she will represent democratic values. she believes largely in make being sure that we are a family and that no one gets left behind in a family. she's going to craft her own message. those are democratic values. but it's exciting that there's some people who are excited about the possibility. >> hope and change is like 2008 all over again. i'm tingling all over.
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>> a chill up and down your leg. >> exactly. let's talk about something to be excited about and that's downtown detroit. we went there. >> yeah. >> uaw working together to save a lot of american jobs and you go downtown and they have a core of -- downtown, $11 billion in new economic investments. some good things happening in detroit. >> there are some good things happening including an election. mike duggan is the new mayor who represents change. he was my boss at one point. yeah. he's going a terrific mover. he's somebody who is impatient for change. he's a fix it guy. so once they get through the bankruptcy thing and that's playing all defense, obviously, he can unleash offense on detroit. come to detroit, 60,000 vacant lots. if you can use land as an opportunity to attract
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entrepreneurs, international companies who want to have michigan be the gateway to the u.s. you name it urban pioneers an exciting moment for detroit. >> former governor jennifer granholm thank you so much. coming up, a fleeing suspect and a state trooper fall from a 35-foot overpass. what led to the chase and what happened to both of them when "morning joe" continues. [ male announcer ] what if a small company
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♪ all right. 37 past the hour. let's look at the morning papers. we'll start with saginaw news. what should have been a routine traffic stop in saginaw erupted into a dramatic pursuit. officer pulls up to the scene dash cam captures the moment the suspect climbs over a highway overpass and falls 35 feet. a state trooper followed him down. both men were hurt but survived the fall. >> the telegraph writes police in italy are crediting pope francis for a surge in mass attendance in what's dubbed the
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francis effect. five years ago there was a similar mecham effect. >> different. >> moonshine ravaged parts of appalachian. survey of 250 italian priests more than half say they've seen a rise in their congregations since the pontiff took office. reporting a tourism boom in rome. and francisco becoming the most popular baby name in italy. >> write that down, harold. in "usa today" google will offer more option for music. it will include a sound search which allow use towers identify a song that's playing. also a new voice command will play music on demand from services google play and all access. the company also developed ear buds which -- >> we tried those things. authors pretty cool. >> very cool. amazing what they can do. are we ever going to interact with other human being?
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>> i hope not. that's the good news. >> i hear we have another human being on the other side of the break. >> really? >> yeah. >> good lord. up next several yurn allies are outraged over nsa spying and it hasn't made much of a ripple in the uk. we'll ask britain's shadow chancellor of the exchecker, ed balls about that and signs of economic growth across the pond. we'll be right back. ng out of pipe.
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i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. hing, helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping ♪ 43 past the hour. here with us now, britain's shadow chancellor, ed balls. ed, good to have you back. how have you been? >> super. >> do you have gift? >> i do. i brought for joe a special gift from new york, this is a new york city canary shirt, especially four. they want to you go watch a
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game. on the upper west side at keeley's bar. >> i would guess, i'm one of the few new yorkers that have actually been to norwich to see a game. it's perfect. >> your viewers have no idea what we're talking about. >> absolutely no idea. that's okay. >> no idea. >> so let's talk. how is the economy doing. last time we were there we were talking you guys were struggling around. very flat economy. almost upside down. any improvement since then? >> after three years we got some growth back in the economy. a bit like the american debate here for families things are worst. living standards are still going down. a huge squeeze. so the whole politics now in britain is how do you get a recovery which actually works for working people. >> i was going to ask you, "wall street journal," one of
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the lead stories, job gap wideened in an uneven recovery. we're getting people back to work but a lot of it is people flipping burgers, taking two jobs, three jobs. so uneven. some problems in britain. >> people are being forced to work part time not full time. bigger issue in britain in america it's lack of jobs in britain, it's actually what's happening to people's wages. we've had 39 of the last 40 months where wages have gone up less than prices. so every month people get worse off and worse off. >> we're having that problem too with the minimum wage. >> falling further and further behind. >> people can't make end meet on a full time wage. it's huge political challenge. if you maintain support for economies that are open where you invest and let the market work it's got to work for work people. >> it has to be a living. >> work doesn't pay.
