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tv   Government Access Programming  SFGTV  October 7, 2019 1:00pm-2:01pm PDT

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[singing] [singing] [applause] >> let's give another hand to the lightning singers, the red women lightning singers.
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there are three people i want to think as we close. first, nicole, the senior adviser to the mayor for helping us put together today. give us a wave. secondly, and finally i want to thank elise of the the department of the status of women. please waive. she held -- she helped put all of today's logistics together. i want to thank all of my staff at the department. please join us for a very large group photo which we want to do really quickly. everybody come on up.[music]
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>> san francisco city clinic provides a broad range of sexual health services from stephanie tran medical director
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at san francisco city clinic. we are here to provide easy access to conference of low-cost culturally sensitive sexual health services and to everyone who walks through our door. so we providestd checkups, diagnosis and treatment. we also provide hiv screening we provide hiv treatment for people living with hiv and are uninsured and then we hope them health benefits and rage into conference of primary care. we also provide both pre-nd post exposure prophylactics for hiv prevention we also provide a range of women's reproductive health services including contraception, emergency contraception. sometimes known as plan b. pap smears and [inaudible]. we are was entirely [inaudible]people will come as soon as were open even a little before opening. weight
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buries a lip it could be the first person here at your in and out within a few minutes. there are some days we do have a pretty considerable weight. in general, people can just walk right in and register with her front desk seen that day. >> my name is yvonne piper on the nurse practitioner here at sf city clinic. he was the first time i came to city clinic was a little intimidated. the first time i got treated for [inaudible]. i walked up to the redline and was greeted with a warm welcome i'm chad redden and anna client of city clinic >> even has had an std clinic since all the way back to 1911. at that time, the clinic was founded to provide std diagnosis treatment for sex workers. there's been a big increase in std rates after the earthquake and the fire a lot of people were homeless and there were more sex work and were homeless sex workers. there were some public health experts who are pretty progressive for their time thought that by providing std diagnosis and treatmentsex
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workers that we might be able to get a handle on std rates in san francisco. >> when you're at the clinic you're going to wait with whoever else is able to register at the front desk first. after you register your seat in the waiting room and wait to be seen. after you are called you come to the back and meet with a healthcare provider can we determine what kind of testing to do, what samples to collect what medication somebody might need. plus prophylactics is an hiv prevention method highly effective it involves folks taking a daily pill to prevent hiv. recommended both by the cdc, center for disease control and prevention, as well as fight sf dph, two individuals clients were elevated risk for hiv. >> i actually was in the project here when i first started here it was in trials. i'm currently on prep. i do prep through city clinic. you know i get my tests read here
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regularly and i highly recommend prep >> a lot of patients inclined to think that there's no way they could afford to pay for prep. we really encourage people to come in and talk to one of our prep navigators. we find that we can help almost everyone find a way to access prep so it's affordable for them. >> if you times we do have opponents would be on thursday morning. we have two different clinics going on at that time. when is women's health services. people can make an appointment either by calling them a dropping in or emailing us for that. we also have an hiv care clinic that happens on that morning as well also by appointment only. he was city clinic has been like home to me. i been coming here since 2011. my name iskim troy, client of city clinic. when i first learned i was hiv positive i do not know what it was. i felt my life would be just ending there but all the
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support they gave me and all the information i need to know was very helpful. so i [inaudible] hiv care with their health >> about a quarter of our patients are women. the rest, 75% are men and about half of the men who come here are gay men or other men who have sex with men. a small percent about 1% of our clients, identify as transgender. >> we ask at the front for $25 fee for services but we don't turn anyone away for funds. we also work with outside it's going out so any amount people can pay we will be happy to accept. >> i get casted for a pap smear and i also informed the contraceptive method. accessibility to the clinic was very easy. you can just walk in and talk to a registration staff. i feel i'm taken care of