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we're doing this conference with larry summers how do you have a prosperity that works for all and not just a few. unless we make our economies work instead of people thinking i'll be better off than i was, my kids will be better off than me you start to get powerful forces saying let's turn away from business from open trade that's dangerous. >> larry summers on tomorrow. >> what's the linkage at this point between uk prosperity and american prosperity. >> i think america has been ahead of britain for the last four or five years. you're now well above where you were before the financial crisis. we're still quite a long way behind. we have a lot of catching up to do. your growth is twice the fast. but even as growth emerges there's this real squeeze on living standards. if anything this time around the american unemployment has been more stubbornly high than britain. our big squeeze on living standards. we have the exact same problem you have to get productivity
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moving, investment rising and that's will translate into wages and we need to have a different kind of economy, an economy where people think if i work hard i'm going to get some return. where people think i work hard -- >> fall further and further behind. >> yeah. >> on this topic, i appreciate your talk, how is the nsa situation here in america being perceived in britain? we heard talk across europe, obviously, dealing with aftermath of learning miss merkel's phone might have been tapped. how are the brits dealing with this? >> we've always had a very strong and close relationship, worked very closely together on these issues. >> u.s. and britain. >> we appreciate that. nobody wants to see lives put at risk or intelligence sources compromised and so in fact that relationship is important. it's got to be done in a way in which people think is proper and
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open and done in a way which is correct in law. actually what we're realizing in britain the u.s. surveillance of its own surveillance operation, the work done by congress is actually been more effective, more open than in the uk. we got a bit of catching up to do. it's causing some problems and doubts. guardian newspaper has been very effective in campaigning. we got to strike a balance to make sure things to keep us safe are done but not in a way where people think it's stepping outside of the law. >> ed balls always good to see you. >> great to see you. let me ask you will i get -- >> tuesday or wednesday night. >> what are you all -- >> joe and i we know all the fixtures for every game. >> of course. he knows it's going to be on a wednesday. liverpool is doing pretty well. >> liverpool has the best strike
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force. >> isn't that amazing. it's pretty fun. >> liverpool is a team in the last few years have disappointed and they have potential and the potential is coming through. >> ed thanks for being here. >> up next the real football. we'll talk to hines ward. you're watching "morning joe." >> you're a marxist. what's wrong with her? my mantra? family first.
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nbc sports analyst and former wide receiver of the pittsburgh steelers, hines ward. obviously we want to talk about what's going on in miami, but first what happened in hawaii, man, in october. talk about it. >> you know what, for me to participate in the ironman world championships in kona, hawaii, it was brutal but so rewarding to cross the finish line and hearing mike riley say hines ward, you're an ironman. for me, i wouldn't change anything in the world to go through that experience and be a part of the become one program. that's kind of a journey -- a journal of kind of highlighting the whole process of me starting, taking a guy who's never ran over a mile to find a way to cross the finish line all the way in kona.
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>> man, i have no idea what it's like. and i don't want to. but, you know, i hear so many people say that run marathons it's not really about the legs, it's about the mind. it's about just willing yourself. it's about surviving. and this is a more extreme version of that. >> it is. i actually finished the race in 13:08, 13 hour, 8 minutes. when you're out there, you know, it was a lot of soul searching, a lot of digging within and finding out about yourself. a will to finish and get the job done. so for me like i say, just going through the whole experience, it was a truly big honor for me that not too many people can say they're an inman. >> amazing. let's talk about miami. we all hear these sort of things just go on in locker rooms. you're not so sure. talk about the steelers locker room. did you have voice mails like that left for you? >> no, no. for me in the locker room when you use the "n" word you really can't play around with that, especially coming from, you
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know, a white player. >> white guy. >> to an african-american player. that's a word you really don't -- >> anybody do that in all your years of playing? >> no, never. that's why it's so unique about the story. i really don't know the details behind it. when you have a relationship like that, i can't recall anyone, my best friend, using that "n" word, being a white guy referring to an african-american player. >> you're biracial. >> yes. >> jonathan martin's biracial. how does that change the dynamic of the race relations as it happens inside the locker room? >> for me growing up as a child, had to deal with a lot of bullying and being teased because you're different. for me, it was hard to really fit in, to really find my identity as a child growing up. so i can understand and relate to jonathan martin's situation of you really don't know how to deal with the teasing or the bullying. and for him the best way for him is just to walk away from the situation. so aapplaud him from that and being the bigger man. >> talk about maybe this guy,
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incognito, was trying to toughen jonathan martin up. do you buy that? how do players toughen up younger players? i don't buy it far lot of reasons, but i'm curious to get your sense being in the locker room. >> like i said, i don't know the dynamics of the whole story other than what we hear from the outside story. but clearly it's more to just the name-calling because, you know, i mean, incognito's perspective, he's thinking this is my best friend and this is how we communicated with each other. >> unusual. >> yeah. it's crazy. so it's an unfortunate incident. i think it's bad for the miami dolphins. also i think it's bad for the nfl. >> really quickly, put on your analyst hat. somebody asks you a question off air that i have to ask on air. who's the best quarterback in the nfl? >> oh, man, you put me on the spot. >> i'm going to give answer if you don't, man. >> you know what, there's a group of guys. >> a group of guys. they're all winners. >> peyton, tom brady, drew
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brees, aaron rodgers. >> obviously at the top of their game. >> yes. >> peyton this year coming back from the neck injury. what a year. >> having a phenomenal year. of course we have a big game on sunday night with the broncos and the chiefs. >> how do you explain the chiefs success? >> it's parity through the league and throughout the whole league. i think, you know, that's what's so exciting about the nfl because you never know. i mean, a team who was the worst team last year now all of a sudden undefeated. it makes for a great season this year. >> hines, congratulations. >> thank you, guys. >> on the ironman. that's something that you can take with you the rest of your life. >> yes. >> with those battered knees now. right? >> i'm so happy i did it, though. >> just great. by the way, my kids -- >> talking about it? >> they need a shirt like that. >> good for -- all hockey players do it now. >> great recovery. >> chocolate milk at hockey rinks. >> i love it. i'm going to play hockey. i got to learn to skate first.