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and i'm been supportive. >> all the information were collecting here is kept confidential. so this means we can't release your information without your explicit permission get a lot of folks are concerned especially come to a sexual health clinic unless you have signed a document that told us exactly who can receive your information, we can give it to anybody outside of our clinic. >> trance men and women face really significant levels of discrimination and stigma in their daily lives. and in healthcare. hiv and std rates in san francisco are particularly and strikingly high were trans women. so we really try to make city clinic a place that strands-friendly trance competent and trans-welcoming >> everyone from the front desk to behind our amazement there are completely knowledgeable. they are friendly good for me being a sex worker, i've gone through a lot of difficult different
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different medical practice and sometimes they weren't competent and were not friendly good they kind of made me feel like they slapped me on the hands but living the sex life that i do. i have been coming here for seven years. when i come here i know they my services are going to be met. to be confidential but i don't have to worry about anyone looking at me or making me feel less >> a visit with a clinician come take anywhere from 10 minutes if you have a straightforward concern, to over an hour if something goes on that needs a little bit more help. we have some testing with you on site. so all of our samples we collect here. including blood draws. we sent to the lab from here so people will need to go elsewhere to get their specimens collect. then we have a few test we do run on site. so those would be pregnancy test, hiv rapid test, and hepatitis b rapid test. people get those results the same day of their visit. >> i think it's important for transgender, gender neutral people to understand this is
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the most confidence, the most comfortable and the most knowledgeable place that you can come to. >> on-site we have condoms as well as depo-provera which is also known as [inaudible] shot. we can prescribe other forms of contraception. pills, a patch and rain. we provide pap smears to women who are uninsured in san francisco residents or, to women who are enrolled in a state-funded program called family pack. pap smears are the recommendation-recommended screening test for monitoring for early signs of cervical cancer. we do have a fair amount of our own stuff the day of his we can try to get answers for folks while they are here. whenever we have that as an option we like to do that obviously to get some diagnosed and treated on the same day as we can. >> in terms of how many people were able to see in a day, we say roughly 100 people.if people are very brief and
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straightforward visits, we can sternly see 100, maybe a little more. we might be understaffed that they would have a little complicated visits we might not see as many folks. so if we reach our target number of 100 patients early in the day we may close our doors early for droppings. to my best advice to be senior is get here early.we do have a website but it's sf city clinic.working there's a wealth of information on the website but our hours and our location. as well as a kind of kind of information about stds, hiv,there's a lot of information for providers on our list as well. >> patients are always welcome to call the clinic for there's a lot of information for providers on our list as well. >> patients are always welcome to call the clinic for 15, 40 75500. the phones answered during hours for clients to questions. >> >>
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>> growing up in san francisco has been way safer than growing up other places we we have that bubble, and it's still that bubble that it's okay to be whatever you want to. you can let your free flag fry he -- fly here. as an adult with autism, i'm here to challenge people's idea of what autism is. my journey is not everyone's journey because every autistic child is different, but there's hope. my background has heavy roots
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in the bay area. i was born in san diego and adopted out to san francisco when i was about 17 years old. i bounced around a little bit here in high school, but i've always been here in the bay. we are an inclusive preschool, which means that we cater to emp. we don't turn anyone away. we take every child regardless of race, creed, religious or ability. the most common thing i hear in my adult life is oh, you don't seem like you have autism. you seem so normal. yeah. that's 26 years of really, really, really hard work and i think thises that i still do. i was one of the first open adoptions for an lgbt couple. they split up when i was about four. one of them is partnered, and one of them is not, and then my biological mother, who is also a lesbian.
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very queer family. growing up in the 90's with a queer family was odd, i had the bubble to protect me, and here, i felt safe. i was bullied relatively infrequently. but i never really felt isolated or alone. i have known for virtually my entire life i was not suspended, but kindly asked to not ever bring it up again in first grade, my desire to have a sex change. the school that i went to really had no idea how to handle one. one of my parents is a little bit gender nonconforming, so they know what it's about, but my parents wanted my life to be safe. when i have all the neurological issues to manage, that was just one more to add to it. i was a weird kid. i had my core group of, like, very tight, like, three
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friends. when we look at autism, we characterize it by, like, lack of eye contact, what i do now is when i'm looking away from the camera, it's for my own comfort. faces are confusing. it's a lack of mirror neurons in your brain working properly to allow you to experience empathy, to realize where somebody is coming from, or to realize that body language means that. at its core, autism is a social disorder, it's a neurological disorder that people are born with, and it's a big, big spectrum. it wasn't until i was a teenager that i heard autism in relation to myself, and i rejected it. i was very loud, i took up a lot of space, and it was because mostly taking up space let everybody else know where i existed in the world. i didn't like to talk to people
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really, and then, when i did, i overshared. i was very difficult to be around. but the friends that i have are very close. i click with our atypical kiddos than other people do. in experience, i remember when i was five years old and not wanting people to touch me because it hurt. i remember throwing chairs because i could not regulate my own emotions, and it did not mean that i was a bad kid, it meant that i couldn't cope. i grew up in a family of behavioral psychologists, and i got development cal -- developmental psychology from all sides. i recognize that my experience is just a very small picture of that, and not everybody's in a position to have a family that's as supportive, but there's also a community that's incredible helpful and
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wonderful and open and there for you in your moments of need. it was like two or three years of conversations before i was like you know what? i'm just going to do this, and i went out and got my prescription for hormones and started transitioning medically, even though i had already been living as a male. i have a two-year-old. the person who i'm now married to is my husband for about two years, and then started gaining weight and wasn't sure, so i we went and talked with the doctor at my clinic, and he said well, testosterone is basically birth control, so there's no way you can be pregnant. i found out i was pregnant at 6.5 months. my whole mission is to kind of normalize adults like me. i think i've finally found my calling in early intervention, which is here, kind of what we do. i think the access to
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irrelevant care for parents is intentionally confusing. when i did the procespective search for autism for my own child, it was confusing. we have a place where children can be children, but it's very confusing. i always out myself as an adult with autism. i think it's helpful when you know where can your child go. how i'm choosing to help is to give children that would normally not be allowed to have children in the same respect, kids that have three times as much work to do as their peers or kids who do odd things, like, beach therapy. how do -- speech therapy. how do you explain that to the rest of their class? i want that to be a normal experience. i was working on a certificate and kind of getting think early
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childhood credits brefore i started working here, and we did a section on transgender inclusion, inclusion, which is a big issue here in san francisco because we attract lots of queer families, and the teacher approached me and said i don't really feel comfortable or qualified to talk about this from, like, a cisgendered straight person's perspective, would you mind talking a little bit with your own experience, and i'm like absolutely. so i'm now one of the guest speakers in that particular class at city college. i love growing up here. i love what san francisco represents. the idea of leaving has never occurred to me. but it's a place that i need to fight for to bring it back to what it used to be, to allow all of those little kids that come from really unsafe environments to move somewhere safe. what i've done with my life is work to make all of those situations better, to bring a little bit of light to all
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those kind of issues that we're still having, hoping to expand into a little bit more of a resource center, and this resource center would be more those new parents who have gotten that diagnosis, and we want to be this one centralized place that allows parents to breathe for a second. i would love to empower from the bottom up, from the kid level, and from the top down, from the teacher level. so many things that i would love to do that are all about changing people's minds about certain chunts, like the transgender community or the autistic community. i would like my daughter to know there's no wrong way to go through life. everybody experiences pain and grief and sadness, and that all of those things are temporary. >> hi today we have a special edition of building san francisco, stay safe, what we