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hines, thank you so much. >> thank you guys. >> great job. coming up next, we've got ken burns. obviously an award winning filmmaker. he'll be with us. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. "it's time to get the heck out of dodge?" [ chuckles ] i say you get the heck into one.
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whoa. that would be pub day. >> yes, sir. >> loaded. >> joe's new book. >> in paper back. >> "the right path" by joe scarborough is about the future of the republican party. actually, he and meacham right there started things off at columbia last night. how did that go, meacham? joe won't tell me. >> they're still clapping. think about morningside heights. it's open to republican ideas. >> that looks great. >> actually, ifls surprised at the number of republicans that were bussed in. >> were there any? did they buss them in? >> they bussed them in. >> how many raised their hands? >> from nutley. actually, you know what, very good student questions. and they were clearly college republicans. >> this looks fantastic. >> they weren't college republicans. i will tell you, though, their questions were the questions you hear from younger people all the time who -- they just aren't ideological. you can tell they're skeptical of idealism -- i mean
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ideologues, whether republicans or democrats. it was a great event and we want to thank miles nadal because miles actually got a book and handed it out to everybody. >> we're going to be talking act miles all week. >> and dr. sax. >> jeffrey sax. he was there, he was great, introduced us. >> then he went off to a sake-fueled -- >> it was sad. >> he said he was a parody of himself. >> we have msnbc political analyst and visiting professor at nyu, harold ford jr. demand washington, editorial director of the "national journal," ron fournier, and really rea willie is a little scruffier today. >> don't patronize me. >> you have to talk to god. i'm letting it go. >> here and here there's nothing. >> go with god. >> can i cut in for you? >> stop. >> i was at the alabama/lsu
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game. >> did you go? >> saturday. roll tide. i got to tell you, people down there love you. i'm serious. they love joe scarborough. 200 times on my way from the president's -- >> screaming bodies. >> the president's box -- >> you said you were with the people. >> i was. from the tailgate to the party walking over, the people are nuts about you. they obviously don't know you very well, but these people -- >> we'll try and keep it that way. >> they are amazing. >> between the suv and the suv? >> you remember, we did that walk, yon. >> we're going to begin with what's on front of "the wall street journal." numbers finally leased on enrolling for the affordable care act. >> we're getting a look at how many americans have been enrolled in affordable care act and for the white house the numbers are terrible. "the wall street journal" reports so far around 50,000 people have signed up for private coverage or medicaid
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through the government website. and in oregon, one of the states running their own exchanges, not a single person has enrolled. obama administration officials were hoping to sign up at least 500,000 people in the month of october. an additional report says the white house is now looking to boost enrollment numbers by including individuals who have selected coverage but have not sent in their first payment. meanwhile, both federal and state officials are saying the issues with healthcare.gov have presented tens of thousands of low-income americans from successfully signing up for medicaid. the botched rollout continues. >> ron fournier, you've been covering this up close. it's staggering, whether you talk about a possibility of identity theft -- it doesn't matter what part of it. this has been botched. there will be books written on this at some point. obviously the blame starts at the top with the president and kathleen sebelius. but it looks like a systemic breakdown. it doesn't look like you can just point at the people at the
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very top. there are a lot of people up and down the food chain that just failed miserably on this. >> yeah. that's to me the most disturbing part of this. it is systemic. it goes to the heart of the democratic party's argument, an argument a lot of people have, that government can do good things really well. if we can't get this right it really undermines that entire argument. >> that's an argument, too, ron, that you've said very publicly in this case you supported, that you -- >> i did. >> you want this for personal reasons, not for professional reasons. you want this to work for personal reasons. and there are millions of people like that, which makes this all the more -- all the more just unbelievable to people who believe that the government can do big things and do it well. >> it's not just a personal thing. i have two older daughters who have already been able to take advantage of obama care, but any american, whether you're a small government conservative or big government liberal or like most
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of america, you just want government to work, that's the point. we just want government to work. when our president and leaders or governors say this is going to happen, we have to have some confidence it will work and if it doesn't work they'll be honest about its failure, and neither one of those things happened in this case. >> willie, i can't believe that somebody in the white house isn't just saying let's delay this for six months, let's start all over. zero people in oregon, a fairly progressive state, have enrolled in this. the numbers are terrible. >> it seems to be moving that direction. but that would be such a major concession and such a major loss for the white house to have to admit it didn't work and we have to start over and that it cannot be fixed. ron, you've written about this a lot. the white house and many progressive who is defend the white house say come on, guys, this is about a website. we're talking about something so much bigger, which is reforming the american health care system. the website glitches, which obviously are much more than glitches at this point, will be a bump in the road along the road to history. so do you buy that? do you believe that we can still
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get big reformation on the system and this will be in the rear-view mirror at some point? >> i can't predict the future, but the game's not over yet. at the end of the day, this will be more of a personal decision than a political decision. if americans another six weeks, six day, can't be six months, are able to go on -- this is more than just a website. it is the front door to this, you know, huge social change, if they're able to go there and make a reasonable choice and they find that they have better health care and/or at a lower cost, this will be a bump in the road and the president will go down in history as somebody who's accomplished something big. if it doesn't work and if the they keep deceiving us about it, he's going to go down in history as something other than a great president. >> well, and i think there's still time. there definitely is still time to put this in the rear-view mirror. it's ugly to watch it at this point. the white house, though, is pushing back against the negative health care stories by laying partial blame on local and state officials. on the white house blog, the