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are going to be talking about san francisco's earth quakes, what you can do before an earthquake in your home, to be ready and after an earthquake to make sure that you are comfortable staying at home, while the city recovers. ♪ >> the next episode of stay safe, we have alicia johnson from san francisco's department of emergency management. hi, alicia thanks to coming >> it is a pleasure to be here with you. >> i wonder if you could tell us what you think people can do to get ready for what we know is a coming earthquake in san francisco. >> well, one of the most things that people can do is to make sure that you have a plan to communicate with people who live both in and out of state. having an out of state contact, to call, text or post on your social network is really important and being able to know how you are going to communicate with your friends,
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and family who live near you, where you might meet them if your home is uninhab hitable. >> how long do you think that it will be before things are restored to normal in san francisco. >> it depends on the severity of the earthquake, we say to provide for 72 hours tha, is three days, and it helps to know that you might be without services for up to a week or more, depending on how heavy the shaking is and how many after shocks we have. >> what kind of neighborhood and community involvement might you want to have before an earthquake to make sure that you are going to able to have the support that you need. >> it is important to have a good relationship with your neighbors and your community. go to those community events, shop at local businesses, have a reciprocal relationship with them so that you know how to take care of yourself and who you can rely on and who can take care of you. it is important to have a battery-operated radio in your
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home so that you can keep track of what is happening in the community around and how you can communicate with other people. >> one of the things that seems important is to have access to your important documents. >> yes, it is important to have copies of those and also stored them remotely. so a title to a home, a passport, a driver's license, any type of medical records that you need need, back those up or put them on a remote drive or store them on the cloud, the same is true with any vital information on your computer. back that up and have that on a cloud in case your hard drive does not work any more. >> in your home you should be prepared as well. >> absolutely. >> let's take a look at the kinds of things that you might want to have in your home. >> we have no water, what are we going to do about water? >> it is important for have extra water in your house, you want to have bottled water or a five gallon container of water able to use on a regular basis,
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both for bathing and cooking as well as for drinking. >> we have this big container and also in people's homes they have a hot water heater. >> absolutely, if you clean your hot water heater out regularly you can use that for showering, drinking and bathing as well >> what other things do people need to have aren't their home. >> it is important to have extra every day items buy a couple extra cans of can food that you can eat without any preparation. >> here is a giant can of green giant canned corn. and this, a manual can opener, your electric can opener will not be working not only to have one but to know where to find it in your kitchen. >> yes. >> so in addition to canned goods, we are going to have fresh food and you have to preserve that and i know that we have an ice chest. >> having an ice chest on hand is really important because your refrigerator will not be working right away. it is important to have
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somebody else that can store cold foods so something that you might be able to take with you if you have to leave your home. >> and here, this is my very own personal emergency supply box for my house. >> i hope that you have an alternative one at home. >> oh, i forgot. >> and in this is really important, you should have flashlights that have batteries, fresh batteries or hand crank flashlight. >> i have them right here. >> good. excellent. that is great. additionally, you are going to want to have candles a whistle, possibly a compass as well. markers if you want to label things if you need to, to people that you are safe in your home or that you have left your home. >> i am okay and i will meet you at... >> exactly. exactly. water proof matches are a great thing to have as well. >> we have matches here. and my spare glasses. >> and your spare glasses. >> if you have medication, you
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should keep it with you or have access to it. if it needs to be refrigerated make sure that it is in your ice box. >> inside, just to point out for you, we have spare batteries. >> very important. >> we have a little first aid kit. >> and lots of different kinds of batteries. and another spare flashlight. >> so, alicia what else can we do to prepare our homes for an earthquake so we don't have damage? >> one of the most important things that you can do is to secure your valuable and breakable items. make sure that your tv is strapped down to your entertainment cabinet or wall so it does not move. also important is to make sure that your book case is secure to the wall so that it does not fall over and your valuable and breakables do not break on the ground. becoming prepared is not that difficult. taking care of your home, making sure that you have a few extra every-day items on hand helps to make the difference. >> that contributes dramatically to the way that the city as a whole can recover.
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>> absolutely. >> if you are able to control your own environment and house and recovery and your neighbors are doing the same the city as a whole will be a more resilient city. >> we are all proud of living in san francisco and being prepared helps us stay here. >> so, thank you so much for joining us today, alicia, i appreciate it. >> absolutely, it is my pleasure. >> and thank you for joining us on another edition of building ♪ >> welcome to hamilton recreation and aquatics center. it is the only facility that has an integrated swimming pool and recreation center combined. we have to pools, the city's water slide, for little kids and
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those of you that are more daring and want to try the rockslide, we have a drop slide. >> exercises for everybody. hi have a great time. the ladies and guys that come, it is for the community and we really make it fun. people think it is only for those that play basketball or swim. >> i have been coming to the pool for a long time now. it is nice, they are sweet. >> in the aquatics center, they are very committed to combining for people in san francisco. and also ensuring that they have public safety. >> there are a lot of different personalities that come through here and it makes it very
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exciting all the time. they, their family or teach their kids have a swim. >> of the gem is fantastic, there is an incredible program going on there, both of my girls have learned to swim there. it is a fantastic place, check it out. it is an incredible indication of what bonn dollars can do with our hearts and facilities. it is as good as anything you will find out why mca. parents come from all over. >> there are not too many pools that are still around, and this is one-stop shopping for kids. you can bring your kid here and
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have a cool summer. >> if you want to see some of the youth and young men throughout san francisco play some great pickup games, come wednesday night for midnight basketball. on saturdays, we have a senior lyons dance that has a great time getting exercise and a movement. we have all the music going, the generally have a good time. whether it is awkward camp or junior guard. >> from more information, visit
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>> mayor breed: i just figured everybody would be at work and it would be a couple of us today. but i see the cole valley community came out. thank you so much for being here today at wooden, one of the newest establishments right here in the cole valley community. this is an amazing neighborhood. so many great places like reverie and the ice cream bar and zazie. this is an incredible place to enjoy the day. there's wine that you can buy. there is a postal service. there is hardware. anything that you want is located in this community. it's one of the best-kept secrets in san francisco. i know that because i come out here and hide a lot. [ laughter ]. >> mayor breed: but of course the community, they recognize me because i served as a supervisor
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and one of the things that we know happens sometimes with our small businesses, they get caught up in the bureaucracy, when all they want to do is provide a service to the community. this is a neighborhood where people know one another, where they walk down the street and see one another, where they hang out in places like this to enjoy each other's company. where we have watched kids grow up in this neighborhood. the fact that small businesses which oftentimes are run by the owners of the small businesses, the fact that they have to deal with so much bureaucracy makes me crazy. one of the things i have said we need to do time and time again is can you tell the bureaucratic red tape that gets in the way of allowing our small businesses to just exist and be enjoyable for
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communities like cole valley. [ applause ]. >> mayor breed: so i'd like to use this as an example, and let me pause for a minute and recognize captain bailey and the folks from park police station and the people who keep our community safe. we really appreciate you. [ applause ]. >> mayor breed: but when i was supervisor, val, you remember this, free gold watch. you all know that, the pinball machines in that place. so free gold watch, an incredible place. there were pinball machine tournaments, there were activities, a place where the community came together. well, unfortunately it discovered after they opened that they were basically not in compliance with the law. years ago in the 1980s when we thought that video games were going to destroy young people, destroy civilization as we know it, all these laws were created that limited the ability to have
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these arcade locations within the certain area of the school or a park or gas station and all this craziness. i just couldn't believe it that we could potentially lose this amazing institution because of some dated laws. of course, it's not just about creating new laws, but about fixing the old laws that put us in this situation in the first place. we got rid of that. free gold watch and all these other amazing places are open to bring back our childhood for most of us who lived through that time. this is no exception, where i think you just -- if you just wanted to basically have music and sell a little bit of wine and beer for a comedy night. what he had to go through has been crazy because of some laws
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that were passed that impact neighboring communities which is sometimes unfair. what we are doing today is making it easier for small businesses to provide what i think is a basic community service. of course, when you're watching comedy, you have to have wine or beer or some kind of beverage in your hand to just enjoy it. because most of the comics sometimes aren't even funny. [ laughter ]. >> mayor breed: so here we are. trying to make it easier for our small business community and sign this legislation. my commitment to addressing what we know is a real challenge around how small businesses are able to survive and thrive in this city is important to me. dealing with our empty store fronts, coming up with new solutions, both with changes to our policies but also with financial investments. even if we can't get rid of certain fees, i do think it's important that we continue through the mayor's office of
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economic and workforce development under the leadership of qua -- joaquim torez to make sure we are working with small businesses to do facade improvements and many others. this is how we're going to get there and the board of supervisors who has been incredibly focused. even before she was on the board of supervisors where she served as a legislative aid for two previous supervisors, i was one of those supervisors, there was no one more committed to supporting small businesses and being responsive to the community than your supervisor, district 5 supervisor, val brown. [ applause ]. >> i just want to thank a few people. i have them written down. i want to first thank the mayor.