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administration points out that as many as 5.4 million americans could gain access to medicaid under obama care but are being denied by elected state official who is refuse to expand the program. researchers at the urban institute also estimate that as many as 144,000 veterans below the poverty line are among those being denied. >> i had two people raise their arms like this. >> but you know what, the republicans are doing the same thing. you can watch every glitch there and go like that. the website didn't work. we got it. >> local officials, though, did a horrible job during katrina, but at the end of the day, george w. bush still, appropriately, bore the responsibility. >> sure. >> for the failure of -- >> i don't think anyone's not taking responsibility. >> well, the white house is trying to not take responsibility here. >> no. they're just pointing out that everyone's making it difficult. it's not just their own botched rollout, which they take responsibility for. >> okay. >> but every step of the way, every step of the way the republicans have tried to
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undermine this from top to bottom and p anything they were probably part of the problem. >> that's absolutely true, which makes it even more important to make the damn thing work. >> that's right. boy, do i want that to happen. >> so, arguing that, well, all right, the federal thing isn't working either, but by god, because the republicans in the states aren't letting medicaid happen, things are really -- >> think about that. >> i always had an attitude when i went into a campaign, like my family would be shocked when people would run negative ads and lie about me and all this stuff. i said that's like being shocked, guys -- like that's like a boxer walking into a boxing ring and being shocked that somebody's trying to take your head off. >> exactly. >> it's what happens. so the white house can sit back and be shocked that republicans are trying to knock their head off, but it's what democrats did to bush, it's what we did to clinton. it's the nature of the game.
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and you've got to be smart enough, like john said, if you know they're coming to knock your head off, you have to be ready and even smarter. >> i've not heard it said that republicans are the reason that the website is facing the challenges that it's facinging. if they are, that argument should come forward and we should explain it. it's clearly untrue. two, ron said at the beginning his young daughters signed up for obama care. the program is only able to sustain itself if young, healthy people who are paying into the system are signing up. otherwise the whole premise of the idea begins to falter. president is right, we should find more governors that will allow those to sign up under medicaid. the challenge is you create financial stress in -- not bigger problems but put greater stress on the system. you need younger people to sign up. the focus ought to be understanding what's gone wrong and fixing this thing, whether it takes two months, four months, six months, joe, to your point, fix that. limping along serves no purpose. and there's so much confusion among business people in the country. i was talking to a ceo in detroit yesterday, a decent
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sized company, great revenue, employs about 400 people, says i don't understand how this is to work. we don't understand intermediate or long term what the costs will be. he's a democrat and wants to be supportive. for three reasons they need to figure out -- >> totally agree. ron, i just think that the medicaid story is just another sign of how difficult this process has been. i mean, that is party that had a group of people that held the government hostage to try and get rid of a law that was passed by the government and approved by the supreme court in every way, shape, and form. i mean, it's just another example of them getting in the way of anything happening for this presidency. >> there's no doubt the republican party -- the republican party has set itself up to really be hurt badly by the democratic party. i think if they're not careful they're heading on a path towards extinction in a lot of ways. they're doing some terrible things. but you know what, you don't play the same game they are. you don't -- >> they're not.
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>> -- the least common denominator. the best way to counter what republicans are doing would be to come out with a website that works, come out with a program that works the way you promise it, be honest with the american public from the beginning, would be not to inflate the numbers they're putting out now. it would be to lead. you're right. the republican party, you know, there are no saints here right now. there's no saints anywhere in washington right now, and that's a problem. where are the adults in the room? >> decisive saks what's needed here. and by the way, decisive action is taking down the website, delaying it six months, and saying this didn't work, but you know what, we're not interested in the first six months. we're interested in the first 60 years. so we're going to take this by -- not to use an overused military analogy, but i'm going to use an overused military analogy because it's one of the greatest analogies. yeah, i talked about you don't run up the middle on 4th and 31,
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but george washington showed us one of the most important battles in the revolutionary war was the retreat from long island over the manhattan. it saved the continental army. it saved this country in the summer of 1776, and we are here with these flags behind us because george washington knew when he had to take decisive action and get away from the british. sometimes a retreat is a decisive action that can help you win the larger battle. it seems to me the white house needs to do that quickly because it's dribbling along. it's terrible for this process. >> one question is, which is always a question for presidents, is who has either the credibility or the guts to walk in and say that to the president? >> nobody. >> that's the problem. >> could the vice president do it? could the chief of staff do it? secretary of health and human services? it's very hard. george w. bush used to say
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people would be out in the waiting room of the oval office saying i'm going to tell him what-all, and they'd come in and say, oh, what a lovely tie. >> isn't there a concern if you wait six months that the party that's been trying to undermine this every step of the way will dig their fingernails back in? they have said they have a deadline and it will work. if it doesn't, i'm going to throw myself off. two weeks from now. >> the problem with that, mika, is that you're right, the republicans have done everything they can to undermine this, but so have the democrats, not intentionally, but what they've done is undermine this. jim had a good word there, credibility. the problem we have is government has no credibility. the president is losing his credibility. how are we going to get those young millennials to sign up and get insurance that they don't think they need if they don't believe it's going to work and they don't believe the president will be straight with them? >> at some point if you watch this every day, if you're considering enrolling and you can't enroll and haven't been able to enroll the entire program loses credibility and you lose people who thought they might be invested over time.