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i want to thank the team at o.e.w.d., ben, when we were doing this legislation, it was grinding. just because it was pushed out, came back. ben would come back and think he had a way to do that. i want to thank my aide in the corner hiding like normal. [ applause ]. >> he kept saying, we can do it, we can do it. i want to thank the chamber of commerce. they were there all along coming to meetings and speaking in favor. the council of district merchants. and really especially the cole valley community. when this came to me -- i have to say, though, this is kind of a bit of a strange groundhog day for me. when we talked about this, actually planning came to us ten years ago and asked us to clean
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up a lot of the regulations around these kind of restrictions for businesses, because they said they were archaic, hurting small business. you have to remember ten years ago we were in a downturn, the economic downturn. we just didn't have time or the bandwidth to deal with it. when this came back to me ten years in the making, that happened with clean power. i started clean power and finished it in supervisor breed's office. this was ten years in the making again. but this time i said, hey, you know what? this is a heavy lift, but we need to do this for small businesses. we need to do this for the person that comes every morning, opens up their door, is here serving coffee, is here cutting your hair, giving you some of the best cheese you've ever had at say cheese. we need to do this for small business. they're struggling.
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we, as a city, should be doing everything we can to keep small businesses in place and to open small businesses. we need to be able to take the regulations away that hurt them, to take the time it takes to open a small business. i don't know how you can afford to pay for a space for a year to 18 months before you even have a business. how is that possible? you have to probably save for two years just to open a small business. so we have to say no. we have to make sure that we protect small businesses. because, look, i lived in lower haye for 20 years and then i moved into this community. i feel it's a mayberry. i walk down the street and know everybody. i can go from one store to another and get what i need for my everyday needs and meet the people that i absolutely adore
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on these streets. so we have to keep these neighborhood corridors vibrant. if we don't have vibrant neighborhood corridors, what does that do? that affects the whole entire community. when the neighbors came to me, cole valley, and said, look, we really support this business. they want a simple beer and wine license so he can have comedy night. how many times does a neighborhood come to you and say we want this business of a beer and wine? usually it's the owner, right? i said, wow, steve, you must have done something right in this neighborhood because they absolutely loved steve and said, steve, we want you to be here and successful. the least i could do was take this legislation and push it through. now, it took me three times before it went through l.a.n. use and i had third time is a
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charm and we got it through. we did it and we all worked together, and it was unanimous at the board. i want to thank everyone who was involved. there was so many people who came out for public comment. people behind the scenes saying this is what we need. steve, you came to those public comments. your staff watched the store while you came. your café. you waited and spoke three times. i'm sorry. we shouldn't be doing that to small businesses. so really appreciate your time becau because, steve, you helped the whole city. you helped the whole city when the supervisors heard your story and they said, we've got to help this person, this small business, you helped the whole city. so you're an activist. [ applause ].