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so you could shut it down for six months but i agree with mika, that is exactly what republicans and some democrats have been asking, to say, see, we told you, they weren't ready for prime time. this is never going to work. >> i'm for the program. i want it to work. i think there may be people around a table who want to see this thing work that have been there from the beginning. but if it doesn't work, there's no need to kid ourselves. let's fix it. the challenge with my len yawli signing um, they're now discouraged. why go forward. i hear what everyone's saying but i'm willing to take that cal lated risk because it's not working now and the president's credibility is on the line. when he goes forward and says -- >> legacy. >> -- it's going to make people question if he can deliver. >> coming up on "morning joe," political plit coe's mike allen. and if kids needed another reason not to post things onl e online. more and more colleges are scanning students' social media. >> did you see this "new york
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times" piece yesterday? >> so important. but they don't get it. they don't believe this advice. they think that they can put anything out there. >> kids with great s.a.t. scores and great gpas -- >> check out your facebook page and twitter. >> admissions offices are looking at facebook pages and twitter and not accepting them. >> pictures of kids drinking. they put stupid pictures of themselves. first here's bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill? >> speaking of someone who would never post anything that's a little risque, right? as far as the forecast is going this morning, snow as advertised has fall en in the big apple. over the last hour the temperatures plummeted. you can see a little bit here, see the top of some of the buildings, looking down towards times square. at the ground level, a lot melting as it hits the ground. there are some snowflakes reported in central park. many other areas too. you can see the radar, showing up in massachusetts, connecticut, first snow showers
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for boston, providence, even philadelphia. looks like baltimore to d.c., it's kind of dried up a little bit. doesn't look like you'll see your first flakes today. the cold air is moving all the way to the deep south. this is an air mass we've seen late december, early january. the temperatures on the map tell the story. look at the windchill right now. st. louis, chicago, kansas city, omaha, teens all the way across into the great lakes heading for tennessee, kentucky, later tonight mississippi, alabama, louisiana. for a lot of us, it will be the coldest temperatures we' seen since last winter, even with sunshine today. only 36 in kansas city, same for you in st. louis. in the deep south, get ready, later on tonight the cold air will be right over the top of you. we'll be down to 24 in little rock. there are freeze warnings out. if you have plants out there, this will be the end of the growing season for much of texas, louisiana, mississippi, alabama, around central georgia, right around atlanta down to about 29. thankfully this warm-up will be very quick as we go towards the end of the week, we'll warm up
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in a hurry. just in time. they put the tree up two days ago and already it's snowing. who orders this stuff up? makes you want to go shopping. you're watching "morning joe." when our little girl was born, we got a subaru. it's where she said her first word. (little girl) no! saw her first day of school. (little girl) bye bye! made a best friend forever. the back seat of my subaru is where she grew up. what? (announcer) the subaru forester. (girl) what? (announcer) motor trend's two thousand fourteen sport utility of the year. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru.
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time for a look at the morning papers. "the tampa tribune," the fbi now, the modern-day bonnie and clyde after allegedly robbing -- they robbed 15 banks in florida and alabama. emmanuel lee williams and kara lee williams are accused of using disguises and notes to
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demand money. a surveillance video from a bank in ft. myers shows a man who looks like williams. if found guilty, they face up to 20 years in prison. >> and "the new york times," college applicants better think twice before they tweet. a survey reveals 31% of college admission officers look at an applicant's social media profile. 30% say what they found actually hurt the applicants' chances of getting into their colleges. and most colleges don't have formal policies for searching prospective students online, but they do it. and they should. >> oh my gosh. of course. the vancouver sun, the ceo of lululemon apologized after saying his company's pricey yoga pants, quote, don't work for some women's bodies. >> yeah. >> hello! the controversy started when chip wilson said the company's yoga pans only became see-through because of the rubbing of women's thighs. >> yeah. >> he posted this video. this gets worse and worse and
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worse -- on the company's youtube channel. >> hello. i'm chip wilson, founder of lululemon. i'd like to talk to you about the last few days of media that's occurred around the bloomberg video. i'm sad -- i'm really sad. i'm sad for the repercussions of my actions. i'm sad for the people of lululemon who i care so much about that have really had to face the brunt of my actions. i take responsibility for all that has occurred and the impact it has had on you. >> you know, i think, first of all, just a terrible video. but secondly, i'm thinking just looking at him from here up, his thighs probably rub together too. >> i'm thinking they touch. >> when he -- >> joe says they do. >> jen? >> absolutely. >> you see that? he's got a thigh problem too. >> it came from inside. >> he's fighting his own demons. so the "usa today" research is showing the number of driver who is surf the web while behind the
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wheel is on the rise. state farm insurance the number has doubled. drivers who are 18 to 29 of course are the worst at it and that number has jumped almost 50%. >> and this is from cnbc's home page. we've all heard of flipping loans for cash. now billionaires are taking the practice a step further, spending millions to flip their megajets. thanks to high demand for the rare gulf stream g-650 jet, some owners are turning profits of as much as $7 million for a sale. since the g-650 launched last year, only about 35 hit the market. buyers have been willing to pay out as much as $70 million for the jet. who? what? >> we should ask carol what those things are like. >> carol, did you get one? >> have you been on one of those thing, harold? >> the last time i was on one we were all together. >> oh, that is just cold. why do you -- wow.