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>> so that point i'm going to introduce steve wikwire that owns this marvelous café and give you a few words. thank you. [ applause ]. >> thank you all for being here. so some of you know i opened this shop after working in san francisco for ten years. i wanted to bring my passion and dedication for really high-end coffee service to cole valley, where i thought it was needed. it's been really awesome and amazing being able to contribute to this community. with this legislation passing, we'll be able to contribute more, namely, staying open later, providing beer and wine service, and doing really fun comedy shows here that i think
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will just breathe some new life into the neighborhood and add to the mix around here. i really just want to thank our district supervisor vallie brown and her team for supporting this. [ applause ]. >> if we do want to see more small businesses opening and being run by community members, people who want to serve their communities. it just needs to be a little bit easier to do. we need more pathways for these businesses to grow and adapt as they move forward. so that's really what this is all about. all of your support has made that happen here, so thank you all so much. [ applause ]. >> thank you. up next is rodney fong.
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>> thank you, steve. congratulations. i feel like it's a new day. it's a fresh breath of air. it literally is a chamber of commerce day here in san francisco. i want to thank mayor breed, supervisor brown for being champions of this legislation. all of the points you bring up about the vitality of san francisco, how important it is for our streets to be filled with people and to get involved with businesses. at the chamber of commerce we've put an emphasis on small businesses. i feel growing up in a small business and running our wax museum down at fishermen's wharf, creativity is the secret sauce. if we can give entrepreneurs the
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ability to be cultivators of things, we're going to do well. i'm happy to be here. i hope we have many, many more opportunities like this. congratulations to the planning department and clearing some of the red tape. hopefully we can get more businesses open here this san francisco. thank you very much for coming, and congratulations to you. [ applause ]. >> mayor breed: thank you, rodney. before we sign this legislation, i just want to thank our two small business commissioners for being here today. thank you so much. steve, who is the president of the commission and sharkie, one of the newest sworn-in commissioners because of his challenges with his small business here in san francisco. so you really have some champions helping to push forward the kinds of policies that hopefully will make a difference for our small business community here in san francisco. now, let's get this piece of legislation signed. [ applause ]
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[ applause ] [♪]
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>> this is one place you can always count on to give you what you had before and remind you of what your san francisco history used to be. >> we hear that all the time, people bring their kids here and their grandparents brought them here and down the line. >> even though people move away, whenever they come back to the city, they make it here. and they tell us that. >> you're going to get something made fresh, made by hand and made with quality products and something that's very, very good. ♪ >> the legacy bars and restaurants was something that was begun by san francisco simply to recognize and draw attention to the establishments.
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it really provides for san francisco's unique character. ♪ >> and that morphed into a request that we work with the city to develop a legacy business registration. >> i'm michael cirocco and the owner of an area bakery. ♪ the bakery started in 191. my grandfather came over from italy and opened it up then. it is a small operation. it's not big. so everything is kind of quality that way. so i see every piece and cut every piece that comes in and out of that oven. >> i'm leslie cirocco-mitchell, a fourth generation baker here with my family. ♪
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so we get up pretty early in the morning. i usually start baking around 5:00. and then you just start doing rounds of dough. loaves. >> my mom and sister basically handle the front and then i have my nephew james helps and then my two daughters and my wife come in and we actually do the baking. after that, my mom and my sister stay and sell the product, retail it. ♪ you know, i don't really think about it. but then when i -- sometimes when i go places and i look and see places put up, oh this is our 50th anniversary and everything and we've been over 100 and that is when it kind of hits me. you know, that geez, we've been here a long time. [applause] ♪ >> a lot of people might ask
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why our legacy business is important. we all have our own stories to tell about our ancestry. our lineage and i'll use one example of tommy's joint. tommy's joint is a place that my husband went to as a child and he's a fourth generation san franciscan. it's a place we can still go to today with our children or grandchildren and share the stories of what was san francisco like back in the 1950s. >> i'm the general manager at tommy's joint. people mostly recognize tommy's joint for its murals on the outside of the building. very bright blue. you drive down and see what it is. they know the building. tommy's is a san francisco hoffa, which is a german-style presenting food.