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why do you hate when loving would be so much easier, harold ford jr.? >> you interpreted that wrong. i love you. i want to go back with you. so please invite me again. >> look at you. we are on the air here. >> this is kind of awkward. >> i don't know what he's talking about. >> where were we going? >> are you talking act a blue one or a white one? >> there's a blue one? i've been in a white one before. >> all right, you two. why don't we go to politico. willie. >> he's just joshing. >> we're at the politico desk with willie geist. >> harold ford in a jet. >> with us now the correspondent for politico mike allen with a look at the playbook. good morning. >> good morning, willie. >> well, another senate republican is criticizing chris christie. jim inhofe was asked by a report fer he could back christie in 2013. he said i'm of the school you have to show a distinction between democrats and
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republicans. and in order to have the base energized you've got to show that the party stands for something. christie i still hold responsible for the re-election of president obama. the reporter asked because of sandy? senator inhofe relied, "and the way he handled it, yeah." before we should go further, senator inhofe got some tragic news yesterday about his son as well and we send our condolences. >> sunday dr. perry inhofe, 52, died in a plane crash back home. so this interview senator inhofe gave was right before that tragedy. in here we're seeing the challenge for chris christie that there is among a lot of conservatives, old-time conservatives, senator inhofe is going to be 79 this month, but also, willie, and this is maybe the most important part, among big republican donors there's residual unhappiness about the way that chris christie embraced president clinton -- president obama right at the end of the
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romney campaign. but so much water has gone under the dam since then. it's hard to imagine that issue lasting. it puts chris christie in a place where he has to make up some ground with these republicans. but that's a conversation that i can see occurring. it was such a disaster that either party gets a pass for working with their president on that issue. >> john, this is the tension that's been set up by a lot of people. chris christie may be appealing to the middle, but how does he get through the primary process? an old question skld of a lot of candidates. how does it set up for them? >> right now he's seen as a darming of people who are on television and establishment insofar as there is a republican establishment, he's seen as a figure there. mike, i'm wondering where is the energy right now for presidential candidates on the right? is it santorum? is it already to cruz? where do you think the real center of gravity is for
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challengers? >> the energy and action has been with senator cruz. there's been so much excitement about him and a sort of rage that we hear in the country from across the spectrum. and, you know, we've been talking the last couple days here on "morning joe" about the possibility of an elizabeth warren candidacy for president, whether the massachusetts senator might challenge hillary clinton. and that's a different kind of unhappiness. the populous raging. the income inequality that unquestionably is going to be an issue on the democratic primary. the nation is unhappy for a lot of good reasons. and senator cruz speaks to that. chris christie speaks to that in his candor, his bluntness. you know, a lot of people will tell you that the youtubes of chris christie speaking his mind will hurt him. i think that's exactly where a lot of the country is right now, and it's certainly where a lot of the republican base is, which will make up some of the steps that you're rightly pointing out, to he starts way behind with that group, really has to
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prove himself but his mood is their mood. >> mike allen, thanks so much. up next, award-winning filmmaker ken burns is here. he has a for all americans. he throws down the gauntlet next on "morning joe." there are seniors who have left hundreds of dollars of savings on the table by not choosing the right medicare d plan. no one could have left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors who compare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds of dollars. cvs/pharmacy wants to help you save on medicare expenses. talk to your cvs pharmacist, call, or go to cvs.com/compare to get your free, personalized plan comparison today. call, go online, or visit your local store today. it fills you with energy... and it gives you what you are looking for to live a more natural life. in a convenient two bar pack.