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we have five different carved meats and we carve it by hand at the station. you prefer it to be carved whether you like your brisket fatty or want it lean. you want your pastrami to be very lean. you can say i want that piece of corn beef and want it cut, you know, very thick and i want it with some sauerkraut. tell the guys how you want to prepare it and they will do it right in front of you. san francisco's a place that's changing restaurants, except for tommy's joint. tommy's joint has been the same since it opened and that is important. san francisco in general that we don't lose a grip of what san francisco's came from. tommy's is a place that you'll always recognize whenever you lock in the door. you'll see the same staff, the same bartender and have the same meal and that is great. that's important.
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♪ >> the service that san francisco heritage offers to the legacy businesses is to help them with that application process, to make sure that they really recognize about them what it is that makes them so special here in san francisco. ♪ so we'll help them with that application process if, in fact, the board of supervisors does recognize them as a legacy business, then that does entitle them to certain financial benefits from the city of san francisco. but i say really, more importantly, it really brings them public recognition that this is a business in san
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francisco that has history and that is unique to san francisco. >> it started in june of 1953. ♪ and we make everything from scratch. everything. we started a you -- we started a off with 12 flavors and mango fruits from the philippines and then started trying them one by one and the family had a whole new clientele. the business really boomed after that. >> i think that the flavors we make reflect the diversity of san francisco. we were really surprised about the legacy project but we were thrilled to be a part of it. businesses come and go in the city.
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pretty tough for businesss to stay here because it is so expensive and there's so much competition. so for us who have been here all these years and still be popular and to be recognized by the city has been really a huge honor. >> we got a phone call from a woman who was 91 and she wanted to know if the mitchells still owned it and she was so happy that we were still involved, still the owners. she was our customer in 1953. and she still comes in. but she was just making sure that we were still around and it just makes us feel, you know, very proud that we're carrying on our father's legacy. and that we mean so much to so many people. ♪
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>> it provides a perspective. and i think if you only looked at it in the here and now, you're missing the context. for me, legacy businesses, legacy bars and restaurants are really about setting the context for how we come to be where we are today. >> i just think it's part of san francisco. people like to see familiar stuff. at least i know i do. >> in the 1950s, you could see a picture of tommy's joint and looks exactly the same. we haven't change add thing. >> i remember one lady saying, you know, i've been eating this ice cream since before i was born. and i thought, wow! we have, too. ♪ shop and dine on the 49 promotes local businesses and challenges residents to do shopping and dining within the 49 square
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miles of san francisco by supporting local services within neighborhood. we help san francisco remain unique, successful and vibrant. where will you shop and dine in the 49? san francisco owes the charm to the unique character of the neighborhood comer hall district. each corridor has its own personality. our neighborhoods are the engine of the city. >> you are putting money and support back to the community you live in and you are helping small businesses grow. >> it is more environmentally friendly. >> shopping local is very important. i have had relationships with my local growers for 30 years. by shopping here and supporting us locally, you are also supporting the growers of the
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flowers, they are fresh and they have a price point that is not imported. it is really good for everybody. >> shopping locally is crucial. without that support, small business can't survive, and if we lose small business, that diversity goes away, and, you know, it would be a shame to see that become a thing of the past. >> it is important to dine and shop locally. it allows us to maintain traditions. it makes the neighborhood. >> i think san francisco should shop local as much as they can. the retail marketplace is changes. we are trying to have people on the floor who can talk to you and help you with products you
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are interested in buying, and help you with exploration to try things you have never had before. >> the fish business, you think it is a piece of fish and fisherman. there are a lot of people working in the fish business, between wholesalers and fishermen and bait and tackle. at the retail end, we about a lot of people and it is good for everybody. >> shopping and dining locally is so important to the community because it brings a tighter fabric to the community and allows the business owners to thrive in the community. we see more small businesses going away. we need to shop locally to keep the small business alive in san francisco.
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>> shop and dine in the 49 is a cool initiative. you can see the banners in the streets around town. it is great. anything that can showcase and legitimize small businesses is a wonderful thing.
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