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four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation. >> conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. >> now we're engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. >> we are men on a great battlefield of that war. we have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. >> various leaders and celebrities on the new website learn the address dot-org, it's part of an initiative by filmmaker ken burns which launches today that challenges everyone across the country to read the gettysburg address in
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celebration of the 150th anniversary of the historic speech. and, ken joins us now. that's pretty cool. launching today, huh? >> it is launching today. you know, we don't do anything in unison anymore. we're always bickering and fighting with each other. what if we could do something? memorize or read the gettysburg address? we were able to get all the living presidents. >> how hard was that to do? >> it wasn't that hard. we got rachel maddow and bill o'reilly, nancy pelosi and marco rubio and plashed them all up. the reason why is i'm just finishing a film called "the address." for 35 years a little school in vermont called the greenwood students, has challenged its students, all dyslexic, learning difficulties kids, boys, to memorize and publicly recruit the gettysburg address. so heroic, it occurred if they can do it, we can do it, and we can engage in something in concert and recall the better angels of our nature and not this down in the gutter stuff.
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>> u.s. presidents, members of congress, usher, taylor swift. >> uma thurman. >> alyssa milano. great mix. >> sacred scripture. tell the story of how it was composed. >> he was asked as an afterthought, president lincoln, to go and attend the dedication of the union cemetery on november 19th. a week from today will be the 150th anniversary of that address. edward everett spoke for almost two hours, then the president was asked to give some remarks. he started off by reminding his audience that it had been only 87 years since the country's founding and went on to embolden the union cause with some of the most stirring words ever spoken, doubling down on the declaration of independence, because we had not dealt with the question of slavery. they were now dealing with it with the worst battle in american history on our shores. and lincoln was coming to double down on it. it is sacred text, that we hear
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highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain. it's an amazing two minutes of pure rhetoric. and there are generations that committed that, put it on their own hard drive, and we don't do that anymore for various reasons. and how great -- we're at baseball games and love to sing together. we're in church, we love to sing together. and why can't we do this with our sacred anthem like the gettysburg address? >> brian? >> i read it about ten times this morning and, you know, i hadn't done it maybe a couple times since college. and there are several spots here. obviously the last line, shall not perish from the earth, the whole concept of american exceptionalism, which we talked about ad nauseam when putin was going back and forth here, he clearly says that this is the one chance, maybe, in the earth's history to do -- you could conceive nation like this and have what we call a democracy. it just pops right off. >> he started in his 62 message to congress, what ke call the state of the union, saying that
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we're the last best hope of earth. but how, after this cataclysmic battle, three days, 10,000 dead, 56,000 casualties, it's just unspeakable slaughter in the beautiful quiet, rolling jenlt l hills and orchards of south central pennsylvania, that we could be remade, that we could have a new birth of freedom as he says in the address. it's wonderful. i just read a statistic last night that 83% of graduated college students, graduated, 83% cannot tell you what speech of, by, and for the people are from. this is part of our catechism. we have to know these things. all of us together. this is not a liberal or conservative agenda. this is let's do something together. so these kids, these little boys at the greenwood school in tiny putney, vermont, who have dyslexia and adhd, they learn it and they struggle for months to figure it out.
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it's a minefield of terrors and anxieties for them, but they do it. and then publicly recruit it. if they can do it, then any of us could memorize it and put it on our hard drive. >> what separates this speech, though, from any other speech over the next 100 years? because you would have to go about 100 years until martin luther king's speech -- >> is that. >> is that in washington. what separates the this short speech? >> it is the poetry of it. this is our great poet president. it's not just there. it's in his great last line of his first inaugural, the better angels of our nature. it's in his second inaugural with malice towards none, charity for all. it's in all the ways which he addressed the greatest cataclysm in american history and did it with a way that suggested how we might become. everything before the civil war led up to it. everything since has been a consequence of it. whether we're aware of it or not. and this is the pivotal swing moment where we come together.
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and he doubles down on the declaration and says, yes, we do mean that all men are created equal and we're willing to shed blood, you know, for this. it's hugely important that we know this and we inculcate it. there's nothing wrong with all of us absorbing this thing and understanding it. and that's why nobody said no. nobody said we don't want to read it. president obama did it, so did jimmy carter, bill clinton, bush one, bush two, all willingly and everyone else in their tracks stopped and said, yeah, how can we help? >> learntheaddress.org. always great to see you, red sox fan. up next, you used to have to pry kids away from the tv. with smartphones and ipads, that's changing. >> pretty radically. >> tom rogers joins us next to discuss how the industry is responding and how he's taking
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and low fees and commissions are another reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now, the ceo and president of tivo, tom rogers. good to have you on the show. >> great to be here. >> home territory here. >> home territory. when i was president of nbc cable and we started msnbc. >> yeah. >> we didn't know there was going to be a "morning joe," but i'll tell you of all the things i'm most proud of with this netwo network, it is "morning joe." >> thank you. >> we're here because of you. >> you do so many things but
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right now you're taking tivo by storm and great reviews on romeo. where you can actually take -- >> explain romeo. r-o-a-m. >> the bigger question is what's it do for content makers? it's hard to figure out how tv survives moving forward. >> well, actually, tv is doing much better than the music world did. music got crushed by the onslaught of digital. and incumbent players of tv are holding up pretty well. >> why is that? >> music happened first and the models got crushed, but what ended up for consumers is you can get any song you want from any device anywhere you are, personalize any way you want it. >> it's actually better for consumers. >> tv, the industry protected itself better, didn't quite end up quite as well for consumers in terms of being able to get anything you want all in one place, one box, one remote, search for anything no matter where it is. you don't have to know. >> you guys are doing that now.
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"the new york times" came out talking about roameo, only box you'll ever need. you can do that from wherever. a guy that was reviewing this said that he recorded "the simpsons" sunday night and watched it at his work desk on monday, and said in parentheses don't tell my boss. that's great, but if you can fast forward through the commercials and everything else. again, on the big picture, how does tv, how do the networks, the content producers survive that? >> well, what tivo tries to do is get people to what they care about most. what we're seeing is with all this so-called over-the-top programming, netflix, amazon, et cetera, people are watching more tv. they're not watching less traditional television. they're just watching more tv with these new sources. >> right. >> yes, there's commercial avoidance. commercial avoidance is huge the more popular the program. we see with prime time entertainment shows that are big-time shows, 80% of them being seen in recorded mode and
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70% sometimes -- >> 80%. >> 70% commercial avoidance. that's a big industry issue. having said that, the industry's navigating this much better than a lot of people thought and the big television companies are doing better than ever. >> i would argue that even when you fast forward it does make an imprint. one argument i would make. my children, when they're in a room that doesn't have something like tivo don't understand that you can't rewind or fast forward. they don't understand -- they don't get it. they just do not -- they don't understand that you can't do that. so it creates a built-in viability to what you do. but i will say, you usher over this entire revolution since '05, and a lot of people i talked to when i was at cnbc thought tivo might not be able to survive this three years ago, they said. but -- >> thriving. >> right. how are you able to ward off the cable companies and the internal dvr boxes that come with your system and all that stuff?
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>> and we were flatly rejected by the cable industry. they went out and got generic dvrs and people said that's it for tivo. tivo won't make it. what we decided to do is we had revolutionized television once so we needed to do it all over again. what we do now is we serve the cable industry. 10 of the top 20 cable companies in the u.s. use tivo as their advanced television approach because this got much more complicated than recording. video on demand, over the top, put it all together, one place, make it easy for people to get to and with the amount of options out there today it's chaos for consumers. what you need is an easy ability to get what you want, when you want it, wherever you are. that's our role in the world and we've come back with a great product that people are embra embraci embracing. >> is one possible revenue back to the future trip where you have g.e. theater or mutual of omaha, where you have to sponsor's name embedded in the program? >> it's a great point. i think the industry had been really slow about figuring out
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how they're going to deal with this commercial avoidance thing. supposedly the numbers get picked up with three days after viewing, so-called c-3, that picks up recorded viewing. but it really doesn't deal with the issue that a lot of the commercials are being avoided. so they're going to have to come up with new forms. that may well be a form of it. it's amazing. talking about four score and seven years ago, it was three score and seven years ago that television came on the scene. and when you think about what there was then, three channels in most markets, today infinite choice for consumers in a relatively short period of time, getting it any screen. i was just out of the country. i had you guys reported on my tivo at home, took out my ipad in my hotel room, lit it up with within three seconds and there i was watching you. >> the great irony is, by that, because what you're doing here is really where people are going in the future, kate will borrow
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my iphone. and she's got i think it's disney or something. and so we've got all these flat screens in the house and tvs keep getting bigger and bigger and bigger and when she watches tv -- >> yeah. it's a great boon for morning television. before the kids left for school, who watches, the kids program or the news program? >> spongebob -- >> and now "morning joe" can be on the kitchen tv. >> if you want to see patrick, i mean, really. >> i am patrick. i am patrick's father. >> he starts msnbc, takes tivo by storm, and you were just inducted into the broadcasting and cable hall of fame. >> hall of fame. congratulations. >> was it good for you? >> it was jack welch and the new chairman of the fcc, tom wheeler. and i am incredibly grateful to both of them. >> great men. >> jack welch, there would be no
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msnbc or for that matter cnbc without jack welch. >> there you go. what goes around comes around. >> tom rogers, thank you so much. and congratulations. this is a revolution. and "new york times," everybody else is writing it up that way. >> thanks for having me. life with crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis is a daily game of "what if's". what if my abdominal pain and cramps come back? what if the plane gets delayed? what if i can't hide my symptoms? what if? but what if the most important question
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welcome back to "morning joe." it's time to talk about what we learned today. brian, what have you learned? >> i can't get my mind off the gettysburg address, what we talked about with ken burns, fascinating at my age to look at something i read 20 years ago and still learn from it. it was pretty cool. >> it was. john, you've said one of three or four great speeches in american history. right? >> and part of a sequence because you have the declaration of independence, which is functionally a speech, then the gettysburg address, then dr. king. >> right. >> all sort of at century-long intervals defining what the country is. like "the right path." >> i was going to say isn't it amazing we had -- you talked about something, the declaration of independence, 1776, gettysburg address, almost 100 years later, then martin luther king's speech. our event last night at columbia, it kind of compressed. >> i think they're going to be

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